Posted by: Timothy Ellis (The Tim)

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

70 responses to “Market Heated Up in October as Inventory Collapsed”

  1. softwarengineer

    I’m Sure the Tax Increase Fiscal Cliff We’re About to Fall Off Of

    Will be solved in the nick of time….just add more MASS American overpopulation and about a Trillion in Subsequent Low Income Earned Income Tax Credits burden….that should put these new poor back in the real estate saddle again.

    Bernanke, start the printing presses…..$8/gal gas, $10/gal milk and $5/doz eggs are no problem….we’ll buy ‘em with our avg 28 hr week at $10.90/hr [per recent NYTs article] overpopulation jobs.

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  2. Tentative

    This reflects what we’re seeing as buyers. Everything the past 4 weeks that has come on the market has gone anywhere from 20-30k over asking and typically with multiple offers and numerous pre-inspections.

    As a conservative buyer it’s frustrating because we’re trying to manage the risk, but everyone else appears to be acting on gut and emotion. If this inflates too quickly even small upticks in rates or a pause in tech hiring could cause an immediate backlash.

    I said this too a year ago when leaving the bay area, so look how much I know…..

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  3. Howard

    By Tentative @ 2:

    This reflects what we’re seeing as buyers. Everything the past 4 weeks that has come on the market has gone anywhere from 20-30k over asking and typically with multiple offers and numerous pre-inspections.

    As a conservative buyer it’s frustrating because we’re trying to manage the risk, but everyone else appears to be acting on gut and emotion. If this inflates too quickly even small upticks in rates or a pause in tech hiring could cause an immediate backlash.

    I said this too a year ago when leaving the bay area, so look how much I know…..

    I am really starting to questoin are incentive to buy. I revisted the NY Times rent vs buy calculator.

    Using the following figures:
    450,000 purchase price
    1550 for current rent
    Rent increasing at 4%, home appreciating at 3%
    Cost of selling 8.5%
    Repairs .5%
    Renovaton 2%

    We rent in 98052. It is not a straight across comparison as I would never buy the house we rent. While it is a roof over our head, it is severly dated. I increased the renovations to 2%, because anything we look at in 98052 will need more updates than usual.

    Basically, renting is cheaper for the next 24 years.

    Why oh why do I have this urge to buy a house????

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  4. Raymond

    Maybe I’m not looking at this correctly, but at the end of 30 years, you actually own something that hopefully is worth something. I wouldn’t want to retire still paying rent, maybe someone can shine a little light on this for me. After 30 years the person renting would still presumably be rquired to continue paying rent where the house purchaser would not be paying rent or mortgage (excluding taxes, insurance, maintainence), am I wrong?

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  5. David S

    RE: Tentative @ 2 – Because all the buyers bring their sacks of extra cash to closing?

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  6. JWS

    RE: Howard @ 3

    The NY Times Rent vs. Buy calculator is a favorite of mine – I think it’s very helpful. However, I find that I need to adjust several of the assumptions (advanced settings for most of these). Closing costs from buying, renovation cost, maintenance cost, insurance and property taxes all need to be adjusted down based on my experience.

    Additionally, I think it’s important to assume you are renting or buying the same quality of house in a comparable neighborhood for it to be an accurate analysis.

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  7. Erin

    RE: Tentative @ 2

    I don’t know how much is “gut and emotion” vs. need. After 5 months of looking, I am finally in contract to buy a home. I am a new Seattle transplant, and have been living out of one suitcase since May.

    Originally I was planning to rent. Guess what? With my pets almost no landlord would take me. I was contemplating a smaller inferior apartment in Seattle at DOUBLE the rent I was previously paying in a super prime area of Chicago.

    I will pay more than I wanted for my new Seattle home. However, I will be getting a terrific property in a great neighborhood…and paying WAY less (especially after taxes) than I would otherwise pay for an ugly unrenovated rental.

