Weekly Twitter Digest (Link Roundup) for 2013-01-18

  

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

5 comments:

  1. 1

    Harney’s take on the supply/demand/inventory situation nationally.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/homesrealestate/2020157737_hreharney20xml.html

    Not one of his better pieces.

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  2. 2
    Lo Ball Jones says:

    I guess I’m not seeing the demand for all this urban vertical density.

    The whole thing is a lot of pump priming by the top feeders licking each others paws. So Amazon..a company with no profit margin…builds a corporate headquarters in an expensive downtown and then Vulcan builds the cheaply made yet expensive housing for them.

    It’s basically just a recast of the old Company Town as Seattle walls up and makes itself less accessible with high parking rates and more taxes, fees and tolls. Only problem is when the money machine that is creating the juice for all these schemes runs out of gas.

    The side effect is turning potential home owners into wage slaves dependent on Democrats for their daily dose of light rail to get them to a cubicle, so no wonder they’re on board with apodments and other Habitrail living.

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  3. 3
    David Losh says:

    I like South Lake Union, and the way it’s shaping up.

    Ballard, Fremont, and Pioneer Square are good examples of where Seattle just doesn’t have the historical preservation ability some other cities, like Boston, do.

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  4. 4
    calvin mccomfrey says:

    New case of alleged farud:

    http://www.windermerewatch.com/index.html#TopReportsLineup

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  5. 5

    RE: calvin mccomfrey @ 4 – IF the alleged facts are true, seems like a slam dunk against the sellers. Not clear for the other parties.

    I’m having a hard time understanding though why you would close on a transaction where there was an open question as to whether the septic inspection had been done, and how you would get the loan if the loan officer was asking for such a document.

    The only other thing I would add is I always advise clients to show up for the septic pumping so that they can see firsthand and ask questions. Relying on a written report for such things isn’t a good thing, IMHO.

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