Friday Flashback: “What more can you ask for?”

Here’s an excerpt from an a Q&A with the then-president of the Thurston County Realtors Association Bill Hutchinson that appeared in The Olympian in February 2008 (now available only behind their archive paywall):

Bill Hutchinson, president of the Thurston County Realtors AssociationQ: Given where the market is today compared with a couple of years ago, what would your advice be for sellers and buyers now that the market has slowed down a bit?

A: Right up front, this is a great time to buy. Interest rates are historically low; we have a great inventory of homes. As a buyer, what more can you ask for?

What more could you have asked for? Oh, I don’t know… How about way cheaper homes?

Say… people who waited four years after Bill Hutchinson’s “great time to buy” got not only homes that were around 25% cheaper but also interest rates that were two whole points lower!

Here’s how I responded to this drivel at the time.

The purpose of our Friday Flashback series is to remind people why it’s never a good idea to base your home purchase decisions on the word of someone with a vested financial interest in selling as many homes as possible for as much as possible, no matter what. If you’ve got a good example of local home salespeople or other industry shills on record making fools of themselves in the years before the bubble burst, shoot me an email.
  

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

59 comments:

  1. 1

    Perhaps not your best example. Assuming he was talking Thurston county, the decline in much less, assuming you’re talking apples and apples (non-distressed median and mean). I’m only showing about a 14% drop in the median and 16% in the mean. Also at the time, January 2008 was above January 2007, and not that far below July 2007 (assuming that was their peak). Really at the time they were flat which probably explains why he didn’t mention price.

    To some extent, Thurston county (and Kitsap) are more like Washington DC–affected by government employment.

    Also, while the lower interest rate is the same down there, refinancing is possible (at a cost).

    Also, your post 9 to that earlier thread makes me smile. Inventory didn’t sound like a big deal back then, did it? ;-)

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  2. 2
    Erik says:

    Do you think Bill Hutchinson is really that ignorant or do you think he is a liar and a cheat? I would lean further toward liar and cheat, but i give people too much credit sometimes.

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  3. 3

    Reading further through the old comments, apparently Ray took a good deal of crap here back then too.

    Oh and on post #1, numbers from NWMLS sources, but not guaranteed.

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  4. 4
    Ron says:

    So what are current home owners and prospective home owners supposed to do? Try to time the market? Buy low and sell high? Good luck with that….

    I certainly cannot predict where the market is going but as a resident and casual observer of Seattle trends include RE, it appears to me that Seattle is going to grow for the foreseeable future as population, pacific trade, tourism, and so many other economic drivers evolve. Sure, Seattle as a developing metropolitan city could crash and burn economically but I wouldn’t bet on that. I believe Seattle RE prices will be volatile (10% to 25% periodic swings) going forward.

    Of course, I’ve got no data to support that view of the world.

    Current and prospective homeowners need to be prepared for volatility and not over leverage themselves or buy McMansions when all they really need is maybe 1000 sq ft for a couple.

    When I look at 2010 US census data (Type of Household by Age of Householder), the average net worth of homeowners is over twice that of non-homeowners. Make of that what you will but I’ll always believe that home ownership helps build wealth and is worth the risk.
    http://www.census.gov/people/wealth/

    We’ve go Macklemore with his Thrift Shop tune which is, by the way, the #1 tune in the world right now! Look no further…Seattle is hip!

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  5. 5
    Erik says:

    RE: Ron @ 4
    Why do you think we are all here Ron? You don’t think you can predict the future of the market to some degree? You are ignorant. If there wasn’t a bunch of ignorant people out there like you, this market wouldn’t be so predictable.

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  6. 6
    Ron says:

    RE: Erik @ 5

    I said ‘I’ cannot predict the market and don’t need to try although my opinion has been shared. I’ll leave that up to others. As for being ignorant as you suggest, I’ve done just fine in RE over the past 15 years.

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  7. 7
    Erik says:

    RE: Ron @ 6
    You must listen to the indicators somewhat if you’ve been successful.

    I am someone that would have bought in 2007 if I was able to. Knowing what I know now about the market, there is no way I would buy in 2007.

