Real Actual Listing Photos: Quality Workmanship Edition

It’s time once again for another installment of Real Actual Listing Photos. Once a month (or so) I round up some of the most bizarre listing photos from around the Seattle area and post them here, with brief excerpts from the real actual listing description, and probably a bit of snarky commentary.

For a heaping helping of crazy listings from all over the world updated five times a week, tune into Looney Listing. If you’ve got a nomination for a listing photo that should appear here, drop me a line.

No particular theme this month. Just enjoy a collection of odd listing photos found by yours truly.

Enough explanation. Let’s get to the photos! Click the photo to view the Real Actual Listing.

2221 38th Pl E, Seattle, WA 98112“Madison Park home boasts soaring spaces, volumes of light, clean lines, & custom finishes: contemporary & timeless.”

I also love how there is an “open house” on Sunday from 1PM to 4PM but the address is “undisclosed.” Feel free to wander around Madison Park searching for this home!

2108 E Grand Ave, Everett, WA 98201“Quality workmanship in this completely remodeled home…”

The photo itself is perfectly decent, but the cropped portion I’ve shown at left shows an interesting definition of “quality workmanship,” in my opinion.

7807 46th S, Seattle, WA 98118“There are no remarks available.”

There are no remarks available.

10725 16th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98146“Attn: Hurry, hurry. .! Don’t miss out this opportunity. .. !!”

Note: This listing is not selling a Taco Bell. Also, definitely hurry because I’m sure after 116 days on the market it’s bound to go any day now.

3202 Warren Ave, Everett, WA 98201“Diamond in the rough!! Large Rucker Park Craftsman home in need of tender loving care.”

It’s worth pointing out that the neighborhood is called “Rucker Hill,” not “Rucker Park.”

426 Cypress Ave, Snohomish, WA 98290“Historic home in Snohomish in walking distance of doentown.”

Ahh, quaint doentown Snohomish.

Let me know if you have an idea for a future “Real Actual Listing Photos” theme, and be sure to check out Looney Listing for listing photo amusement throughout the month.


About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

27 comments:

  1. 1
    Peter Witting says:

    This shouldn’t surprise me, but I’m still sometimes taken aback by the extent of ratty and poorly maintained housing stock.

    And…what’s with that giant barco-lounger in the Taco Bell house??

  2. 2

    By Peter Witting @ 1:

    This shouldn’t surprise me, but I’m still sometimes taken aback by the extent of ratty and poorly maintained housing stock.

    One of the problems I have with politicians and NAR trying to promote a higher percentage of home ownership is that some people simply are not equipped, for one reason or another, to maintain a building. It would be like trying to promote the concept of having everyone change their own oil in their cars–not a very good idea.

  3. 3
  4. 4
    joe smith says:

    You used the same photo for the Madison Park and Snohomish listings

  5. 5
    Marc says:

    The Taco Bell one is also “Solid home right in the heard of White Center”. Have you heard of White Center? I’m sorry.

  6. 6
    The Tim says:

    RE: joe smith @ 4 – Sheesh, don’t know how I missed that. Sorry. Fixed! Thanks.

  7. 7
    redmondjp says:

    In the case of the double-wide drive-by pic, from the looks of things it was probably a wise decision to not linger about the premises! Odds are there’s a pit bull somewhere near as well.

  8. 8
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 2 – It goes deeper than that. I can’t quite figure it out, but there are people who can’t even be bothered to put things away. Lawnmowers, toys, tools all sitting out in the rain. I never understood this.

  9. 9

    RE: wreckingbull @ 8

    HOAs May Be Hades

    But at least the trashy neighbors are sifted out.

  10. 10

    RE: softwarengineer @ 9

    Update on My Hades HOA

    Their pre-approved $400K loan dream with illegal $3K liens on all the units to fix things is being eaten up by an attorney and and a professional consultant [about $20-30K wasted so far]…I imagine they’re trying to convince the banks to accept the liens [glass] in the porridge with legalese and long winded thick reports…now the implementation day [LOL] is this Christmas. What a horrifying joke and waste of money…the home owner boards are run by morons…

  11. 11

    By wreckingbull @ 8:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 2 – It goes deeper than that. I can’t quite figure it out, but there are people who can’t even be bothered to put things away. Lawnmowers, toys, tools all sitting out in the rain. I never understood this.