    In short, the homebuying process for me was certainly emotional but the decision to buy was anything but. Same goes for my co-workers…lots of relocating folks coming here with partners and children…they need a home NOW and quality rentals are tough to come by. I often replied to postings within 10 minutes and was already 5th in line!

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  8. HappyRenter

    RE: Erin @ 6
    My experience is that good rentals are easier to find during the summer. Just be persistent. Our rental apartment is larger than a lot of Seattle homes and affordable, too. I understand though that if you have pets other than cats it can be difficult.

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  9. Jonness

    By softwarengineer @ 1:

    Bernanke, start the printing presses…..$8/gal gas, $10/gal milk and $5/doz eggs are no problem….we’ll buy ‘em with our avg 28 hr week at $10.90/hr [per recent NYTs article] overpopulation jobs.

    Democracy ensures that the majority rules. This works out great for the majority of people, which is why they continue to vote for massive entitlements paid for by deficit spending.

    Unfortunately, in a democracy, hyper-intelligent people have no voice because there aren’t enough of them around compared to the vote of the masses. Put another way, more than half of all people have an IQ of 100 or below. So take a deep breath and try to get used to having your life governed by those with a double-digit IQ score. It’s not like you have a choice in the matter.

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  10. Kary L. Krismer

    RE: Jonness @ 8 – It’s worse than that. With at least $500 Billion extra being spent each year that should not be spent, some people are actually benefiting from that spending. It’s in their interest, at least in the short term. So to vote for a certain result they do not all need to be stupid. They’re effectively being paid to vote for certain results that don’t make sense over the long term.

    So we’re being governed by stupid people and those being paid off.

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  11. JG

    RE: Jonness @ 8

    Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.
    – George Carlin

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  12. johnnybigspenda

    these graphs characterize the current state of the Seattle market perfectly.

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  13. Jonness

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 9:

    So we’re being governed by stupid people and those being paid off.

    :)

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  14. Erin

    RE: HappyRenter @ 7

    If we didn’t have a dog on the Seattle restricted breed list I think our experience would have been very different. Given there is a pet supply store every few blocks in Seattle, I was surprised to see how hostile the rental market is to dog owners.

    We offered a $4,000 damage deposit to one landlord. He still turned away our extremely well-behaved Chow/Golden Retriever mix, who has respected our hardwood floors, antique furniture and persian rugs for years. For the record, we are two professionals with graduate degrees, very comfortable incomes, and perfect credit. Nobody would rent a decent apartment or home to us – and we were looking in June and July, before giving up and reluctantly looking to buy.

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  15. ray pepper

    RE: Erin @ 14 – “reluctantly” looking to buy….Because of a dog or pets..??? Good God…bought a home because you could not find a landlord to accept your pet?

    I love my dog of 13 years but I would NEVER …EVER…buy real estate for this reason..Horrible investment…

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  16. SG

    RE: ray pepper @ 15 – So what would you do? Give up your dog? I pity your dog. Way to go @Erin.

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  17. ray pepper

    RE: SG @ 16 – “Way to go Erin”…..Yes, great….brilliant..Rah Rah …..Your as big an idiot as he is…I would never give up my dog. But, I would NEVER buy a home for a dog.. nor would I buy a home as a “new Seattle transplant” anyway….

    “we are two professionals with graduate degrees, very comfortable incomes, and perfect credit”….Most of the biggest boneheads fit this criteria..

    The joy is we need people like both of you to stimulate our PNW home sales so Bravo!! Hurray!

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  18. Ira Sacharoff

    RE: Jonness @ 9
    One of the problems is that many of the dumbshidds absolutely insist that theyre the hyperintelligent ones,

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  19. ARDELL

    RE: Erin @ 14

    Erin, I think you should tell us where you want to live…as broad an area as possible, so we can help you find a place to live that will accept you with your dog. I will not agree with Ray’s name calling…but I will agree that we need to find you a rental vs your buying a home for this reason.

    Maybe just outside of Seattle? Shoreline? Eastside? If “Seattle restricted breed list” is the problem, maybe outside of Seattle is the answer? A slightly longer commute vs buying just because you don’t want to lose your dog may be the better answer?