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  8. 8

    RE: Ron @ 4
    “When I look at 2010 US census data (Type of Household by Age of Householder), the average net worth of homeowners is over twice that of non-homeowner.”
    When you read that, your assumption is that homeowning leads to wealth.
    When I read that, I assume that wealth leads to homeowning. I think most people who have too much money aren’t going to choose to stay renters over an extended period of time. But
    just how well have the folks who bought starter homes in 2007 been doing?
    Not so well. Those folks who bought in developments in places like Auburn and Bonney Lake and Puyallup? Not so good. In many of their cases, homeowning led to poverty, not wealth.

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  9. 9
    Erik says:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 8
    I agree. Timing the market and buying at the right time is a huge deal when it comes to personal wealth I think. There’s a huge advantage in getting a good deal, especially if you don’t have a lot of money in the first place.

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  10. 10
    Mike says:

    By Erik @ 2:

    Do you think Bill Hutchinson is really that ignorant or do you think he is a liar and a cheat? I would lean further toward liar and cheat, but i give people too much credit sometimes.

    That sharp gold blazer really helps add credibility though.

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  11. 11
    Ron says:

    RE: Erik @ 9
    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 8

    There were two times in modern history when buying a home was a tragic time to buy: circa WWI and just before the recent meltdown.
    http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2011/04/case-shiller-100-year-chart-2011-update/

    So yes, market timing is important but those are aberrations. Besides that, trying to time the market as it cycles doesn’t make sense to me if someone is looking for a home and thinking of it as a long term investment.

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  12. 12
    Marc says:

    RE: Erik @ 7 – Yes, you’re right, buying in 2007 was not the best move (says the guy who bought in Aug. 2007).

    Fortunately, we bought in a good neighborhood and we really like our little house. And it doesn’t hurt that property values have gone up enough that I can now sell and walk away with a little bit of change. If things keep going the way they are right now it won’t be long until I can sell for enough to recover all I’ve put into it (I won’t be holding my breath).

    Unfortunately, if we did sell there’s nothing in the neighborhood that we’d want enough to spend what it will cost. I think there may be a good number of people like my wife and I who will keep their current home because there’s not an attractive alternative. Getting into bidding wars for a house that’s not sufficiently better than what we’ve already got is a nonstarter.

    So instead we just bought a new water heater, got new gutters, we’re having it painted, and a new washer/dryer are one good holiday weekend sale away. God bless America.

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  13. 13
    Ray pepper says:

    I would like to state that buying in 2005-7 has made some of the greatest real estate returns in history to the astute investor owner. But, furthermore I would like to emphasize that LENDING in those same years had the worst returns in decades. Get it right Bubble Heads!

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  14. 14

    By Marc @ 12:

    RE: Erik @ 7 – Yes, you’re right, buying in 2007 was not the best move (says the guy who bought in Aug. 2007).

    We bought around the same time (October), but last time I checked our old property declined in value much more than the new property, and the new property is much more enjoyable. Also, as I’ve mentioned, renting is simply not an option for us for many reasons.

    The timing of our decision to buy was based on other factors, the most important one was having a very messy neighbor finally move at the old house. We were probably out looking the day we confirmed that sale (it wasn’t a listing).

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  15. 15

    By Ray pepper @ 13:

    I would like to state that buying in 2005-7 has made some of the greatest real estate returns in history to the astute investor owner. But, furthermore I would like to emphasize that LENDING in those same years had the worst returns in decades. Get it right Bubble Heads!

    Very good Ray!

    I’d put it another way. Determining how someone did in real estate by looking at the time they bought and sold is like determining how they did in the stock market by looking at the DJIA during the time they were in.

    I suspect there are a handful of flippers out there who have been making money the past 10 years, notwithstanding the gyrations of the economy.

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  16. 16
    Ray pepper says:

    Not even flippers Kary. Countless thousands who stopped paying, lived for free, got loan mods with principle reduction. Then you have countless thousands that kept their home as a rental during this time. Countless others who have not paid for nearly 7 years now by challenging their foreclosure. Then those who still own their home while challenging through mediation and not to mention the hamster wheelers. It goes on and on.

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  17. 17
    Feedback says:

    Tim, you’re very smart. Thank you for being here in a world where so many real estate men are stupid.

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  18. 18
    Ray pepper says:

    RE: Feedback @ 17 – Tim is not that smart. He’s just surrounded by FOOLS that make him APPEAR to have a few more functioning brain cells.

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  19. 19
    David Losh says:

    RE: Marc @ 12

    I really like this comment because it distinguishes market timing from location.

