The Sordid Price History of a Local Mega-Flop

Behold the sordid tale of a home I’ve been keeping my eye on for quite a while. It’s a spec-built home in Woodinville (just a 37-minute + $3.50 toll drive to downtown Seattle)—7,216 square feet on 14 acres. This one’s got the Avondale Albatross beat by a longshot, both in the sheer audacity of the project and in the scope of the resulting fiasco.

Before I give you the link to the home, have a look at this price history that I compiled by digging through my past email alerts, county records, and personal notes on this home:

  • 07/12/2005: Lot purchased for $315,000
  • 10/06/2005: Construction loan taken out for $1,200,000
  • 02/20/2007: Loan refinanced, boosted to $1,800,000
  • 03/06/2007: Additional $350,000 financed, total $2,150,000
  • 07/09/2007: Newly-finished home listed at $2,695,000
  • 09/07/2007: Price drop to $2,595,000
  • 11/27/2007: Price drop to $2,350,000
  • 06/20/2008: Price drop to $2,100,000
  • 07/20/2008: Delisted
  • 08/08/2008: Relisted at $3,000,000 (new listing agent)
  • 08/21/2008: Price drop to $2,300,000
  • 10/09/2008: Price drop to $2,100,000
  • 10/24/2008: Price drop to $1,900,500 – now officially a short sale
  • 11/18/2008: Delisted
  • 11/18/2008: Relisted at $1,900,500
  • 01/22/2009: Price drop to $1,800,500
  • 02/11/2009: Price drop to $1,750,000
  • 03/03/2009: Price drop to $1,699,995
  • 03/10/2009: Price drop to $1,650,000
  • 03/23/2009: Price drop to $1,500,000
  • 09/11/2009: Price drop to $1,250,000
  • 10/06/2009: Delisted
  • 10/07/2009: Relisted at $1,250,000
  • 10/17/2009: Price drop to $1,195,000
  • 11/12/2009: Price drop to $1,175,000
  • 12/02/2009: Pending
  • 08/23/2010: Back on market
  • 08/23/2010: Price drop to $1,000,000
  • 11/23/2010: Pending
  • 03/16/2011: Back on market
  • 06/07/2011: Price drop to $900,000
  • 06/15/2011: Pending
  • 02/27/2012: Sold for $500,000

For those keeping score at home, that’s 83% off the peak asking price, and 77% off the total amount financed to build it.

Ouch.

Here’s the link: 22325 NE Old Woodinville-Duvall Road, and here’s the data above in chart form:

Wistful in Woodinville

I’m sure that the surprisingly low final sale price was related to this bit, which appeared in the listing description near the end of its nearly five-year run:

As-Is condition – bank is aware of damage. Please be aware there is mold present.

Nothing like buying a brand new mansion that’s already got mold problems.

I wonder if the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act applies to “investment” homes like this. For the builder’s sake, I certainly hope so. Wouldn’t that just be a giant slap in the face to throw away so much money on this beast only to have the IRS subsequently come after you for taxes as if you had earned $1.6 million.

This is easily the biggest flop I’ve seen in the Seattle area during the post-bubble crash. Can anyone else beat an 83% discount off peak list?


About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

61 comments:

  1. 1

    That’s One Big Advantage Modular Homes Have Over Stick Built On Lots

    They build ’em on assembly tools and without rain pouring on them during construction, they’re built inside a manufacturing facility. Another anomaly in construction likely causing leaks/mold from out of tolerance construction is green lumber…..it was a problem decades ago, I wonder if its propped its ugly head again?

  2. 2

    My off the top of the head, not yet enough caffeine in my system, answer on the tax question is that a contractor wouldn’t need the debt relief act. They could claim the loss on the sale, which would offset any debt relief income.. In contrast, consumers cannot claim a loss on the sale of their house.

  3. 3

    Looking at the listing, it appears to be possibly another case of bank stupidity. They had a couple of other offers before, in 2009 and 2010, but apparently the bank didn’t approve them as a short sale. That probably not only cost them money (and interest) but also probably allowed the conditions which created the mold.

