Posted by: Timothy Ellis (The Tim)

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

51 responses to “Case-Shiller: Seattle Home Prices Dip to Close 2012”

  1. Marc

    8.6% YOY is pretty impressive by historical standards but looking at the relative flatness of the rewound chart over the last several months of 2012 and the .5% decrease M2M just does not gel with my current experience in the Seattle and Bellevue markets. For most of last year it seemed like a difficult market for buyers due to the low inventory and multiple offer scenarios. But 2013 seems even worse. It’s just brutal and I’ve advised several clients to not even look at brand new listings on the MLS for the next month or two in hopes that inventory will improve as we get into spring.

    I think the level of buyer desperation is extremely high right now. My hope is that it’s peaking and will moderate as the most desperate buyers clear themselves out of the market by bidding up and buying over priced turds. Then, later this spring (or more likely summer) inventory will be better (but still not great) and buyers can take a somewhat more reasoned, less manic approach.

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  2. softwarengineer

    Yun Speaks Out of Both Sides of His Mouth

    “..“The recovery is occurring despite excessively tight credit conditions and higher down-payment requirements, which are negating the impact of record high affordability conditions,” Yun said….”

    http://freeutahhomesearch.com/fine/real/estate/blog

    On the Other Hand, To Quote Tim Ellis:

    “….People who bought five, six, seven years ago, who in an ordinary market would be today’s sellers, are stuck. They can’t afford to sell,” said Tim Ellis, an analyst with national brokerage firm Redfin. “There’s hardly any market where prices aren’t 20% lower than in 2005, 2006 and 2007.”…”

    “…Why this doesn’t mean a recovery

    Some believe that these shortages, as well as any subsequent rise in prices, are likely temporary. “There is a whole mess of inventory out there-it’s just not listed for sale yet,” said Michael Feder, chief executive of Radar Logic. Radar Logic’s Residential Property Index tracks daily home prices in 25 major housing markets.

    “That’s why we don’t buy the idea that we’re on the verge of a recovery. Any meaningful strength [in home prices] is going to bring out this inventory and will crush the recovery,” Feder said….”

    http://www.realestateabc.com/insights/shrinking-housing-inventory.htm

    .

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  3. Rob Engle

    Lumping all of “Seattle Area” home prices into one statistic is like lumping all mammals into one survey to measure their intelligence.
    Then you average the intelligence of humans alongside that of porcupines, bears, elephants, manatees, armadillos, bushbabies, bats, pikas, flying lemurs and….. hedgehogs.
    Where home prices are trending in Queen Anne or Capitol Hill has very little relevance to what is going on in Lake City, Rainier Beach or Renton.

    Although I’d be very interested to know how I stack up against a hedgehog. Those little buggers are resourceful!
    Case-Shiller, can you help me out?? ;-)

    Here’s a European hedgehog. Notice the more refined quills and the aire of….. superiority.
    But scientists at Case-Shiller have reported that they have a tendency toward:
    SOCIALISM.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Igel.JPG

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  4. singliac

    Marc, I really hope you’re right. I wish we had something better to go on than a hunch, but I really hope that inventory improves. After 6 years of reading this blog, I’m ready to pull the trigger.

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  5. Steve Tytler

    As I published in my newspaper column (Everett Herald) at the end of last year, I expect Puget Sound area home prices to appreciate 10% or more this year on average (some neighborhoods will appreciate more, some less).

    We finally hit the long-awaited housing “bottom” last year.

    We are now back to a “normal” real estate market driven by supply and demand rather than easy credit. The “housing bubble” was really a “credit bubble” that severely distorted the normal market forces in real estate.

    I believe we are now back to our typical stair-step pattern of housing appreciation in this area where we have 2-3 years of relatively steep home appreciation followed by a few years of a “flat” housing market (little to no appreciation).

    The very limited supply of homes for sale this year means only one thing: higher prices.

    If you are thinking about buying a home, NOW is the time to buy! You don’t hear me say that very often. I think the last time was in 2000 or 2001.

    Mortgage rates are as low as they are going to get, home prices are as low as they are going to get, this is a limited window of opportunity.