    Good location is always the upper hand no matter what the market place.

    Just by sheer speculation, no research involved, I would say that you had more choices of homes to buy in 2007. Now your choices are limited by supply so, maybe there are no places to trade into that would be better.

    Timing the market may be tough, but buying the right house in the right location, that you can enjoy, is always a win.

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  20. 20
    toad37 says:

    Anyone know if on the 1035exchange rule some of the money can go into a 2nd home, either vacation or rental, and either in state or out of state. Thanks.

    And I agree with Marc and David, it took me about an hour to see there is not much out there if I sell and want to find something else. I think I may be sitting on a nice gain, and would like to consider options if I sell. Wish I new when the foreclosures would be back on the market.

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  21. 21

    RE: toad37 @ 20 – I assume you mean 1031.

    Out of state shouldn’t be an issue. A rental house shouldn’t be an issue, but whatever you do, make sure you don’t claim your loan is for a second home you’ll be staying at as a second home (to get the lower loan rate). We quit referring clients to a lender who tried to do that.

    If it’s just a second home you’d not be renting out then you’d have to pay tax, but I don’t know how that’s determined when it’s only part of the proceeds.

    And finally, of course you should get proper legal advice on all of this before you do anything. If you’re contemplating a 1031 exchange, they should be able to guide you, but you might also want to consult a tax attorney. It may be that a 1031 exchange doesn’t make sense for your particular situation, and a tax attorney could be best able to guide you there.

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  22. 22
    toad37 says:

    @Kary,
    Yes, 1031. Thanks for thoughtful comments. It would be all cash deal(s).

    It may be a pipe dream, but I was contemplating buying a place in Seattle or Juanita area and then a second home in Phoenix or Tucson area. My fear is that there are not many deals at the moment; even if I did get a great price for my place.

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  23. 23
    redmondjp says:

    RE: toad37 @ 22 – My dad did a 1031 exchange (three duplexes for his current house) about 13 years ago. The deal is, you can’t use the ‘new’ property as your residence for some indefinite (ie not clearly defined in the law) period – it has to be used for business purposes. He rented out the new place for the first several years, used it as a vacation/social function house for another few years, and finally moved in a few years ago. Consult your tax attorney for your own situation.

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  24. 24
    Azucar says:

    By Mike @ 10:

    That sharp gold blazer really helps add credibility though.

    And the ‘stache!!! When someone with a mustache like that asks you a rhetorical question, unless you have stones the size of bowling balls you don’t give a sassy answer. It just isn’t done. Probably because you know that the guy either has connections in the porn industry OR he’s taken enough abuse for that hairy growth on his lip that he can now dish it out with the best of them.

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  25. 25
    David Losh says:

    RE: redmondjp @ 23RE: toad37 @ 22

    You need a 1031 Exchange Facilitator, and consult your tax specialist. A tax attorney may not be as aware of issues as much as the Facilitator is.

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  26. 26

    By toad37 @ 22:

    @Kary,
    Yes, 1031. Thanks for thoughtful comments. It would be all cash deal(s).

    It may be a pipe dream, but I was contemplating buying a place in Seattle or Juanita area and then a second home in Phoenix or Tucson area. My fear is that there are not many deals at the moment; even if I did get a great price for my place.

    “My place?” Maybe take a step back. You cannot start a 1031 exchange selling a personal residence (at least if it’s been a personal residence for a significant time–I don’t know what the limitations are on that.) Basically it has to be an investment type property sold and replaced with another investment type property (and I don’t remember the limitations on precisely what types of properties are included). That’s why I said you could buy a rental house, but not a second house you would live in sometimes (e.g. an ocean cabin). There is, however, a 250,000/500,000 exception for selling a personal residence.

    Again, best to discuss all of this with a tax attorney or accountant–one preferably with no connections to a 1031 exchange facilitator.

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  27. 27

    By redmondjp @ 23:

    RE: toad37 @ 22 – My dad did a 1031 exchange (three duplexes for his current house) about 13 years ago. The deal is, you can’t use the ‘new’ property as your residence for some indefinite (ie not clearly defined in the law) period> – it has to be used for business purposes. He rented out the new place for the first several years, used it as a vacation/social function house for another few years, and finally moved in a few years ago. Consult your tax attorney for your own situation.