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  20. Ira Sacharoff

    By ray pepper @ 17:

    RE: SG @ 16 – “Way to go Erin”…..Yes, great….brilliant..Rah Rah …..Your as big an idiot as he is…I would never give up my dog. But, I would NEVER buy a home for a dog.. nor would I buy a home as a “new Seattle transplant” anyway….

    “we are two professionals with graduate degrees, very comfortable incomes, and perfect credit”….Most of the biggest boneheads fit this criteria..

    The joy is we need people like both of you to stimulate our PNW home sales so Bravo!! Hurray!

    If the choice was giving up my dog, or buying a house knowing that I very well might lose 100,000 in equity over the next few years, I’d buy the house. But then I’ve always gotten along with dogs better than with people.

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  21. ray pepper

    RE: ARDELL @ 19 – Its OK to name call because I do NOT know him personally but his actions are BEYOND STUPID. So therefore he is an idiot. If I meet him personally I may change my mind but I doubt it. I find many people idiots.

    Erin my gift to you that I have given MANY MANY people on here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iqFO-Udq6s

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  22. Tentative

    RE: Erin @ 14

    Agreed, the rental market is equally tight right now and only more so for those with pets. I’ve known many folks to get pushed out of cities for the very reason. We obviously got lucky moving to Seattle, as we found a house in a great neighborhood that accepted pets and only required a 6 month lease.

    Given the neighborhood, space and the rent I pay, there’s no way I could mortgage this place for what I’m paying currently. This all comes at a 25% less than we payed in Oakland…yes, Oakland. So the inverse reality you experienced it out there too.

    So I do see your “NOW” urgency, it’s just not that way for us and makes the current reality a little hard to accept.

    I did hear that Seattle has a pending glut of rentals coming on the market over the next 18months…but that doesn’t help you now :)

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  23. No Name Guy

    RE: Raymond @ 4

    Well, the way to calculate it is thus:

    For each dollar of monthly expenses (for rent & renters insurance for the apartment dweller, or in the alternate, taxes, homeowners insurance and upkeep for the paid off home OWNER) you’ll need 300 to 400 dollars of income producing investments, depending on what rate you think you can earn.

    For 3% interest or dividend yield, you’ll need 400 dollars of investments per dollar of monthly income. (0.03 x 400 dollars = 12 dollars / year = 1 dollar / month).

    For 4% interest or dividend yeild, you’ll need 300 dollars of investments per dollar of monthly income. (0.04 x 300 dollars = 12 dollars / year = 1 dollar / month).

    The super conservative might only get 2%. They’ll need 600 dollars of investments per dollar of monthly expense.

    Going with the 3% yield: That means that my approximate 250 / month in property taxes and homeowners insurance on my modest paid off house requires that I have $100,000 in investments to pay those expenses. Throw in another 200 / month for upkeep and there’s another 80,000 I’ll need to pay for that. So, with a 180k, plus the house paid off, I have a place to live, forever. Lets say the house is currently 175k, so I’ll have assets of 355k.

    Lets see what the renter can do with the same 355k (the 175k value of the house plus the 180k) at 3% yield: Well, that’s 10,650 / year or about 888 a month. So, what can you get for 888 / month? A heck of a lot less that what I have.

    Even if you were working as a greeter at Wally World, earning 450 / month after tax is a wee bit easier than 890.

    Yeah, I’ll take the fully paid for home over renting in retirement any day of the week.

    My 2 cents, YMMV, different strokes for different folks….yadda, yadda, yadda.

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  24. Howard

    By Raymond @ 4:

    Maybe I’m not looking at this correctly, but at the end of 30 years, you actually own something that hopefully is worth something. I wouldn’t want to retire still paying rent, maybe someone can shine a little light on this for me. After 30 years the person renting would still presumably be rquired to continue paying rent where the house purchaser would not be paying rent or mortgage (excluding taxes, insurance, maintainence), am I wrong?

