Poll: If you’ve used an agent to buy or sell a home, how did you choose?

If you've used an agent to buy or sell a home, how did you choose?

  • had a friend or family member who is an agent (22%, 20 Votes)
  • chose an agent used by a friend or family member (30%, 27 Votes)
  • searched for & researched agents online (22%, 20 Votes)
  • chose the agent on yard signs in my neighborhood (2%, 2 Votes)
  • chose the agent who sent me a postcard in the mail (1%, 1 Votes)
  • some other way... (specify in comments) (22%, 20 Votes)

Total Voters: 90

This poll was active 01.06.2013 through 01.12.2013

  

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

81 comments:

  1. 1

    I’d be interested in what those researching on-line look for. Volume? I’m not seeing what useful information could be discovered, particularly on the buyer’s side.

    Keep in mind though I consider this a near impossible task. To find a good lawyer my suggestion is to go to law school and then practice for 5 years in the area that you need help. Determining who is a good agent is not all that much different.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  2. 2
    ray pepper says:

    finding real estate agents on-line can be glorious: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYuH5bIgzoo

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  3. 3
    whatsmyname says:

    How many realtors are there to choose from in say, King County?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  4. 4
    Pegasus says:

    I think the Seattle Bubble provides a forum where numerous real estate agents attempt to hock their wares. I suspect since many of their postings are endless self-centered nonsense that they must receive some sort of personal gratification. If one wants to be dominated by a clown pick Kary.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  5. 5

    RE: Pegasus @ 4 – So says someone who is an admitted troll.

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2012/01/02/the-tims-top-ten-of-twenty-eleven/comment-page-1/#comment-153139

    As if we needed that admission. Pure troll behavior.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  6. 6
    Pegasus says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 5 – The jackass appears again. Hee haw, hee haw, hee haw, hee haw, hee haw,……Its not trolling to point out a poster’s fallacies, board bullying and shortcomings. But thank you for being you. Again.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  7. 7

    We all know you’re a troll. You’ve admitted it, and proven it twice in just this post.

    You’re also a gullible fool, but that’s a whole different topic.

    Now how about going off and support whatsmyname in the politics thread–show your ignorance of the term “fraud.” We could all use a good laugh at your expense as you prove your ignorance once again.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  8. 8
    corndogs says:

    RE: Pegasus @ 4 – “If one wants to be dominated by a clown”

    You get dominated because you’re cerebral cortex is smooth and unfolded with the surface area of a playing card.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  9. 9

    I Just Picked One Near My Neighborhood

    I did end up getting the paperwork rushed faster by doing a lot of the work myself, but that likely would have happenned anyway.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  10. 10

    RE: Corndogs @ 8 – It is not intelligence Pegasus is lacking. He just doesn’t care about the facts, making up claims all the time as to what my position has in the past.

    As to this topic, my position on this site has clearly always been that the agent advises a client, and doesn’t control what they do (within the limitations of the law). That’s a very basic concept of what an agent does. They represent their client. But despite that, Pegasus throws out a “dominated” claim, something totally made up, as are most of his claims. And since prior events demonstrate that this type of misrepresentation is intentional on his part, that means Pegasus is something even worse than being an admitted troll.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  11. 11
    Blurtman says:

    It is best to keep your agent handy, locked in the basement.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8kPqAV_74M

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  12. 12
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Corndogs @ 8 – The cerebral cortex is involved with language. On that note, here is a cheat-sheet for you, Cornholio.

    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-You%27re-and-Your

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  13. 13

    When one half of all consumers look no further than their known circle — i.e. without looking beyond some traditional agent’s “sphere of influence” — it’s tough to change the world. But on the plus side, one quarter of consumers are willing to scratch the surface and dig a little deeper, and those consumers will lead the way to an improved brokerage system. It would be interesting to see the results of this question five or ten years ago, and again in another five or ten. You’d think that the trend towards an “informed consumer” is clear and unstoppable, but then again a lot of influence can be exerted within that sphere.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  14. 14
    corndogs says:

    RE: wreckingbull @ 12 – If I’d known you were tuning in I’d use the old English variation y’hore in reference to your wife. Corndog wins. Thanks for playing.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  15. 15

    On four occassions I’ve used agents in the past(prior to joining the ranks of the evil ones). On each of those times, wrong thinking was used. I’ve always had, and continue to have a mistrust of real estate agents. So when we saw a house for sale, we just contacted the listing agent, thinking that if we had an agent of our own, they’d be out to screw us over. When we were thinking about selling years later ,and received an unsolicited offer, the buyer insisted that we use his agent. Sure, I thought, having your own agent is bad news.
    I think differently now. The listing agent works for the seller, the buyer’s agent works for the buyer. Yes, they mostly work for themselves, but not having your own representation is going to hurt you. I’ve got no idea how to pick an agent. Finding one who does a lot of volume isn’t going to be much help. McDonald’s and Walmart do lots of volume. Most people want to do what everyone else is doing, and assume that what the masses want must be good.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  16. 16
    David B. says:

    Last time, I asked friends, and one name came up consistently. But he was headed out on a long (like 6 months) vacation, so no dice. Not having a useful recommendation, I went with someone who advertised regularly in the neighborhood newspaper, and who always had a lot of condos in his featured properties (the property was a condo).