    Last I heard, case law still had that period as roughly one year, but I haven’t looked into that issue for probably 4 or 5 years, and then it was only to ask others in the industry.

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  28. 28

    By David Losh @ 25:

    RE: redmondjp @ 23RE: toad37 @ 22

    You need a 1031 Exchange Facilitator, and consult your tax specialist. A tax attorney may not be as aware of issues as much as the Facilitator is.

    Do you just make this stuff up? 1031 exchanges are not that complicated for tax attorneys or tax accountants to figure out. And they can better determine the person’s overall situation to know whether it makes sense or not. For example, a 1031 exchange might make a lot of sense for a married couple both in their 80s.

    Ask a 1031 exchange facilitator and you’ll get the type of nonsense I’ve complained about–not even knowing that doing a 1031 exchange affects the basis going forward. They want the fees of doing a 1031 exchange, and that can affect their answer.

    Asking a 1031 exchange facilitator whether you should do a 1031 exchange is like asking a attorney who negotiates short sales whether you should do a short sale. Asking a 1031 exchange facilitator whether you should do a 1031 exchange is like asking a real estate agent whether you should buy or sell (as opposed to asking them to help you buy or sell).

    It’s sort of like what I’ve been complaining about on attorneys advising homeowners in financial distress. Attorneys that negotiate short sales will be more likely to recommend the owner do a short sale. Attorneys that do bankruptcy will be more likely to recommend a bankruptcy. Neither of them may fully understand the tax consequences of either action.

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  29. 29
    corndogs says:

    RE: Erik @ 7 – “RE: Ron @ 6 –
    You must listen to the indicators somewhat if you’ve been successful.”

    Do not talk about success little larva until you emerge from the cocoon.. When you get to the other side it’s far more likely you’ll be a dung beetle than a butterfly….

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  30. 30
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 28RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 27RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 26

    I have a cracker jack accountant that I would consult long before I would attempt to bring a tax attorney up to speed. My accountant is much more familiar with my financial situation.

    Hey! Wait I do have a tax attorney on retainer, but I would still go to my accountant first.

    1031 Exchanges aren’t that complicated, but you need both, advise, and the means to get it done.

    You should never seek legal advise on a blog.

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  31. 31

    RE: David Losh @ 30 – In two of those three posts I said tax attorney or accountant. That I didn’t say both in one was just oversight.

    In general I think accountants are much better at planning than attorneys on tax matters. Taking a tax course in business school is fun because they do address the planning. Taking a tax course in law school isn’t as much fun, because they deal more in results.

    In any case, the last post was responding more to your claim that a tax attorney might not be aware of the issues as well as a 1031 facilitator. That would be like saying that a real estate attorney wouldn’t be as aware of legal issues as a real estate broker.

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  32. 32
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 31

    No, it means a tax attorney would have to research current 1031 Exchange code, because it isn’t what a tax attorney does. I would rather hire some one with experience.

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  33. 33

    By David Losh @ 32:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 31 – No, it means a tax attorney would have to research current 1031 Exchange code, because it isn’t what a tax attorney does.

    LOL. You obviously don’t have a clue what a tax attorney does or what a tax accountant does. There’s no particular reason a tax attorney would have less current experience with 1031 exchanges than a tax accountant. And both tax attorneys and tax accountants do research. One might be cheaper than the other doing that research.

    Which guess at least answers my question in post 28: Do you just make this stuff up? Rather obviously the answer is yes.

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  34. 34
    toad37 says:

    Thanks guys, I guess I was way off on the 1031 thing.

    Basically, what I was wanting to do was roll money from a primary residence condo that I will have owned for two years, then roll all the money into a new primary residence condo/or SFR and some into an out of state 2nd home condo.

    If I had to pay taxes on capital gains, it may throw a wrench in it. Sorry for the confusion.

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  35. 35
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 33

    I said my accountant, I wouldn’t go to an attorney for this.

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  36. 36
    ARDELL says:

    RE: toad37 @ 34

    You shouldn’t have any capital gain taxes on the sale of a principal residence you have owned for two years. You don’t need to roll the money into something else anymore. That requirement has been gone for quite some time now.

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  37. 37

    RE: David Losh @ 35 – David, no one but you is talking about your accountant (or your tax attorney) and no one but you cares which one you go to. What we’re talking about here is what someone should do if they are considering a 1031 exchange. The answer to that question is to talk to a tax attorney or tax accountant.