    I have no idea what I want to do in 30 years. Right now I dream of moving to somewhere warm and cheap to retire. That will evolve and change. What will most likely happen is I chase my kids and want live close to my grandchildren (My twins are three).

    The only good reason for me to purchase a house “now” is that I “want” to live in particular area and have a “home” for my kids. I have a very different view of a “house” vs a “home”.

    We still will probably buy, but it isn’t going to be for financial reasons.

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  25. Kary L. Krismer

    By Howard @ 24:

    I have no idea what I want to do in 30 years. Right now I dream of moving to somewhere warm and cheap to retire.

    That would be a situation where you would want to buy a house in an expensive area and pay it off. You could then sell and move to the cheaper area and have both a house and a pile of money.

    Before the peak I was saying the run up in prices didn’t matter unless that was your plan, or you intended to someday downsize. As long as you still planned on living in the Seattle area in a house you owned, the run up in prices didn’t really make you richer. You still just had a Seattle area house and your other assets (less debts).

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  26. HappyRenter

    RE: Erin @ 14
    I understand. It’s a bummer. Most landlords are ok with cats, some with dogs but not many. I wonder how it is with music instruments like pianos or violins. Are landlords ok with that? Do they require to not be playing at certain times?

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  27. HappyRenter

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 20:

    If the choice was giving up my dog, or buying a house knowing that I very well might lose 100,000 in equity over the next few years, I’d buy the house. But then I’ve always gotten along with dogs better than with people.

    Hey, aren’t dogs supposed to be smarter than people after all? If they could only vote! ;)

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  28. Raymond

    I guess if money doesnt play a part in ones decision making of whether or not to buy, it leaves a lot more doors open; personally I think a combination of financial reasons and other factors is best- but what do I know.

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  29. Howard

    By Raymond @ 28:

    I guess if money doesnt play a part in ones decision making of whether or not to buy, it leaves a lot more doors open; personally I think a combination of financial reasons and other factors is best- but what do I know.

    I didn’t intend to imply that it isn’t a combination of factors, but for us, financial is not one of them.

    Kids, schools, commute, sports programs, kids friends, day care, desire to live in same school district that my wife works… All quality of life issues for us.

    If it was about money, we would be buying a house for under 300k, that is the break even point for us.

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  30. Erin

    Wow – such a reaction!

    My prior comment was clearly misleading…we did not choose to buy because of our dog, although that was a factor that made our rental search difficult.

    We chose to buy because we were looking at paying $2500-$3500 a month for a Seattle rental that would not be a *significant* step down from our $250K condo in Chicago. Personally I cannot stomach that kind of rent payment. Our mortgage plus taxes will be under $2500/month now, and in a location that does not require the expense of a second car to boot.

    To those who think I am stupid: Well, I was smart enough to sell all my real estate holdings by May 2007…made out like a bandit…so I am inclined to trust my instincts. But obviously you win some and you lose some. Moreover, not every transaction in life is going to be a bargain and sometimes you just have to look past that because there are bigger issues at stake than getting a deal. It was also about building a home in Seattle where we would be comfortable.

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  31. macDog

    Woooa let’s not get too emotional over jealousy of a dog. I wish I’m as cute and somebody will throw me a bone and $100k but life goes on.
    The fact that Erin has money down, good credit score, a high paying job, a loving healthy dog, is far better than most people in this economy, so he or she is definitely no idiot and doing something right, so congrads!

    I just bought a house in the city, monthly expenses less than what I paid in rent. Looked over 6 months for the right house to love at the right price. Ironic that I shunned real estate last decade and thought everyone else were idiots. Now I just don’t care.
    My landlord did not allow canines; I’m looking for a puppy now, maybe a schnoodle.

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  32. Eastsider

    I don’t see why so many people take issue with Erin’s decision to buy a house for the following reasons:

    1. She is not buying it as an investment;
    2. She is not leveraged and can easily afford the payments;
    3. She is buying a HOME. A homeowner has a lot of freedom, including having a dog, add a hot tub, etc. Further, she can stay in the SAME house as long as she wants.
    4. She is buying at market price. Sure some of you think current pricing is expensive but that’s doesn’t mean anything. (You can always sell your house if you think prices will come down again.)