    Probably the biggest thing that helped it sell was that I hadn’t bought it at the top of the bubble, and didn’t have unrealistic expectations of selling price, so I was willing (and able) to gradually lower the price as it stayed on the market. Still made money on it, and I don’t consider market price to be defined by stuff that’s sat on the market unsold for nearly a year at a certain price per square foot.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  17. 17
    ChrisM says:

    I’ve asked “how does one (wisely) choose a real estate agent” before, and never received a good answer. I was kicking around the idea of taking the classes and finding an accommodating broker, but in the end will probably go either w/ Redfin if they have coverage, or with the listing agent if they’re willing.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  18. 18

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 15:

    Finding one who does a lot of volume isn’t going to be much help. McDonald’s and Walmart do lots of volume. Most people want to do what everyone else is doing, and assume that what the masses want must be good.

    Too much volume at some point means too little service, or worse, being handed off to someone else who might not know what they’re doing.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  19. 19

    By ChrisM @ 17:

    I was kicking around the idea of taking the classes and finding an accommodating broker, . . ..

    I’m not sure how many places are willing to do that now. With the increased supervision required under the new licensing law, there’s more exposure. If you wanted to sell doing that, it’s even less likely they would let you do that. Some offices won’t let experienced agents list their own properties (a position their malpractice carriers prefer).

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  20. 20
    jeanette says:

    our mortgage agent suggested someone for us, and it actually worked out very well.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  21. 21

    By jeanette @ 20:

    our mortgage agent suggested someone for us, and it actually worked out very well.

    That’s actually a decent way to go. They tend know a lot of agents and know who gets the job done and can deal with issues that arise.

    Conversely, getting a loan originator from your agent is also a good way to go, for the same reason.

    Unfortunately you can’t do both!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  22. 22
    Plymster says:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 15 – That’s an interesting history of your experience with agents. It makes me feel a bit better about choosing based on their historical blog input.

    I’ve held off purchasing a home for a number of years (since 2004) because I felt (and still feel) that the market was overpriced, and because I didn’t trust RE Agents. I picked an agent previously after doing a walk-through at an open house and speaking to the fellow who was showing the house. He was only happy to goad me into a bidding war on a home (which I’m VERY happy I didn’t win in 2004, partly due to location, partly due to it being overpriced). Since then, I’ve been gunshy about dealing with an agent again.

    But having followed Seattlebubble for a number of years, and having seen how certain agents present (or overpresent themselves, consuming 33% or more of the comments for each blog post), I will probably use Redfin, Ira, or WA Law if my wife and I finally purchase a home this year. Redfin seems to have a very realistic and helpful, data-driven approach to dealing with the RE market, and Ira and Craig have both presented themselves as solid professionals, based on their comments that I have seen.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  23. 23
    Ray pepper says:

    I’d use Ira of those 3. The other two are like a box of chocolates. But, if you held off since 2004 please explain to us why you would buy now? Please don’t tell me because of the low rates. That would be the WORST reason to buy now. Do you like the inventory? Gems popping up all around your target area? Got a raise?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  24. 24
    Ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 21 – Disagree Kary. Getting an agent from the advice of ” mortgage professional” is not recommended. They will most surely point you to their ” lunch buddy” or personal friend. The same goes for Agents telling you a ” good lender.” Due diligence always friends.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  25. 25
    Ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 18 – Wow, Kary. Your a bit off today. Someone’s volume does not indicate any type of service you will get. Especially poor service. Do you choose Attorneys that have no clients? Due diligence friends!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  26. 26
    Plymster says:

    RE: Ray pepper @ 23 – The only reason I am considering buying now is because I in an extremely stable financial position and will be able to live in whatever home I buy for decades if I choose (thanks to saving like misers and being two of those lucky souls who didn’t lose their jobs over the last 5 years). I am also convinced that with QE-4-Ever, the Federal Reserve has committed itself to the monitization of all banking and Federal debt to prop up the housing market (all markets, really). The lack of anything resembling law enforcement of the financial sector (slap-on-the-wrist fines notwithstanding) has also made me lose hope that asset prices will revert to reality, as banks will be able to carry non-performing loans forever (an acquaintance has not paid her mortgage since 2010, and hasn’t heard a peep on the foreclosure front). My view is that the Fed will continue to print as much money as it takes to paper over the bad debt generated over the last 30 years. As such, I see home prices at or close enough to a bottom, and view buying a home to be a hedge against inflation (if jobs/wages ever return to an upward trend), or at the very least, a relatively stable shelter.