    I have no idea why you want to bring up so many nonsense sidetracks to arguments. I answered the question and you just bring up a bunch of nonsense which doesn’t in any way add to the conversation. First you claim that they should talk to an exchange facilitator, and then when you back down from that you go to the specifics of your own particular tax accountant. You’ve added nothing to this discussion.

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  38. 38

    RE: toad37 @ 34 – By ARDELL @ 36:

    RE: toad37 @ 34

    You shouldn’t have any capital gain taxes on the sale of a principal residence you have owned for two years. You don’t need to roll the money into something else anymore. That requirement has been gone for quite some time now.

    That’s generally correct, but even there I would talk to a tax professional first before locking yourself in. In this particular case though I would think the only thing that might cause some taxation would be having taken a home office deduction, and that taxation would probably be minimal.

    The advantage to the primary residence exception is you can do whatever you want with the money. It makes me sick when people pass up the personal residence exception, and that exception was a significant part of the reason we sold our old house in 2007. You can’t beat tax free income. A 1031 exchange only defers the recognition of income to a later date. If you could do a 1031 exchange on a property that qualifies for the personal residence exception, that would probably be a huge mistake in most situations.

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  39. 39
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 38RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 37

    Because Kary for sure you added nothing here.

    You started dispensing advice that the individual should get elsewhere other than from a blog.

    You started in on the attorneys, and what they learned in school, and a bunch of random nonsense you had no business introducing in order to sound important I guess.

    Ardell, has now answered the question, but we still don’t know this individual’s circumstances, and a blog isn’t a place to get this kind of advice.

    You don’t like my advice? Then stop flogging your own dead horse, and leave it alone.

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  40. 40
    Ray pepper says:

    U all remind me of the characters in silver linings play book!

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  41. 41

    By David Losh @ 39:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 38RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 37

    Because Kary for sure you added nothing here.

    Yes, you are absolutely correct. Pointing out that he can’t do a 1031 exchange on a personal residence, and that there’s a tax free way of selling personal residences added nothing. /sarc

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  42. 42

    By David Losh @ 39:

    Ardell, has now answered the question,

    For your information, post 26 came before post 36. I realize that is high level math for you because you don’t have that many toes and fingers, so I thought I would point that out.

    but we still don’t know this individual’s circumstances, and a blog isn’t a place to get this kind of advice.

    Also, for your information, I agree a blog isn’t the place to get this kind of advice, that’s why I recommended talking to a tax attorney or an accountant. Again, something apparently still don’t understand.

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  43. 43
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 42RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 41RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 26

    Not your place at all counselor.

    and comment 25 comes before 26.

    This is just another dead horse for you to flog.

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  44. 44
    toad37 says:

    Thanks Ardell and Kary.

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  45. 45
    Erik says:

    RE: Corndogs @ 29
    Ha ha ha. I like to talk like i’m established cause everyone else on here does. Just trying to fit in. Personally, I wouldn’t take my advice. I am kinda guessing.

    You are a good writer, but it sounds like you aren’t that good at real estate based on previous blogs about your property in gig harbor that failed. You know, the one where you were fighting with losh and the tim felt it was necessary to come out and bash you too.

    I do think I will be successful though. I will be honest and tell you on this website if I fail. The place I own is successful so far. I think I could sell it for 180. I bought it for 92 and put 15 into it.

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  46. 46
    ray pepper says:

    RE: Erik @ 45 – Hey Erik..Little advice for you. Don’t take ANYONES advice here. The buffoons on this blog are rampant. Don’t believe me?….They will give you advice even if you don’t ask for it…..I think Sam says it best: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B34DmsMxUlA

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  47. 47

    By David Losh @ 43:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 42RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 41RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 26
    and comment 25 comes before 26.
    .

    Comment 25 was Losh nonsense–the one you just made up and answer because you thought it would sound good. I’ve already addressed why that was nonsense, but it apparently went over your head.

    In other words, being first doesn’t count if you’re wrong and give misleading and incorrect advice to someone here.

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  48. 48

    By toad37 @ 44:

    Thanks Ardell and Kary.