    Those of you who have been waiting/hoping for the housing market to “crash” now need to adjust to the fact the worst is over and home prices are headed back up.

    Eventually, home prices in this area will equal or exceed the peak home values of the last housing boom, it’s just a matter of time.

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  6. wreckingbull

    By Steve Tytler @ 5:

    Those of you who have been waiting/hoping for the housing market to “crash” now need to adjust to the fact the worst is over and home prices are headed back up.

    Steve, I think you are a bit behind the times with that statement. That was the theme around here 2-3 years ago. I rarely see it here anymore. I think the larger concerns are:

    1. When and how Inventory will return to normal levels.
    2. What effect rising interest rates will have on prices.

    Eventually, home prices in this area will equal or exceed the peak home values of the last housing boom, it’s just a matter of time.

    Very apt use of weasel words. I assure you, eventually, that statement will be correct.

    Your words sound more like those of a real estate and mortgage broker than those of a journalist. Pick the first two or the third. How you can try to present yourself as all three with a straight face is beyond my comprehension.

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  7. Marc

    Ray, Ray, Ray, your boy’s back, your boy’s back!!!

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  8. Steve Tytler

    wreckingball,

    You make a fair comment.

    I should have clarified that I think home prices will reach or exceed the 2007 peak values within the next 5-10 years. It’s hard to know exactly when that will happen, but all it takes is 2-3 years of 10%+ appreciation per year, which could easily happen over the next couple of years depending on the supply-demand ratio of listings for sale.

    That comment was in response to many I read here in the past who thought that prices would “never” get that high again. But you are right, I have not read this blog for a long time so I may be out of touch.

    And to answer your question, I was a TV news reporter for 13 years and I have been writing my newspaper column for more than 23 years. I have been a professional journalist much longer than I have been a real estate and mortgage broker.

    My record speaks for itself. No other real estate commentator in this area has been as accurate about the real estate market as I have been over the past 20+ years.

    The reason I posted here is that I think this is a historic opportunity to buy a home for a great price with extremely low interest rates before housing prices take off again.

    I told my wife the same thing in 1996 when we bought our current home. Today it is worth about 3x what we paid for it, even after the fall from its peak value in 2007. I also said the same thing back in 1989 when I bought the rental properties that I still own today, which are worth several times what I paid for them.

    These opportunities come around about once every 7-10 years and you need to take advantage of them.

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  9. Sparky

    By Steve Tytler @ 5:

    As I published in my newspaper column (Everett Herald) at the end of last year, I expect Puget Sound area home prices to appreciate 10% or more this year on average (some neighborhoods will appreciate more, some less).

    We finally hit the long-awaited housing “bottom” last year.

    We are now back to a “normal” real estate market driven by supply and demand rather than easy credit. The “housing bubble” was really a “credit bubble” that severely distorted the normal market forces in real estate.

    I believe we are now back to our typical stair-step pattern of housing appreciation in this area where we have 2-3 years of relatively steep home appreciation followed by a few years of a “flat” housing market (little to no appreciation).

    The very limited supply of homes for sale this year means only one thing: higher prices.

    If you are thinking about buying a home, NOW is the time to buy! You don’t hear me say that very often. I think the last time was in 2000 or 2001.

    Mortgage rates are as low as they are going to get, home prices are as low as they are going to get, this is a limited window of opportunity.

    Those of you who have been waiting/hoping for the housing market to “crash” now need to adjust to the fact the worst is over and home prices are headed back up.

    Eventually, home prices in this area will equal or exceed the peak home values of the last housing boom, it’s just a matter of time.

    Oh no, I’d better buy NOW, otherwise, I’m going to get priced out forever! Wreckingbull brings up two really good questions, and the ones that keep me out of the market for the moment.

    I see another Friday Flashback in our future…

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2012/06/15/friday-flashback-you-will-never-see-a-major-housing-price-crash-here/

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  10. corndogs

    RE: Steve Tytler @ 8 – Steve, there are people on this Site that called the bottom of this market last year and put down a chunk of change to put their money where their mouth is. What did you buy? If you didn’t buy last year you already missed out. So don’t come on here trying to be big ball boy. If you bought something share, otherwise go polish your knob in private.