    So I guess we might buy because (a) we can afford it (with or without low rates), and (b) I think the government will inflate away Wall Street’s fraud. That said, if inventory is still non-existent, I may not be able to find a home that meets my requirements. We’ve still got a few months before we start looking, though, so maybe things will change for the better.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  27. 27
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Plymster @ 26 – I’m sure your rental status is also fine since you did not mention it. I encourage you to ALWAYS look. I tell everyone this. You never know when your GEM will pop up. However, there is tremendous competition in the desirable areas and as MOST know I do NOT suggest engaging in any form of “highest and best” multiple offers. When everyone is piling in its usually a great indicator to get OUT.

    If in doubt……………..Walk Away! ……..My best advice for anyone contemplating BUYING in this environment.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  28. 28
    Ron says:

    On two separate occasions in 1999 my wife and I drove into a neighborhood we liked, found a brokerage booklet at a local coffee shot, called one of the brokers on a listing in our price range, and purchased two rental properties that we own today. Great service. It was in Eugene and Florence where we didn’t know anyone and only new that home prices at the time were far more affordable in Oregon than in Seattle. It’s fairly easy to judge someone’s character and professional experience while sitting in their office for about 30 minutes. We did our due diligence and paid attention to what was going on but overall, our agent was on the ball and responsible. That was before the internet was in full swing. Ron

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  29. 29
    ChrisM says:

    RE: Ray pepper @ 25 – Hi Ray. Two questions:

    1. You say do due diligence on lenders. What should we be looking for?

    2. “But, if you held off since 2004 please explain to us why you would buy now?” I’m in the same boat. I’m looking at 4-plexes as an investment where I’d be owner occupant on one of the units for the required period. I’ve owned rentals before, so know what I’m getting into. The low rates mean even if values plummet I’m still ahead on cash flow, assuming property taxes don’t skyrocket. Do you disagree?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  30. 30
    ARDELL says:

    RE: whatsmyname @ 3

    I don’t think anyone answered this since I saw it come up. Just scanned the comments. Have my hands full right now but I’ll give it a shot.

    1) l “agents” are now called ‘brokers”.
    2) Brokers are licensed by State not County.
    3) Most agents/brokers cross County lines. North End agents will do some South Snohomish. South end agents will do some Pierce, etc…

    The mls is not Statewide so the reports are usually the number that belong to the mls and our Seattle area mls is one of the largest, and maybe “THE” largest in the Country and covers many Counties, but not the entire State.

    All that said, last I looked it had gone down from 15,000 to 16,000 to 11,500 or so. But that is not for “King County” specifically or exclusively. I want to say that number is from sometime last year.

    Sorry for the vague response. I was hoping someone else would have “the” number, like The Tim or Kary. But I didn’t want to see your question go totally unanswered and ignored.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  31. 31
    whatsmyname says:

    RE: ARDELL @ 30 – Thank you Ardell. Tim had a link in the sour note post to a NWMLS article with numbers for the 21 counties, and which I posted in the replies. Nothing for King Co. specifically, and I’m sure some people just park their license for a rainy day, but the relative inventory number is tighter than I would have ever guessed.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  32. 32
    ray pepper says:

    RE: ChrisM @ 29 – First off I would NEVER live in the same 4 plex as my tenants. I know too many many 4-10 plex owners in our RE groups and all state that was their original intention. They quickly realize this is NOT the way to financial and personal prosperity. In fact most say its a nightmare and many attempt to keep it a secret from their tenants initially, that they own the property. IT DOESN’T WORK!

    Taxes, Insurance, and upkeep will always escalate as the property ages and time marches on. There is no guarantee on rents doing the same. Rates can ALWAYS be bought down by motivated sellers so in low interest rate environments such as these a GIANT WARNING flag should be waving. As rates rise do you think property values will? I suggest not.

    Lastly, can you give me an MLS # of a 4 plex thats currently on the mkt that you find to be an exceptional value? I would love to look at it. Are you planning on placing 50% down? If so then of course it BETTER be cash flow BIG TIME..I find duplexes and 4 plexes to be terrible investments and the numbers only start to get appealing at 20 units…

    Many partners are actively dumping their multi-units the last 6 months and the rest appear to be doing the same. When asked at the November meeting why they are choosing to do this NOW they all laughed when one of the guys yelled out……………”because we FINALLY can!!!!”……….

    Lastly, for lenders and Agents assess your needs first. Then, ask the Lender/Agent what will you do for me that is DIFFERENT then all your competitors. If you get the predictable response move on or ask more questions like this……..Agent……..”Tell me why you deserve 3% of MY MONEY to represent me in a transaction…Agent do you not agree its my money? If they state its the sellers……….MOVE ON!….

