High Seattle Home Prices Now The Subject Of Tasteless Bus Ads

This bus ad was spotted by Redditor /u/moroccahamed on /r/SeattleWA:

[caption id="attachment_104531" align="alignnone" width="720"]Tasteless Codefellows Bus Ad You know who can afford a house in Seattle? SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS.[/caption]

I feel like an ad like this is more likely to add to the already high level of animosity toward software developers than it is to get people to sign up for a coding academy…


State of the Seattle Housing Market: 2016

It’s been almost a year since we last took a high-level view of the local housing market and considered whether or not we’re experiencing Housing Bubble 2.0. Let’s step back and take another look at the big picture. Current Market Highlights standing inventory is at an all-time low new listings are at an all-time low […]

Everyone Should See “The Big Short,” But Probably Few Will

A few weeks ago I had the privilege of attending an early screening of the upcoming movie “The Big Short.”

I’m not a movie critic, and I don’t typically write reviews, but given how closely related the film’s contents are to the topics we have covered on this blog over the last ten years, I do want to share my thoughts and reactions to the movie.

Statewide Form 22A—Financing Contingency: The Broker’s Perspective

The statewide financing contingency form, Form 22A, present parties with some serious issues to consider. Prior pieces addressed seller and buyer concerns, but Form 22A also presents brokers with serious issues to consider.

The most complex issues for listing brokers may involve the seller’s decision to send a request to the buyer to waive their financing contingency using Form 22AR. Some attorneys believe that a seller’s request for waiver should frequently be sent simply because the waiver of the financing contingency would benefit the seller. In contrast, I would note that in practice I have seldom seen Form 22AR sent, either by my listing clients or sellers when I represent buyers. That calls into question why there is a difference between what some lawyers in Washington think should be done, and what actually occurs…