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  11. Marc

    RE: singliac @ 4 – Fight the urge. I know that’s often easier said than done but try. And when you do jump at least make sure it’s for a house that really hits all your key criteria. Paying top dollar and “settling” for a house that is barely “good enough” is a recipe for a very disappointing next several years.

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  12. ray pepper

    You know Steve you remind me of a dairy cow. Not because of your girth, because we both appear to be slightly obese, but because of your EXCITEMENT to see people BUY BUY BUY..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2H-ZNfhxbs&NR=1&feature=endscreen

    I don’t like any “professional” in the field to advise anyone that a particular time is right to do anything. Its based on so many factors at a given time for the family or person. There is ALWAYS GEMS in a given market and currently the majority I find at Trustee Sales. King and Pierce unloading 50+ properties a week is staggering. Bidding wars are an INSANE way to BUY ANYTHING!

    Bubble heads, let me be your voice of reason. There is NO RUSH to buy anything. There is still so many homes coming back, and people BURIED in their properties, that time is on your side. Always look and listen to nobody who tells YOU how to spend YOUR money!

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  13. Scotsman

    Yeah Steve, now is the time to buy. I’d suggest ya take every penny you can find and leverage up to the max. Maybe form an informal partnership with a few friends and family members- get them to leverage up as much as possible too. Then check back in 4-5 years and tell us how you’ve done. I’ll be rooting for ya! /

    You certainly have a binary perspective on the markets- but instead of one or zero you see 1 or I-1I. It’s either a good time to buy, or a great time to buy. Given your profession I guess that’s expected, but you could at least try to couch it in a small dose of precautionary realism now and then. You’ve somehow managed to become a caricature of yourself. In a perverse way I have to admire that.

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  14. 2kt

    RE: ray pepper @ 12

    Raymundo! How about those great predictions of yours about 10 years of declines?
    They are all coming back at higher prices!

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  15. TOP

    Marc: ” … Paying top dollar and “settling” for a house that is barely “good enough” is a recipe for a very disappointing next several years. ” <<< +10.

    People are buying out of fear again specially when they see the properties has appreciated 10% or more in the last two years. Right now it is a perfect market for the sellers. They can get top dollars if the properties are in decent conditions.

    It is funny how there was not enough buyers three years ago and there is not enough sellers now.

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  16. Ray pepper

    RE: 2kt @ 14 – 10 years of declines? That’s in your head. Homes down 50 to 70 percent don’t drop for a decade. I will say it again. They are all coming back this decade and through short sale, foreclosure, deed in lieu, mortgage cram down, and convention sale all the home values will reflect their current market value. In this decade of giveback it’s insane to remain an upside down bag holder. Get with program 2kt and stop crying. Join the millions of Americans who made and are making the right decision.

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  17. Ira Sacharoff

    Is it just me, or does it occur to anyone else that Steve Tytler and Corndogs might be the same person? They both brag about how brilliant they are and how they’re never wrong.
    While Corndogs insults anyone who remotely disagrees with them, seems to very proud of being an a hole, puts others down who brag about their success because they can’t possibly be as brilliant as he is, and who would appear to have had a very difficult childhood and possibly five marriages, maybe as his Steve Tytler personna he constrains his craziness, but can’t constrain broadcasting about how right he is all the time.

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  18. One Eyed Man

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 17

    Not the same person Ira, but maybe twin sons from different mothers. The apparent facts are more than a little ironic. Give me a call and I’ll fill you in if you’re interested.

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  19. ARDELL

    A useful tool to gauge how many potential buyers you have to run through to get to a more balanced market in your area of interest. Redfin’s # of views and # of saved as favorites appears to be a good guide as to how many offers may end up in play. Technically those who marked it as an “x-out” are also buyers in play, not for that house, but for the area and price range generally.

    The # of total views has some significance, but not as telling as the other categories.