    For the Lender…………….”Tell me why I should pay YOU for Lending me money that is NOT EVEN YOURS?” Analyze your answers and good luck my friend!…….

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  33. 33

    By Ray pepper @ 24:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 21 – Disagree Kary. Getting an agent from the advice of ” mortgage professional” is not recommended. They will most surely point you to their ” lunch buddy” or personal friend. The same goes for Agents telling you a ” good lender.” Due diligence always friends.

    I would agree with that if you’re talking about attorney referrals. There the attorney just hands out a name and probably never hears another thing about the matter, except maybe a thank you from the attorney referred. But real estate is different, because the referring party works with the referred party on the transaction. They only get paid if the transaction closes. That gives them a vested interest in someone who will not cause the deal to fail. Competency is going to be the number one factor in their decision making.

    And the number one thing that can cause a deal to fail once you’re past inspection is a bad loan originator.

    That said, the buyer should of course check rates and fees, particularly fees.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  34. 34

    By Ray pepper @ 25:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 18 – Wow, Kary. Your a bit off today. Someone’s volume does not indicate any type of service you will get. Especially poor service. Do you choose Attorneys that have no clients? Due diligence friends!

    I’m beginning to wonder if you are really an agent. You think clients don’t want to ride in agents’ cars because agents don’t know much about real estate compared to their clients. You don’t understand why an agent would want a good loan officer and visa versa. And now you apparently don’t understand how much time it takes to properly serve a client’s needs, and how having too many clients can impact the ability to provide such service.

    These are really bizarre comments from an agent.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  35. 35

    RE: Ray pepper @ 24 – Just out of curiosity, if you have a listing and you get an offer, don’t you ask the buyer’s agent about how the buyer found the loan originator? That’s sometimes one of the most important pieces of information about the offer, and something I will always ask in a multiple offer situation.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  36. 36

    By ChrisM @ 29:

    RE: Ray pepper @ 25 – Hi Ray. Two questions:

    1. You say do due diligence on lenders. What should we be looking for?

    The bigger question would be how you would look! What you need to know about their abilities isn’t public or even privately reported information.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  37. 37
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 34 – Kary at 500 Realty we were and ARE investors. Personally, my wife and I are RN’s too. As you know we attend the Auctions in different states but in 2006 we were fed up with the SHAM of real estate and we all said lets HELP THE PUBLIC and try to spread our message.

    I can go on and on but you already know me so I won’t. We choose to help Buyers and Sellers when they need it and WE decide who we engage with. Many times we cast away our clients due to our other commitments. Most we send back to Red Fin because we get ALOT of their clients. When RF clients realize how much money they will be getting back they seem to call us incessantly after digging a bit deeper on the web. These clients understand what we try to educate so we adore the platform Red Fin has. We just can’t handle ALL the people. There is only 9 of us and the partners have similar obligations as myself.

    So to answer your question..Yes I’m an Agent , Investor, Nurse, Father, and Coach of many sports. I enjoy all the hats I wear.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  38. 38

    RE: ray pepper @ 37 – With all those hats seemingly you’d be able to better recognize the limitation on how many clients you can service at one time. My point was high volume means either less service or dealing with an assistant. But without explanation you seem to think that’s not the case for some reason.

    Interesting that you send people to Redfin, because you’ve been very critical of their fee schedule here.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  39. 39
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 38 – Oh YES..I’m VERY critical of their fee schedule but I also understand RF is a BUSINESS and they must answer to their VC. Their rebates have just been sliced so thin that the consumer gets virtually nothing back anymore.

    Yes, we understand our limitations and for this reason we choose who we will engage with initially and if we cannot service their needs in full capacity we wish them well on there way back to Red Fin. We would love to send them to Findwell, Zipr, Shop Prop, or even Wa Law but their business models either have HUGE office minimums or require fees upfront which we would NEVER advise anyone to engage in.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  40. 40

    RE: ray pepper @ 39 – Yes, Ray, that $500 fee up front – when hiring WaLaw – is an OUTRAGE! An absolute travesty!! Who do we think we are, asking our clients to put a little “skin in the game” while beefing up our cash flow? I mean, it is INSANE to think that a buyer of real estate might have to pay for related – essential? – services out-of-pocket, even if the buyer never closes. Sure, when that buyer DOES close, they’ll save a ton of money, even possibly more – GASP! – than the ultimate discount shop, 500 Realty. But that is essentially meaningless since the client had to pay five HUNDRED dollars up front… [That last sentence should be read aloud in an “Austin Powers” voice.]