    Erin is NOT stupid. She is making an informed decision. I think Seattle Bubble simply attracts too many people with negative views on housing.

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  33. Ray pepper

    RE: Erin @ 30 – Made out like a bandit because you sold in 2007 and rebought in 2012? The real people who made out like a “bandit” were those who never sold and instead stopped paying and received 50 percent or more lopped off their principle balances here in 2012 forward. They received 5 years plus of free rent or if you may rental income , and now get the deal of a lifetime. So I would not be patting myself on the back too hard. Those that bought in 2007, and have educated themselves , continue to have their payday every month while waiting for their BIG pay off.

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  34. Erin

    RE: Ray pepper @ 33

    I think I can fairly say that I “made out like a bandit” between 2002 and 2007 because I sold my purchases at a very healthy return after expenses.

    As for the decision to buy in 2012, only time will tell whether than was a good decision on a financial level. It is certainly a good decision on a quality of life level. I can walk to so many of Seattle’s best amenities, and walk to work daily…

    And yes, keep my (senior, former abuse rescue) dog;)

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  35. Ray pepper

    RE: Erin @ 34 – good luck to you Erin. Anyone who loves their dog as much as you deserves a handshake. I also had a rescue dog that worked with me for many years in/out of health care facilities and while I was in nursing school . She was a licensed therapy dog and was my best friend for a very long time.

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  36. David Losh

    RE: ray pepper @ 21

    Is it the centipede?

    Beware the Ray Pepper You Tubes.

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  37. David Losh

    There are two houses over a million that I have watched sit, go up for sale, go up for rent, go back up for sale for five years.

    They both went pending in the last two weeks.

    Sold within weeks for about the same price they started at.

    I think it’s an insane time in our market place, but, I agree with Erin, a lot of people have relocated here, and don’t want to play the rental market crap shoot.

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  38. ChrisM

    RE: Howard @ 3 – I just extended our lease by 3 years, locking in the current payment. I’m really lucky, as we get along great w/ our landlord – a very hands off relationship w/ mutual trust. It is a property in the country, so I get to try out various schemes.

    I used to live in Europe, where renting is common. If I could, I’d love to lease a place in the country for 20-30 years, w/ an exit clause. My fears include massive increases in property taxes plus onerous taxes of various sorts to pay for govt pensions, as well as a general economic collapse. I’m paying for mobility options.

    At the same time, I’m looking for 4-plex rental properties. I love properties that generate income, I’m just not so happy about spending for a house…

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  39. Kary L. Krismer

    By Ray pepper @ 33:

    RE: Erin @ 30 – Made out like a bandit because you sold in 2007 and rebought in 2012? The real people who made out like a “bandit” were those who never sold and instead stopped paying and received 50 percent or more lopped off their principle balances here in 2012 forward. They received 5 years plus of free rent or if you may rental income , and now get the deal of a lifetime. .

    Not everyone has few enough assets, low enough income, and lives in a crappy enough house for that to occur.

    But other than that, great advice. /sarc

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  40. corndogs

    RE: David Losh @ 37 – “There are two houses over a million that I have watched sit, go up for sale, go up for rent, go back up for sale for five years.

    They both went pending in the last two weeks.

    Sold within weeks for about the same price they started at.

    I think it’s an insane time in our market place”

    Outside of King county, looking at Pierce, Snohomish and Thurston county combined, 41% of all million plus homes sold in the last 3 months were across the Narrows bridge in the tiny geographical region of Gig Harbor… a lot of insane Republicans out here Losh, I wouldn’t recommend that you come out here, ever. It might be contagious…

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  41. David Losh

    RE: corndogs @ 40

    I went to an estate sale today in a house that has sat vacant since 2006. The heirs are people with money, Democracts of course, but this must be the time to sell.