    Yes, there’s that too. There are fairly new houses I’ve seen where it not only appeared that the occupants ate food all over the house, but they did so without the benefit of plates and silverware. Just spots all over on fairly new carpet. And in the landlord situation I’ve seen situations where the landlord needs to go in every six months and give a notice to the tenant to clean up because it’s causing bug and smell issues for neighboring apartments.

  12. 12
    Erik says:

    The painted door was pretty funny. I don’t flip, but I fix, live in, then sell. Being detail oriented and fixing the tiniest details is worth the return I think. This photo was a huge miss. Leave as close to zero imperfections as possible. A $10 drywall repair is equal to $2000 deduction in sale price. Get it fixed!

  13. 13
    redmondjp says:

    RE: Erik @ 12 – Personally I don’t find the painted door to be that much of an issue, if one’s objective is to minimize the notice of there being a door at all. It probably looks even better from a distance.

    Now taking a PHOTO of the door for one’s for-sale ad, well, that’s a different story . . .

  14. 14
    Erik says:

    RE: redmondjp @ 13
    I like contemporary with clean lines. I suppose it is a style preference. Whatver commands top dollar I guess. I am gonna keep rocking my style… Well, my designers style. I am no designer, but I am pretty sure crossing lines like that won’t command top dollar. Most rich dummies that wanna overpay like clean lines.

  15. 15
    Erik says:

    RE: redmondjp @ 13
    I like contemporary with clean lines. I suppose it is a style preference. Whatver commands top dollar I guess. I am gonna keep rocking my style… Well, my designers style. I am no designer, but I am pretty sure crossing lines like that won’t command top dollar. Most rich dummies that wanna overpay like clean lines. I buy a model brush and obsess about each paint line until it is about perfect. This is after frog tape. There is something about those clean lines that turns me on.

  16. 16
    Mike says:

    Old people are another blight on neighborhoods. Amazing how many of these homes with a senior exemption on their property tax are left to ruin. You’d think they could spend a few dollars to hire a gardener with a $4K/yr tax cut.

    Single females living in older houses are another problem. Just next door the lady spent in the neighborhood of $80K on a top end kitchen remodel but hasn’t done jack to fix the water runoff issues. The house is separating from the sunken foundation with gaps over an inch wide in some spots.

  17. 17

    By Mike @ 16:

    Old people are another blight on neighborhoods. Amazing how many of these homes with a senior exemption on their property tax are left to ruin. You’d think they could spend a few dollars to hire a gardener with a $4K/yr tax cut. .

    What I see is them simply not being able to keep up after their abilities decline. Lots of estate sale houses that have been owned for decades show decline that is relatively recent (e.g. the last five years). I don’t think it is necessarily financial. In some cases it might even be something as simple as poor eyesight or not getting out of the house as much.

  18. 18

    Hey regarding the female homeowner not taking care of her house…. there are many single female homeowners out there for many reasons….divorce, death of their spouse, single by choice, etc., that can take care of a house just fine and if repairs are needed, can pick up the phone and pay someone to fix what needs fixing. Female homeownership is on the rise nationwide, and we are interested in more than just the kitchen.

    With either gender, aging takes it’s toll on the body and older homeowners may or may not be able to hop up on the roof to clean out the gutters, climb inside the crawl space to replace the furnace filter, or notice other repair issues. I don’t see retired neighbors as a blight but instead as just neighbors.

  19. 19
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 18 – Thank you. I live in an area where older residents often choose to live. Those with less means seem to be better neighbors than the wealthy retirees who move up here and try to throw their weight around.

    If you see a neighbor struggling, offer to help. I just mowed 5 acres for an old widower, whose wife died last month. Sure, he appreciated it, but the feeling I had after doing it was an even greater gift to myself. Sorry to sound sappy, but we will all be old someday.

  20. 20
    Erik says:

    RE: wreckingbull @ 19
    That was nice of you. I always offer to help, but it is so I can learn more about fixing houses. I’m sure you are very nice outside this website.

    Jillayne

    I am sure there are women savvy with construction, but if they are out there, they are few and far between. I have met a couple that are good, but they were about my level, which isn’t saying much. Never met a woman that is really good at remodeling. If you know one, let me know and I will hire her. I have hired woman for painting, which turned out great. She bartered paint work for electrical, plumbing, etc.