    Of course, there is the additional benefit of working with a licensed attorney. But having to pay a little dough up front, and committing to the fee in any event? Sorta like working with any other attorney? Totally beyond the pale. How do those guys even stay in business? They’re awful.

    ;-)

    For the record, I would answer all of your questions above “correctly” (I probably DON’T deserve 3% of the sale price as a fee, it IS the buyer’s money, etc. etc. etc.)

    Unrelated etiquette tip: Those who torpedoed my post above (it was 13 “downs” and counting), I’d love to know why. Did it rise to the level of “rank self-promotion”? And presumably I owe Tim a “thanks” for resetting it and bringing it back into focus. Thanks Tim!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  41. 41
    The Tim says:

    RE: Craig Blackmon @ 40 – Well you can thank the buggy thumbs up / down plugin, because I didn’t do anything. It seems that for some reason all the comment votes just get reset once in a while, which is actually kind of annoying.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  42. 42

    RE: The Tim @ 41 – Thank you, Annoying WordPress Plugin!

    I’m at three “downs” already on the follow up post. I feel like the loser nerdy kid in 8th grade. Why do people HATE me? WAAAAH!!!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  43. 43
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Craig Blackmon @ 40 – Craig what are the “essential? – services out-of-pocket” that you describe? Gasoline? Stamps?

    Nothing personal..I just never pay upfront for anything other then an occasional order from Amazon.

    Also, we both know the added “benefit” of working with an Attorney may not be a benefit at all. So many lousy Attorneys out there striving to pay off those student loans and working at car dealerships and Costco its comical if it wasn’t so tragic.

    Taking 500 up front does not guarantee ANY performance from your client. It just takes 500 from your client!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  44. 44

    By Craig Blackmon @ 42:

    RE: The Tim @ 41 – Thank you, Annoying WordPress Plugin!

    I’m at three “downs” already on the follow up post. I feel like the loser nerdy kid in 8th grade. Why do people HATE me? WAAAAH!!!

    1. You’re a real estate agent. For some very valid reasons, people hate real estate agents. Even if you were to reveal a cure for cancer or the secret to immortality. you’d get thumbs down votes. I’m a swell guy with some brilliant things to say, but because I’m a real estate agent, I always get thumbs down votes.
    2. Even worse, you’re an attorney. For some very valid reasons, people hate attorneys. If someone were to reveal a cure for cancer or the secret to immortality, some attorney would be suing them.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  45. 45

    RE: ray pepper @ 43 – Ray, the “essential services” are the services of a professional to assist a buyer in purchasing real property. Those service are provided most commonly by an agent, occasionally by a lawyer, and every once in a while by both (even if its the same person). My point is that it is reasonable to ask a client to pay for those services even if the client never actually closes (because presumably the client made offers, inspected homes, and unsuccessfully negotiated resolution of inspection contingencies. It is the rare “buyer” indeed who retains a professional to assist in a purchase and then takes no steps whatsoever to actually buy.

    Agreed, sometimes you get a good lawyer, sometimes a bad one (thus highlighting the importance of “due diligence” when hiring one). But a lawyer possesses skills and knowledge that an agent lacks, skills and knowledge highly relevant to the transaction. Surely you agree…..

    Finally, you actually make my point nicely with your conclusion. Only a real estate agent paid on commission cares about whether the client “performs.” I don’t care. Client changes mind, decides not to buy after making several offers and rescinding several contracts? Fine with me. My fee is unrelated to closing. You are the only one who cares about whether the client “performs.” And “taking” $500 from a client? That’s called a fee, and I don’t take it, is paid to me voluntarily as part of the terms of my retention.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  46. 46

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 44 – Ah, so it’s rank prejudice, huh? And I thought you were an optimist… ;-)

    Five and counting, I’ll be faded out again in short order…….

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  47. 47

    RE: ray pepper @ 43 – I can’t believe you have a hard time understanding how a fee would be less if it’s not entirely contingent.

    I like Craig’s model, but it wouldn’t work well at all with a real estate brokerage involved, given splits, the possible need for refunds, caps and such.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  48. 48

    RE: Craig Blackmon @ 46 -I tell you, I lie awake worrying about those votes every night. They make other problems like a seller not making repairs, an FHA appraiser refusing to turn over an appraisal, and the closing of a HUD transaction seem like tiny, tiny problems.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  49. 49
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 44 – agreed Ira..Attorneys, Used Car Sales People, and Real Estate Agents. They are the bottom feeders. Add an Attorney License to a Real Estate License and you really have a sea sucker.