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  42. corndogs

    RE: David Losh @ 41 – “people with money, Democracts of course”

    HAHA yeah well I guess it’s all relative isn’t it. I’m sure when you picked out your old lady and saw her gold tooth you yelled out “Jackpot”…

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  43. David Losh

    RE: corndogs @ 42

    Why would you alienate every reader of your comments? What’s the upside?

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  44. Jacknut16

    RE: ray pepper @ 15

    If your lifestyle is one of wanting to have pets and dogs, buying is a great reason to do so.

    Not everything has to be an outright amazing investment to own a home.

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  45. Pegasus

    RE: corndogs @ 42 – Hee Haw Hee Haw Hee Haw !! What a jackass!

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  46. whatsmyname

    RE: Howard @ 3
    For your analysis to be valid as dollar cost savings, you would need to rent the place you are in (or its equivalent) for the next 24 years. By that point you have bought the lifestyle, and pretty much bought the house you said you wouldn’t buy. You just have no ownership in what you bought. That kind of thing is why you want to compare apples with apples.

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  47. corndogs

    RE: whatsmyname @ 46 – “you would need to rent the place you are in (or its equivalent) for the next 24 years.” Also rents and home valuations do not go up 3% or 4% a year like clockwork… Over the 24 year period, there will still likely be times to buy and sell at a profit. You should understand that based on what you just experienced over the last 10 years.

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  48. wreckingbull

    RE: David Losh @ 43 – This is what attention whores do. The type of attention garnered is irrelevant to them.

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  49. Kary L. Krismer

    By Jacknut16 @ 44:

    RE: ray pepper @ 15 – If your lifestyle is one of wanting to have pets and dogs, buying is a great reason to do so.

    Not everything has to be an outright amazing investment to own a home.

    I would agree. Pets can damage property, and having those repairs be on your own timeline can be important, as opposed to being forced to pay for repairs when a lease can not longer be renewed. Also with pets you might want to have total control over access to your home.

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  50. wreckingbull

    RE: Jacknut16 @ 44 – This leads me to another question for Ray. Ray, you always point out people you know who milk the system, via loopholes, perpetual delay tactics, and outright fraud. I fully believe you that some have been doing this for upwards of five years.

    What is the long-term strategy, though? When their time is up, what are their opportunities in the following seven years. Eventually, “they will all come back” as you have constantly told us, so I am curious to hear the rest of the story.

    Thanks.

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  51. whatsmyname

    RE: corndogs @ 47
    Very true; the static analysis does not hold true for the short term – and perhaps not even for the long term. What was interesting to me here was that even if you do accept the static analysis, the mismatch in housing assumptions forces one into choosing the suboptimal housing choice for the long term – but without the upside of that very choice. The result is to make an unconscious third choice which is worse than either of the other two.

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  52. ray pepper

    RE: wreckingbull @ 50 – Jacknut, Howard, Wreckingbull I work mostly with investors. It is their opinion that the institution that held the note has no legal basis to claim ownership. So through Attorney’s and thousands of other tactics (many illustrated on hamster wheel) they hinder thr process for ANYONE (including them) to claim ownership.

    See they do NOT care who owns the home only that it produces income or at the very least provides a free place to live.

    The long-term strategy is their savings that they continue to accrue. Many of the rentals produce pure cash-flow because the taxes and insurance were escrowed many years ago. With the PURE savings they buy rentals homes for CASH or at the very least keep tucking it away. So many I know just continue to put away their monthly rents they receive and many more take the payment they would have paid their owner-occupied lender and put that aside as well. They are NOT alone. I expect countless thousands are doing the same thing across the nation.

    As of Nov 2012 so many tell me that this housing carsh was the BEST thing that could of ever happened to them on a personal level. Please keep in mind these people are VERY educated in this matter and have ZERO remorse. They feel the original lenders are bankrupt anyway and the money that is trying to be reclaimed has no right to the people trying to grasp it now. So as the months and years grind away so many continue to smile as their savings slowly increase month after month and year after year.