    I have been tracking this for some time and 750 total views with 75 saving as a favorite and 20 discarding the property results in multiple offers with no inspection contingency. That gives us 95 potential buyers for that home (not 750) and only one getting it.

    Another, and probably the most dramatic one I have seen since 1/1/2013 had 29 offers. The Redfin publicly viewable stats on that home has 1,968 views and 147 favorited plus 35 x-outs. That gives you 182 people potentially looking for a similar home and 28 people who went all the way to making an offer and didn’t get the house. The home had 91 saving it as a favorite within the first 24 hours or less.

    How much would inventory have to increase to balance out your area of interest? Working through to the end of those 28 buyers…or 181 potential buyers…not likely going to happen this year.

    Looking at another less favored area and a property that went pending quickly. 420 views, 27 favorited and 9 x-outs. All things being equal as to % of increase in inventory in all areas, this area is more likely to come into balance before those with over a hundred potential buyers noting their interest on the Redfin site.

    When you take into consideration the number of buyers not using the Redfin site and/or not registering their position on the home on the Redfin site, you have to conclude that there are many more potential buyers than those appearing on that site.

    It doesn’t look possible to see a balanced market between buyers and sellers with that many buyers in play, even if inventory quadrupled from it’s current position.

    Not an exact science, but doing a spread sheet on these newly available stats for your zip codes of interest would likely be worth doing, for those waiting for more balance in the marketplace. You should at least track if those numbers are moving higher or lower as to direction the market is trending.

    Tracking inventory alone doesn’t tell you as much as noting whether the potential buyers for that zip code are increasing or dwindling. It’s a very useful tool.

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  20. wreckingbull

    EVERYONE!!!!! BUY, BUY, BUY, SHE IS ABOUT TO BLOW! BUY THAT TICKET NOW! Oh wait, this sounds vaguely familiar…..

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2006/10/20/didnt-buy-their-ticket-on-the-last-spaceship-flight-off-a-planet-thats-about-to-explode/

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  21. Plymster

    RE: ARDELL @ 19 – I’d be careful with those stats. Redfin “favorites” can be anyone.

    For example, I’m not looking for a home right now, but I mark all active listings in the area I’d consider buying in as Favorites, so I can track how quickly they end up in pending status. I “x-out” all pendings in the area so I can track how frequently they return to active status or see them when they show up in “sold” status.

    Then if you take the number of realtors, would-be realtors, economic hobbyists, and lookie-loos out there, the stats become meaningless. The number of Redfin Tours indicates to me a slice of how many people are actually interested enough to visit., and that’s always an order of magnitude less than the favorites + x-outs.

    It’s also interesting to look at the agent comments where they have interesting stats like number of offers, average down payment, and anecdotal offer info from the agents. For example, looking at Seattle’s anecdotal info, it sounds like there are a lot of all cash buyers out there jumping on $600-700k homes, but when you go down to the “Seattle Market Trends”, it appears to be all hype, as the sold price appears to be plummetting lately, but the listing price is shooting the moon (a 10-20k discrepancy has widened to ~50k in the last month).

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  22. banjo country

    RE: wreckingbull @ 20
    For the love of God, do not board a spaceship where the porter is holding a book called ‘To Serve Man’.

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  23. Mike

    RE: ARDELL @ 19 – I too would be hesitant to use the redfin “favorites” and x-outs to determine demand. Sure there’s a pattern, but it may not be buyers.

    Personally I favorite both “desirable” and “undesirable” houses nearby me to get a feel for what is selling, how fast and at what price. This didn’t change after we bought, and my interest now is determining when might be a good time to refinance.

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  24. Mike

    RE: Plymster @ 21 – You bring up a lot of good points. In addition to the agent comments, the other interesting bit I found is the market stats with % down payment for a given area. I don’t have a sense to how accurate this information is (RedFin is guilty of reporting some information with serious statistical inaccuracies!) but it’s often what you’d expect.

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  25. ARDELL

    RE: Plymster @ 21

    I don’t track all areas Plymster, but for The Eastside close in Zip Codes, they are fairly accurate. Seattle is a little harder to track as the properties are not often represented well via the internet display. The Eastside being more homogeneous is easier to track.