    Then you add the condescending “tone” of Craig along with some of the previous “brilliant” remarks from his partner Marc in the last year, and you get the feeling of a couple of buffoons at an office patting each other on the back daily gazing at their licenses on the wall………

    I know I posted this before but you may still may not see it. There is nothing more you bring to the table of real estate no matter how much you tell yourself you do. Real Estate is not rocket science and its pretty well formatted by our dying MLS system as we know it. Most Brokerages, including ours, have Attorney’s when needed. But, the fact is with competent Agents they are just good for their boiler point threatening letter every few years. With so many running around unemployed its simply tragic. Those student loans MUST get paid!

    If I may……..Q: Why did God invent lawyers?
    A: So that real estate agents would have someone to look down on.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  50. 50
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Craig Blackmon @ 45 – “That’s called a fee, and I don’t take it, is paid to me voluntarily as part of the terms of my retention. ”

    Its called a fee…You don’t take it….Yet we have a client who paid it….They have a net loss of 500….So with the clients 500 loss who pays the taxes on the 500 gain? You said you didn’t take it. Client doesn’t have it anymore. Its called a fee?………….

    Maybe its me..Did you ever describe the “essential services”..Is it gas? toner? Do you take your clients to Lunch? The Met? Now, if so……….Then a 200 “fee” maybe warranted but it might just be easier to ask the client to buy you lunch…But, I get it…Your still out the gas and toner…….

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  51. 51

    RE: ray pepper @ 49 – Ray, you don’t know what you don’t know. Sort of like Ardell telling people in the other thread how to rip off the elderly by paying $400,000 for a $550,000 house. To an attorney that causes all sorts of alarm bells are going off there. To a real estate agent the only thought is “great deal.” Even her other story in that thread causes me to think: “I hope they had an attorney set up that transaction.” It apparently worked, but I can see a couple of potential pitfalls if that is not done properly from what little was described.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  52. 52
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 51 – In that same language Kary I’m pretty confident in saying that….

    Kary doesn’t know what he doesn’t know.
    Ardell doesn’t know what what she doesn’t know.
    Tim, has no clue on what he doesn’t know.
    and Craig and Marc SURELY don’t know what they dont know.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  53. 53

    RE: ray pepper @ 52 – Yes, that’s correct, but the difference between those things is incredible. Just and example, Craig, Marc and I know more about real estate title issues than the people you would call at the title company to answer your questions (assuming that’s not the title company’s attorney).

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  54. 54

    RE: ray pepper @ 50 – Ray, like my comments I’ll be fading away now, I don’t get much enjoyment from being called a buffoon (and I don’t think it is in anyone’s interest if I respond in kind). But please re-read my reply above, the one that begins with ‘Ray, the “essential services” are…’

    You kids have fun ripping each other, I’m out.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  55. 55
    ARDELL says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 51

    Why do you keep saying that when several people have already pointed out that you are INCORRECT about representing me in that manner? You call people who don’t answer you “cowards”. I call you a coward because you for years have refused to meet me in person.

    Yes…I would punch you right in the nose and yes it would be worth a few days in jail to do it.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  56. 56
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 53RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 53

    Good God Kary…

    I will give you a pass and say OK you know more about Title Issues then the people at a title company (because you say you do and I don’t want to launch an attack) but there is no way on earth that you know Craig and Marc do because this is unverifiable without a quantifiable test with all parties involved. You have no way of knowing what they forgot, knew initially, or what the people at the “title company” actually know.

    Again this is putting your confidence in a 3rd party without knowing all the facts of all parties involved. A VERY BAD and UNSAFE Practice.

    Due Diligence people and the more people tell you they know I have found it to mean they have many insecurities and THIS should wave a red flag.

    Now more importantly GO HAWKS and I have to put a game plan together for 3 different basketball teams this Saturday because its QUITE POSSIBLE the other Coach knows MORE then I do. But, I wouldn’t bet on it!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  57. 57

    By ARDELL @ 55:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 51 – Why do you keep saying that when several people have already pointed out that you are INCORRECT about representing me in that manner?

    Yes…I would punch you right in the nose and yes it would be worth a few days in jail to do it.

    I don’t really care that several morons gave it a thumbs down. That doesn’t mean what I said is wrong. But in any case, how is it incorrect? Here’s the bulk of your how to rip off the elderly post:

    I don’t do this and never have done it, but I know a lot of guys who buy houses cheap and flip them around the Country. They drive around in GOOD areas, the best areas even. They look for signs of someone not having enough money to keep up with their homes. Patched roof, tall grass, weeds, gutters hanging down, fence pieces missing and fence leaning over.

    Then they knock on the door and hand the people a written offer. Let’s say the house is worth $550,000. They offer them $400,000. Oh…and it has to be someone with equity. So they look for OLD people who have owned their home a long time and maybe have no mortgage at all. But from the look of the place, they are having a hard time just paying the electric bill.

    . . .

    So the first step is get a real estate license. You can’t be in the business of buying and flipping using agents. You need a license or you waste too much money on the in and out fees and don’t have ready access to all the info you need.