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  53. Howard

    By whatsmyname @ 52:

    RE: corndogs @ 47
    Very true; the static analysis does not hold true for the short term – and perhaps not even for the long term. What was interesting to me here was that even if you do accept the static analysis, the mismatch in housing assumptions forces one into choosing the suboptimal housing choice for the long term – but without the upside of that very choice. The result is to make an unconscious third choice which is worse than either of the other two.

    I disagree. The third choice is a conscious choice. We have decided that if we were to buy, we would only buy in certain neighborhoods with certain amenities and a house that we will be comfortable for a long time.

    If we decide to rent, we will seek out the cheapest place that keeps a roof over our family an our stuff. We can then take the $1200 a month saved and use it for other things (investing, travel, etc.)

    There is no in between for us. We have made the decision that will not purchase a 1960s split level or rambler. We won’t purchase a house along a busy road or underneath power lines. In the Lake Washington School District, specifically Kirkland or Redmond and not Sammamish, with a easy commute to Totem Lake and a short distance to a park and ride that means we would be buying in the $500k plus range.

    The decision for us is: rent for $1550 a month (today’s $) or buy for $500k plus, which puts our PITI at $2750 a month or more.

    That’s OUR decision. If we were to buy a $300k 1960s time machine, of course buying would be cheaper. I just am not willing to own one.

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  54. whatsmyname

    RE: Howard @ 54
    Certainly it is your choice. From your case, though, it appears that you are choosing to live in a 1960′s time machine, or something under a power line to save money. I don’t see where the money you save is materially different whether you are renting or buying the particular space you are choosing to inhabit.

    Perhaps you want to keep your options open to change your mind and/or your living space. That, of course, would have value. Anyway, so long as it’s what you consciously want, it’s all good.

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  55. Howard

    By whatsmyname @ 55:

    RE: Howard @ 54
    Certainly it is your choice. From your case, though, it appears that you are choosing to live in a 1960′s time machine, or something under a power line to save money. I don’t see where the money you save is materially different whether you are renting or buying the particular space you are choosing to inhabit.

    Perhaps you want to keep your options open to change your mind and/or your living space. That, of course, would have value. Anyway, so long as it’s what you consciously want, it’s all good.

    Exactly.. I would also add that I believe that the timearp split levels are the next fiscal cliff. Once someone realizes that they need to replumb, re wire, re do insulation, put new windows in and they still have a time warp, they prices will stagnate or decline.

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  56. corndogs

    RE: wreckingbull @ 48RE: Pegasus @ 45RE: David Losh @ 43 – “Why would you alienate every reader”

    The one thing the 3 of you have in common is you are the only 3 on here that have the victim mentality. When someone rips you a new one, you throw out some line as if your plight is shared with all of mankind… You even pathetically attempt to protect each other at times. Corndog has intellectually manhandled the three of you at will over many months and proven you wrong and foolish. While Corndog predicts the future and is always correct. Pegasux and Wreckingbung have grown rather timid in expressing any debatable opinion, all they have left is one line name calling. But this Losh, he takes the head shots and just comes back for more…. it’s amazing..

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  57. wreckingbull

    RE: corndogs @ 57 – The Illeism is entertaining. Mongo like candy?

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  58. Pegasus

    RE: wreckingbull @ 58 – Mongo only pawn in game of life…..

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  59. corndogs

    RE: wreckingbull @ 58 – “The Illeism is entertaining.” Another common ploy of the feeble-minded Democrat…lacking the ability to comprehend cause and effect relationships, they pull out a 9th grade vocabulary word to feign intelligence.. let me know when High School starts boys…

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  60. Doug

    RE: corndogs @ 57

    This from the guy who thought pre-teens voted in Obama. Nostradumbass.

    I always read corndog posts in the Ultimate Warrior’s voice. The random preening. The claims to intellectual dominance. The lack of punctuation, random thoughts trailing off into the void with ellipses. It’s all there.

    I better watch it, though, or he might call me black and uneducated, like he did with Ira.