  21. 21
    redmondjp says:

    By wreckingbull @ 19:

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 18 – Thank you. I live in an area where older residents often choose to live. Those with less means seem to be better neighbors than the wealthy retirees who move up here and try to throw their weight around.

    If you see a neighbor struggling, offer to help. I just mowed 5 acres for an old widower, whose wife died last month. Sure, he appreciated it, but the feeling I had after doing it was an even greater gift to myself. Sorry to sound sappy, but we will all be old someday.

    Exactly.

    I learned to do this while growing up since I lived in an older neighborhood with many retired and elderly people, and I’ve been doing it ever since. I worry about the younger generations as they seem so entirely self-absorbed. Whatever your age, get to know your neighbors, and help them out whenever you can. Just doing something simple for them such as mowing the lawn or raking the leaves can help greatly.

    Our able-bodied “serial complainer” neighbor will fire off multiple emails to city code enforcement per day about a rake leaning against somebody’s garage (as an example), but will not lift a finger to do anything for the neighborhood or even offer to help anyone. This kind of attitude I have no use for.

  22. 22
    Neil says:

    I’m curious how in the Snohomish shot, they got that much motion blur on the tree outside the window, but none on the interior… it’s not wind, trees don’t blow like that… and a glass vibration might create a little but not that much. Odd.

    The one Taco Bell shot I thought was generous and honest at first, though not flattering… they’re letting you know what you’d be getting into, and it goes with the two shots before as a pan of the front. But later on, there’s two completely gratuitous shots of the Taco Bell from the parking area… and then I see the broker is actually touting the Taco Bell view as a plus!

    With the drive-by shot, you can see a small sign that reads “No Trespassing, Keep Out”, so it seems forgivable. Must be being sold out from under renters if he can’t even get permission for photos.

  23. 23

    RE: Neil @ 22

    I’ve known some agents who do drive by Broker Price Opinions for banks, and it can be a very dangerous job with someone who is losing their home to foreclosure coming out with a shotgun. But what struck me about the drive by photo is why not at least crop out your side view mirror? That same photo cropped well wouldn’t look half bad really.

  24. 24
    Mike says:

    At some point the elderlies that are having difficulty maintaining their homes have to go for the same reason the folks getting foreclosed have to go. They either can’t or don’t want to maintain their homes to the standards expected of the new residents. Aesthetically there is little difference between the homes that fall into disrepair by younger people that couldn’t afford it in the first place vs and elderly that choose not to. In many cases the old fogies are worse. They may go decades between age 70 and 90+ deferring maintenance. Younger people tend to get foreclosed on in a few years, so the total amount of damage they can do to the house is limited by their short tenure. By the time grandma decides to move out she might have let a water leak go for 25 years. They’re a blight on neighborhoods!

    I say this from experience. The absolute worst houses on any of the blocks around me are the ones someone died in. Often they are stuck in probate and the feuding heirs can’t figure out how to settle the estate. The roof falls and raccoons move in, then some developer ends up buying the place for $300K as a tear down. The surrounding neighbors are stuck with a 40 foot tall new build towering over them.

    Laugh all you want but these are REAL PROBLEMS caused by the old folks. They skate by in their well manicured grave site while the living suffer.

    /k… joking. I help my older neighbors with their yard work, hauling, etc. But there are some obvious comparisons with homes that go into foreclosure with respect to the overall character of the neighborhood.

  25. 25

    Great article Tim! That second picture cracks me up. Oh yeah, quality workmanship! So quality, not even common sense could stop them from making that paint job straight as a razor.

    And about the taco bell one: some would say it’s a GREAT location. If you’re into that sort of thing. lol

    I think I am hooked on your blog, Tim. Here’s to reading more awesome posts!

  26. 26

    RE: Mike @ 24

    The new build likely helps your property values more than an old house maintained well.

  27. 27
    Weasel says:

    Currently buying our first house, wife and I had many wtf+amusing moments from some of the photos we’ve seen in the sub 200k range. That’s just the tip of the iceberg it seems, the building inspector we used posts photos some of the bad ones he inspects on his FB page – https://www.facebook.com/SouthSoundInspections?sk=wall All I can say is if you’re thinking about skipping the inspection, dont!

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