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2013/01/07/nwmls-2012-ends-on-a-sour-note-for-buyers/comment-page-1/#comment-185773

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  58. 58

    By ARDELL @ 55:

    Yes…I would punch you right in the nose and yes it would be worth a few days in jail to do it.

    Clearly you have anger problems based on the PITA response the other night. No surprise there.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  59. 59
    ARDELL says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 57

    Kary, you just don’t understand real estate…or people either. MANY elderly people have what you might call a “hoarder house” with mold issues and lots of deferred maintenance. The discount for them leaving all their problems behind is LARGE and the job of not leaving all their problems behind is just too much for them to deal with.

    My Mom is one of them and yes…sometimes family or caring people can get the house up to less of a discount. I just did one for a stranger and yes the buyer still got a screaming deal and the owner received $42,000 vs the zero from the offer she had in hand before someone told her to call me before taking that net zero offer.

    I don’t know why you insist on casting me in a poor light. It’s obviously not true. NOT A ONE of my clients has written something bad about me, and they easily could. YOU are the only one who does and I have never met you. It really is slander and you know it. You are “presuming facts not in evidence” and I may have to hire a good attorney to sue your ass. But I’d rather just punch you in the nose and be done with it.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  60. 60
    ARDELL says:

    Question: When Kary has destroyed SB to the point where he is the ONLY one posting comments…getting close to that now…will Kary still talk to himself?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  61. 61

    RE: ARDELL @ 59 – Wow, you think I’ve never seen that type of condition? One of my listings with that type of condition made the Detrimental Listings Photo thread.

    But quit trying to change the facts. Your hypothetical said the house was worth $550,000 and they were offering $400,000. Do I need to quote it again? $150,000 to move junk out seems like quite a bit.

    Fess up, you said something stupid in that post not realizing what you were saying because you’re ignorant of the types of concerns the distressed property law can present. No changing the facts or changing the example can change that. You’re dangerous because you don’t understand but insist that you do.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  62. 62

    By ARDELL @ 60:

    Question: When Kary has destroyed SB to the point where he is the ONLY one posting comments…getting close to that now…will Kary still talk to himself?

    So you’re talking to yourself, presenting a hypothetical where I’d be talking to myself?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  63. 63
    ARDELL says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 61

    Kary…add some cat piss all over the carpet because old people have old cats, sometimes lots of them. I had one with a parrot that pecked holes in all the walls plus a dog that never got let out and pooped and peed by the front door for months hoping to be let out, but sadly no.

    You have not been in real estate long enough to know what I know and see what I have seen.

    Now let’s get REAL real for a minute. Every freakin’ day HERE and NOW someone picks up a house for $250k at auction and puts it back on market at $400 to $500 or more after doing a quick rehab. Every Day!

    Houses worth $500k sell for $245k at auction all the time! Get real pal…this is the real world of real estate. It is not a scandal a scheme or an anomaly. Get your head out of your butt.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  64. 64

    By ARDELL @ 63:

    Get your head out of your butt.

    Ardell, STFU. You can change your facts all you want, but that doesn’t change what you said in the first place.

    This isn’t Rain City Guide where you can just insult someone and then place them on moderation. I answered your question and you called me a PITA. Now you’re telling me to pull my head out of my ass. You don’t know what you’re talking about, as is common with you. Do I need to pull the list of things you don’t know squat about? How about the one where you thought you would have to sign something agreeing to spy on your own client to complete a short sale? No one else agreed with you, so what do you do, write a blog piece on how right you are! Classic Ardell. 100% wrong, but too golly stupid to realize it.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  65. 65

    Just stop. Insults don’t have to responded to with insults. You don’t have to tell people to STFU or to call them stupid. Seattle Bubble should be about intelligent discourse, not name calling. When there’s an abundance of name calling and insults it tends to drive everyone else away. It’s not good for Seattle Bubble, and it’s not good for the blood pressure.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  66. 66
    ARDELL says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 64

    Kary,

    Sometimes there is a difference of opinion without a clear right vs wrong. Often even. Every discussion doesn’t have to be a game of King of the Hill.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  67. 67

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 65:

    Just stop. Insults don’t have to responded to with insults.

    You deal with the Internet the way you do, and I’ll do it the way I do. If I was anonymous I’d let it pass. But I’m not going to let someone insult me in public, particularly a stupid agent, and have them get away with it unscathed. That applies to both Ardell and Losh. I’m going to point out how stupid and ignorant they are, and how they don’t know squat about much of anything.

    Go back and read what started this nonsense. Ardell described a stupid get rich scheme that rips off the elderly. I pointed out that possibly had distressed property law implications, but noted the “financial distress” factor might be lacking. She ignored that and asked how there could be financial distress. I answered, quoting the statute, and she called me a PITA. I guess I should have just responded that she’s a STM and left it at that.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  68. 68

    By ARDELL @ 66:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 64

    Kary,

    Sometimes there is a difference of opinion without a clear right vs wrong. Often even. Every discussion doesn’t have to be a game of King of the Hill.