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  61. corndogs

    RE: Doug @ 61 – HAHA – go get ‘em Doug!.. you find fault with me calling Ira black and uneducated directly after he called me white and educated? The only difference is that my statement was factually correct…. HAHA… typical liberal….. do you have any thoughts of your own?… Pre-teens is a term of endearment for the under 30 voting block…..”

    By the way, language major, the sentence you used starting with the the words “The lack of punctuation” should have a comma after the word “ellipses” instead of a period…

    “The lack of punctuation, random thoughts trailing off into the void with ellipses. It’s all there. ”

    Classic!

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  62. Doug

    Congratulations, Encyclopedia Brown. You’ve figured out that I write in a colloquial voice on message boards.

    It’s fun to watch you styling yourself as some kind of intellectual titan, dropping truth bombs and being the last free-thinking man on earth, when all you’ve ever provided are the very easiest of stereotypes.

    “HAHA… typical liberal….. do you have any thoughts of your own?”

    Truly, I do shudder under the oppressive brunt of your words.

    The only slightly original assertion I’ve ever seen you put forth is that the DJIA fell after the second presidential debate because Obama won the debate. While this may be original (or may not, I don’t follow WND or InfoWars), it was easily disprovable.

    Plus, Ira is awesome: brimming with self-confidence, humor and regard for his fellow man, even when in an argument. You might want to try at least one of these.

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  63. corndogs

    “Congratulations, Encyclopedia Brown. You’ve figured out that I write in a colloquial voice on message boards.” Jesus Christ, ok Tinkerbell!

    Bottom line is, you tried to correct Corndogs grammar with a sentence that had improper grammar…… that’s a lose for you today…. you need to come back another day to get another chance from the Corndog. Corndog has spoken…

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  64. ARDELL

    I think Corndogs is someone we already know who is using a different name, so as to be more abusive than the normal amount of abusive we know him/her to be by his/her regularly used name. Some of it is entertaining. Personal attacks on David and his family…well, I don’t know any other blog owner who would allow that to stand. Those personal flames should be deleted, IMO.

    Corndogs, can I at least ask that you refrain from hitting below the belt as to David Losh? It really is not funny, and he truly does not deserve it, and it makes me very sad to see it.

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  65. wreckingbull

    RE: ARDELL @ 65 – You mean J Hammy? The guy that tried to show off his asphalt-landscaped oak and gold 80′s palace in Gig Harbor? Could be the same guy, the posts are similar.

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  66. Pegasus

    RE: wreckingbull @ 66 – They are the same. I wonder how his crying about the county’s evaluation for him buying a discounted distressed property turned out. I know his neighbors think he is already stinking up the neighborhood. Funny how it isn’t hard to identify the losers in life. Buying a nice home at someone else’s distress does not make you automatically make you smart or a nice guy or someone people want to associate with. Living next to this one seems to be a problem for some……

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  67. Ira Sacharoff

    By corndogs @ 62:

    RE: Doug @ 61 – HAHA – go get ‘em Doug!.. you find fault with me calling Ira black and uneducated directly after he called me white and educated? The only difference is that my statement was factually correct…. HAHA… typical liberal….. do you have any thoughts of your own?… Pre-teens is a term of endearment for the under 30 voting block…..”

    By the way, language major, the sentence you used starting with the the words “The lack of punctuation” should have a comma after the word “ellipses” instead of a period…

    “The lack of punctuation, random thoughts trailing off into the void with ellipses. Itâ��s all there. ”

    Classic!

    Please cite me a post where I ever called you white and educated. I don’t believe I did, and if I did, I apologize:)

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  68. Ira Sacharoff

    RE: Doug @ 61
    Corndogs didn’t call me uneducated and black. That was semi black, whatever that is. I guess it’s like semicolon or semitruck.

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  69. Nearly Half of New Listings Pending in Two Weeks • Seattle Bubble

    [...] was concerned when this number shot up to over 36% back in October. 46% is just crazy. We’re just two months behind San [...]

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