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  26. ARDELL

    RE: Mike @ 23

    I use the feature when I list a property, and the earliest numbers are the most accurate for me. If the first 6 views equal 5 or 6 favorite it, then I’m usually well on the way to an offer. Those who are responding to instant alert in the first hour, and for the first 12 hours, are very meaningful to me, given the online presentation is my job.

    The stats tend to become meaningless the longer the property is online, especially if a majority of the information was gathered while it was in pending status.

    We have an internal counter as well in the mls, but we can only see our own listings there. The public stats help me set my expectations properly.

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  27. Mike

    RE: ARDELL @ 26

    Hmmm… post something misleading then return with the “correct” meaning after people take the bait. Ok…

    “I have been tracking this for some time and 750 total views with 75 saving as a favorite and 20 discarding the property results in multiple offers with no inspection contingency. That gives us 95 potential buyers for that home (not 750) and only one getting it.”

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  28. Erik

    RE: corndog @ 10 -
    I couldn’t reply on the last post cause i ran out of comments so I hunted you down so I can reply.

    I will have 42 credits at UW after this quarter and can get a degree at a real school. At this point we are taking the school comments off the table because I will have a real degree in a month. You’ll have to find new material.

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  29. ARDELL

    RE: Mike @ 27

    I was talking about a specific property for which that is true, same with the second example. those are both factual examples. How you personally do or do not use the information has to come from your own data gatherings.

    I am always talking about areas where I work and track on a regular basis. Your mileage may vary. Try it. Let us know how it works for you. But don’t knock it til you’ve tried it.

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  30. ARDELL

    RE: Mike @ 27

    I was talking about a specific property for which that is true, same with the second example. those are both factual examples. How you personal do or do not use the information has to come from your own data gatherings.

    I am always talking about areas where I work and track on a regular basis. Your mileage may vary. Try it. Let us know how it works for you. But don’t knock it til you’ve tried it.

    The 10% rule of thumb in the first 24 hours I have tested repeatedly, and it seems to hold true. I would not post it here if it were a one time fluke example.

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  31. S-Crow

    RE: Steve Tytler @ 5 – the idea this market is normal “supply & demand” is absurd. I would argue that the market is heavily “subsidized” by the Fed with both low rates and “allowing” people to refi underwater homes via DU REFI Plus, Open access, HARP/MHA programs. There’s a reason for low inventory and sellers sitting on the sidelines. There’s a reason for rediculously low interest rates. There’s a reason for having .gov programs in assisting people in refinancing their exceptionally levered homes. And, I keep writing checks for several grand to homeowners as “selling incentivized” payments from various banks. Remove those and you’ll have a “normal market.”

    S-Crow

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  32. Mike

    RE: ARDELL @ 30RE: ARDELL @ 30

    To post 7 paragraphs, then return to say “well, actually what I said only makes sense if you take into account some other critical aspect I neglected to mention” is disingenuous.

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  33. Erik

    RE: Steve Tytler @ 5
    Do you have a brother named Bill Hutchinson?

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2013/02/15/friday-flashback-what-more-can-you-ask-for/

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  34. Erik

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 18
    Steve Tytler’s brother is Bill Hutchinson.
    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2013/02/15/friday-flashback-what-more-can-you-ask-for/

    Corndogs is the angry cousin. There is something seriously wrong with the entire family… most likely bad parenting.

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  35. Azucar

    By Steve Tytler @ 8:

    wreckingball,

    My record speaks for itself. No other real estate commentator in this area has been as accurate about the real estate market as I have been over the past 20+ years.

    I guess The Tim doesn’t count since he hasn’t been running this site for 20 years…

    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2007/05/23/a-conversation-with-steve-tytler/

    Did you ever buy him that beer that you owe him over the following bet?

    Steve T. in 2007: “I expect the housing market to be flat for the next few years. I do NOT expect to see 20%+ price drops as we have seen in other previously housing markets around the country.”.. “You can save this email and throw it back in my face 5 years from now if I am wrong, but I’ll bet you a beer that I’m right. : )”

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  36. Ray pepper

    Tytler is evidence enough to me that the Everett Herald is not long to survive. If this conceited buffoon gets air time in Everett then I pity all the readers for possibly listening to him.