    You’re welcome. You might also want to check out these links, but they’re no substitute for consulting with a tax attorney or tax accountant.

    http://www.irs.gov/uac/Like-Kind-Exchanges-Under-IRC-Code-Section-1031

    http://www.irs.gov/publications/p523/ar02.html

    Thinking about this further it’s probably unlikely you’d want to do a 1031 exchange even if you did qualify. If you’ve owned the condo for only two years it’s unlikely you’d have over $50,000 gain after costs of sale, and so your tax hit wouldn’t be that significant. Balanced against that would be the costs of doing the 1031 and the time limits imposed. That’s the type of analysis that a tax attorney or accountant could help you with in a more impartial manner than an exchange facilitator. I would also point out that many facilitator entities are more like escrows, and may not have the staff that can provide legal advice, but again I wouldn’t trust that advice to be impartial as to result even if they had attorneys or accountants you could deal with.

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  49. 49

    RE: ray pepper @ 46 – Yes, clearly he should take advice from the agent who advises his clients to pull an offer any time another offer comes in, but can’t justify or explain that advice. That’s buffoonery at it’s best.

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  50. 50

    By David Losh @ 39:

    You started in on the attorneys, and what they learned in school, and a bunch of random nonsense you had no business introducing in order to sound important I guess.

    I let this go yesterday, but since I called you out as a hypocrite in the other thread, I might as well point out another example.

    You think my having explained the difference in how attorneys and accountants are taught was done to make me “sound important.” I think that’s important information, and something only someone having been taught both ways would know. Accountants are taught to be more planners and attorneys more problem solvers–often problems after the fact.

    But in post 30 you say:

    My accountant is much more familiar with my financial situation.

    Hey! Wait I do have a tax attorney on retainer, but I would still go to my accountant first.

    The only reason you said “on retainer” is to sound important. “On retainer” can mean a few things, but in your case all it likely means is that your tax attorney wants funds in their trust account before they work for you. It doesn’t mean you’re some special client to an unnamed tax attorney.

    Hypocrites make me sick, which is part of the reason I don’t like you.

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  51. 51
    Erik says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 48
    I think Ray’s logic was that it’s better to just move to the next place to see if your lowball offer will be accepted as opposed to bidding for a moderate deal. This is a strategy to purchase homes undervalue. If you travel around and make lowball offers to everyone, eventually you’ll get one due to probability.

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  52. 52

    RE: Erik @ 51 – But how would you know that the other buyer wasn’t doing the same thing and had made an even lower offer? Your bid could be accepted, and if you were willing to make it, why would another offer you know nothing about cause you to withdraw the offer?

    I could see withdrawing an offer if you found a better place, but that wouldn’t be dependent on another offer having come in. I almost always have a client sign a withdrawal of offer just for that possibility (and other possibilities that might not be so good for the client).

    In this market buying a place that doesn’t have multiple offers may mean that you’re either paying too much or buying something no one else wants. It also might mean you’re just lucky, but if you’re getting a bargain on a good house and there is no other offer you’re very very lucky. I’ve seen that happen, so it’s not impossible.

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  53. 53
    Ray pepper says:

    RE: Erik @ 50 – sorry Erik. We don’t write up offers hoping they will “Stick”. We only write up offers that have high probabilities of closing. As of late we have a huge bias toward Trustee Sale properties due to increasing volume of homes each Friday and the current high demand in the retail MLS arena.

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  54. 54
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 49

    No, counselor it means I pay him on an ongoing basis.

    You don’t let anything go, but you should move on.

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  55. 55
    Erik says:

    RE: Ray pepper @ 52
    I see. I will check this out Thursday if I can get a break here from work.

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  56. 56
    ray pepper says:

    David, don’t let people bother you here. We are all friends. Don’t take anything personal. Just move on and do like Sweet Brown says ” Ain’t nobody got time for that”..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po3jPq5LT0g

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  57. 57

    By David Losh @ 54:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 49

    No, counselor it means I pay him on an ongoing basis.

    You don’t let anything go, but you should move on.

    As I said, there are a number of meanings to that term. That, however, is not one I’m familiar with. That would just mean you are a client of the attorney.

    Again, you used the term “on retainer” to try to sound more important.

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  58. 58
    ec says:

    From 2005-2009 I read this blog non-stop and learned a lot. I came back for the first time in years and saw the same garbage being spewed by the same people. Funny how some people waste their lives.

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  59. 59
    David Losh says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 56

    semantics?

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