    That’s true, but not in this case. My position was that there was a legal risk, but not that it was clearly illegal. Clearly there’s a risk. Even Marc was eager to sue any such buyer. That was my point–that it was a risk. All you’ve done is deny that, try to say you said something else, and insult me.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  69. 69

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 67
    I probably shouldn’t even ask. What’s an STM?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  70. 70
    wreckingbull says:

    This is like a Discovery Channel show.

    WHEN REALTORS ATTACK

    Also reminds me of my Siamese Fighting Fish I had in college. You basically buy these little clear plastic chambers for them in the tank, so they don’t tear each other to shreds. Until that fateful night where you had ten too many beers and let them loose on each other.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  71. 71
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 67

    I’ve been in the Real Estate business a really long time, and have seen plenty of attorneys come, and go.

    You are a special case. When you’re caught you insult, then turn it around, say something else, then want to debate symantics.

    You have a lack of knowledge, professionalism, and ability, yet here you are all day every day giving your opinions.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  72. 72
    David Losh says:

    There was some speculation that Kary chased me off, but that wasn’t the case.

    What stopped me coming here was the day Corndogs engaged Ira with insults that included calling him semi black.

    Ira is the nicest person you will ever meet, and when those comments by Corndogs were allowed to stand, and were not moderated by Tim, it crossed the line.

    In my opinion, this site has become as dead as the Rain City Guide. The charts are great, Tableau is great, some of the posts are good, but all in all the site is just rehashing the same old stuff.

    Thanks

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  73. 73
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 69 – I believe it means “Sexually Titillating Mama.”

    I have no doubt Kary has a GIANT boner for Ardell. I just read all this crap and its pure sexual frustration causing this dilemma between all of them. I say Kary, Dave, Ardell, Corn Dogs, and Pegasus spend an evening together at the Redmond Ranch so they can discuss how they REALLY feel: http://www.eros-events.org/#About Us

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  74. 74

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 69:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 67
    I probably shouldn’t even ask. What’s an STM?

    A typo. It should be SFM.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  75. 75

    By David Losh @ 71:

    When you’re caught you insult, then turn it around, say something else, then want to debate symantics.

    The Black Knight returns!

    http://www.delvedigger.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Black-Knight-monty-python-300×165.jpg

    How was I caught? You’ve certainly never caught me at anything, but when you lose an argument you say “I’m toast.” Ardell here described a scheme to rip off old people. I explained concerns about the distressed property law. Ardell then attacked.

    I’m sorry, but the only person who turned this around, said something else and then wanted to debate with “symantics” was Ardell.

    If Ardell had any decency she would let Craig and Marc know who these people are so that they can investigate and contact the sellers if the conduct was in fact actionable. Instead, she’s trying to teach others how to be involved in the same questionable conduct. Sickening.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  76. 76
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 75

    I had time to read the other comment thread and will adderss you there.

    You are insane.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  77. 77

    By David Losh @ 76:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 75

    I had time to read the other comment thread and will adderss you there.

    You are insane.

    What’s the point of this post?

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  78. 78
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 77

    Now, I know you’ve already responded to the other comment thread so what’s the point of this commnet?

    I’ve got all day for you.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  79. 79

    David Losh said “Ira is the nicest person you will ever meet.”
    See? Like I said, David sometimes does come up with amazingly truthful statements.
    As far as Corndogs goes, I am aware that people read this. After engaging him a few times, I have no problem with him feeling like he defeated me with his great oratorical skills. I’m just not going to respond to him anymore because I believe in intelligent conversation, and one is not going to get that with Corndogs. I’m no longer going to stoop to his level and subject everyone else here to ignorant moron blather. I’m just not going to part of that. He can call me whatever he wants, I don’t feel this urgency to defend my honor.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  80. 80
    ray pepper says:

    Corn Dog and Pegasus are a riot. I miss alot of their posts but the ones I catch are funny as hell. Losh is great as well so come on people don’t leave or get angry. Also, the other guy who gets Tim cranky is VERY funny. He is always whited out. Forgot his name. The guy that kept bringing up all the pedophiles in Everett…

    I know if we were all together, with beers in hand, watching the Hawks this Sunday, you all would be holding hands and singing together by the end of the game. yes, this includes Ardell and Kary too!

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

  81. 81
    ARDELL says:

    RE: ray pepper @ 80

    I think his name is Michael B.

    Rate this comment: Thumb up 0

Leave a Reply

Use your email address to sign up with Gravatar for a custom avatar.
Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Please read the rules before posting a comment.