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  37. Erik

    RE: Azucar @ 35
    Great find! Is this the biggest fool to ever be on this website? Maybe it’s a joke? This is a perfect example why you don’t listen to the media when it comes to real estate. There are a bunch of them writing and reporting that are really just a bunch of big stupid blow hards.

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  38. Chuck C

    But wait, didn’t he help Dori Monson (KIRO radio) refinance his home something like 5 times in the last 3 years???? That’s according to the radio ad anyway….. Either Dori is an idiot or Steve is paying him a lot of coin to sound like one.

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  39. corndogs

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 17 – That kinda pissed me off. I almost felt compelled to explain that I didn’t have a difficult childhood or 5 marriages…Not bad at all Ira.

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  40. Topdog

    Steve Tytler said:
    “If you are thinking about buying a home, NOW is the time to buy! You don’t hear me say that very often. I think the last time was in 2000 or 2001.”

    Clearly objective analysis, not the least influenced by his Best Mortgage business.

    May 2007 Steve Tytler said
    “You will never see a major housing price crash here. I know, because I have been waiting for one for more than 20 years! I’ve always dreamed of cashing on a housing bust so that I could pick up a couple rental houses on the cheap, but it has never happened.”
    http://seattlebubble.com/blog/2007/05/23/a-conversation-with-steve-tytler/

    Can anyone dare suggest pumping?

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  41. corndogs

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 18 – “The apparent facts are more than a little ironic.” One Ball Man, when you believe two things are very similar, the term is not ironic. An example of irony would be Ira criticizing Corndog for being insulting while calling Corndog an a hole. Or when Wreckedbung makes a post indicating that Bubble bloggers are not doomsayers who hope the market will crash but than later makes a post saying it’s time to buy using angry sarcasm and citing posts from 2006… Or the fact that the 5 post rule was implemented to limit the number of comments between Losh and Krismer, but in practice it’s actually only restricting people who never posed a problem in the first place. You see One Ball, there’s a lot of irony when you deal with less intelligent people because it’s about comical inconsistencies, not similarities.

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  42. softwarengineer

    RE: corndog @ 10

    If You Didn’t Buy Last Year You Missed Out?

    Corndogs, you sound just like the folks not on Social Security and allege Social Security is horrifying and must be privatized [eliminated]….meanwhile, those alternate like 401Ks to Social Security have tanked to 0% interest. Even a thousand or two a month from Social Security is equal to like a million or two in a 401K…practically no one’s saved that much [the avg savings for retirement over age 50 is like $52K]…..making Social Security CLEARLY the annuity winner in America.

    You dogmatic bottom callers make me laugh….like Tyler, your odds of guessing correctly in this overpopulated world out of resources [money], is worse than expecting big wins at Las Vegas….

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  43. softwarengineer

    RE: S-Crow @ 31

    Yes S-Crow

    The blind bottom callers conveniently omit all the Middle Class welfare in real estate lately.

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  44. Ira Sacharoff

    RE: Corndogs @ 41
    I would never call corndogs an a hole. That’s not my style. I merely stated that he seemed very proud of being an a hole.

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  45. One Eyed Man

    RE: Corndogs @ 41

    The irony Jason, lies in the fact that you feel the need to find faulty with someone like Tytler with whom (as Ira points out) you seem to have so much in common. It would appear from comment 10 that you agree with the substance of Tytler’s comment, but rather than directly acknowledging that, you instead assert that you are superior to him because, unlike you, he probably didn’t take action based upon your shared opinion. Unlike you Jason, most of us are interested primarily in the substantive issue related to real estate rather than whether you might be superior or inferior to anyone else who takes part in this Blog.

    But I also find more than a little irony in your continuing pre-occupation with some personal need to count my genitalia. While I might gernerally feel that stooping to your level with a responsive comment concerning that subject would be beneath me, your continuing comments make it clear that that’s exactly where you’ve been. I know its difficult for you to ignore your natural urges but in the future if you feel the need to count something, you might want to relate it to real estate (the subject of this blog) as I’d prefer that you keep your face farther away from my crotch. No need to use up one of your 5 posts to respond to me because if I wanted any further lip from you I’d unzip my zipper.

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  46. corndogs

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 44 – No one has used the word ‘a hole’ at all except you IRA. Corndog has never used the word ‘a hole’ on this site…. Corndogs style would be to come up with something imaginative that would make a few people laugh. No Ira, it’s your style, you should be proud of it, you are getting more and more like Corndog all the time.

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  47. Azucar

    By corndogs @ 46:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 44 – No one has used the word ‘a hole’ at all except you IRA. Corndog has never used the word ‘a hole’ on this site…. Corndogs style would be to come up with something imaginative that would make a few people laugh. No Ira, it’s your style, you should be proud of it, you are getting more and more like Corndog all the time.

    You don’t have to use the word a hole to make people think you are one or are proud of being one. I don’t know why you would imply that just because you’ve never used the term you’re not one and not proud of being one.

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  48. David Losh

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 45

    Who is Jason?

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  49. One Eyed Man

    RE: David Losh @ 48

    “Who is Jason?”

    Perhaps a great existential question for Corndog. But for you and I, the answer is probably limited to the Pierce County public records. Although I suppose we could drop by his house and invite him to have a beer at The Tides and ask him in person seeing as he’s told us where he lives.

    The Tim graciously preserves ones anonymity if one so desires. This presumably encourages participation in the discussion. Unfortunately it also limits personal accountability for how one treats other participants.

    (Have you also noticed that there’s both a “corndog” and a “corndogs”? I assume they are the same person using two different email accounts or internet devices, however, I guess perhaps they could be multiple parties using a single alias similar in form to the allegations about the identity of Tyler Durden.)

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  50. David Losh

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 49

    Yeah, OK but the comments are so confusing that I don’t really keep track. The property purchase he first bragged about seems to be different from the story he is now telling, but there again it makes no difference to me.

    The only point is that no discussion is advanced by insulting people, and that got to be the recurring theme here. No one needs to be called stupid for asking questions, or told they are a moron when the opinions they have are different from another commenter.

    I just think corndog, or corndogs is one of those things blogs tolerate for entertainment value as Ray so encourages.

    I hope this site will continue to evolve because it is on all the cutting edges of blogging. I keep track of blog site. If you look at what Dustin Luther did with his WordPress site it is the first site that used a theme that was so user-friendly. I asked, he told me the theme, and I used it. It worked out great. I had spent $700 with a WordPress consultant over a couple of months, but did more in four hours on my own working the theme Dustin suggested.

    Now for here, Tim uses the charts, and graphs as content which is exceptional, and everything the direction of blogging is going. We commnet on the content which is quick, and easy to read.

    I would like to see more people comment and some thoughtful exchanges. The home buying experience is really stressful today.

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  51. ray pepper

    I don’t encourage anyone to do anything. If I’m wrong I want someone to blast me a new a-hole. Corndogs come at me!! I’ve been blasted since 2006 when we started 500 Realty so I have thick skin. I was blasted in 2009 until about a year ago when I advised people to not be BRAIN-DEAD and STOP CRYING about how upside down they were and what they should do about it.

    I spent 1 hour last night BLASTING the managers at a Nissan Dealership. Stupid people drive me nutts. Lying Stupid people really gets me charged up!

    As for the vulgarity I love it. I’m sorry I just do. Maybe its all the Coaching I do..and all the screaming! I don’t know. So when someone comes along like MichaelB or CornDogs the comedy is priceless. I don’t like “STFU”…That has no comedic value…But, some of the one liners posted by Corndogs are classic…And as I said in the past….I love Tim and always wish him the best. But, when MichaelB came around and incessantly bashed Tim about his home riddled next to Pedophiles, and then a REAL LIFE PEDOPHILE chimed in for a couple weeks it was Priceless. That 1 month was the BEST OF THE BUBBLE!

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