  4. 4

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 3

    Or the Buyer(s) Didn’t Qualify?

  5. 5

    RE: softwarengineer @ 4 – Or possibly it failed inspection back then. I only said that was a possibility.

  6. 6

    Multi-Million Dollar Home Foreclosures ON THE RISE

    “…And things just may get worse before they get better. More than 36,000 homes valued at $1 million or more were foreclosed on — or at least served with a notice of default — last year. That number is likely to rise in 2012, according to Daren Blomquist, vice president of RealtyTrac. 8 multi-million dollar foreclosures “The longer the tough economy persists, the more of these high-end homeowners will eventually succumb to foreclosure,” Blomquist said.
    After the Buchanans lose their home, they plan to move into a small rental property they can afford. “We probably won’t be able to buy anything for a long, long time,” John said….”

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/million-dollar-foreclosure-buchanans-2-110500193.html

  7. 7
    Peter Witting says:

    Not only does the buyer get the opportunity to battle mold, he also gets to pay more than $17,000 a year in property taxes (based on a valuation of $1,477,000) for the privilege of doing so.

    Question – during the time the property was bank-owned, how are those taxes handled? Who pays them? Would there be liens against the house?

  8. 8

    RE: Peter Witting @ 7 – The property wasn’t bank owned. If it were, however, the taxes would continue to accrue. The taxes come ahead of mortgage liens (and there is no personal liability for such taxes). They would likely be paid at time of closing out of the sellers’ proceeds, reducing the net paid to the bank.

    If Fannie or Freddie had owned the property (or a national bank???) they would not have to pay the real estate excise transfer tax.

  9. 9
    Feedback says:

    That’s pretty good news — the land has appreciated in price more than 50% in just 7 years. Who says real estate is a poor investment?

  10. 10
    Ross says:

    I love the looks of that land. 14 acres within a 30 minute drive of metro Seattle and extremely close to Google and Microsoft.

  11. 11
    David Losh says:

    But the bank lent money; money was made. The land owner who sold made money. The builder made money, they made money on the refinance, and I’ll bet there is a lawsuit againt the drywall supplier.

    Was this a case, or the case, of the moldy Chinese drywall?

    Anyway I’ll bet going from $300K for a lot to $2 Million Dollars in bank loans made some body, or a lot of some bodies, profits.

  12. 12

    RE: David Losh @ 11 – Only you would think that a bank made money loaning over $2,000,000 and recovering less than $500,000.

    The problem with Chinese drywall wasn’t mold (although most drywall is more susceptible to mold than plaster).

  13. 13

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 12

    You’re Right Kary

    If I remember right it was like the dog, seafood and baby food from China….toxic garbage in it.

  14. 14
    Ben says:

    I have been following this for years too. When the price started coming down it piqued my interest, and then I saw the mold comment.

    I would be surprised if it was really a spec house. It seemed more like a custom built for a big family.

  15. 15
    Howard says:

    If only they didn’t waste so much time in the renovations.. 2 years from purchase to on the market. could hold be able to start from bare ground and get it done in less than a year.

    What were there carrying costs till they got it on the market? $100k?

    Obviously in over their heads with the extended timeline and having to go back to the bank repeatedly. Poor planning and management…

    They must be the same people who work on highway projects?!

  16. 16
    The Tim says:

    By Ben @ 14:

    I would be surprised if it was really a spec house. It seemed more like a custom built for a big family.

    “Spec” = speculative. As in, they built it without having a buyer already lined up, on the speculation that they would be able to sell it at a profit upon completion.

    By Howard @ 15:

    If only they didn’t waste so much time in the renovations.. 2 years from purchase to on the market. could hold be able to start from bare ground and get it done in less than a year.

    I’m pretty sure they did build this from the ground up. I highly doubt it was just a renovation of an existing structure. Not sure whether there was anything standing on the lot when they bought it, but even if they didn’t have to tear down an existing structure, getting the permits and government approval to build this thing no doubt added to the timeline above and beyond just what it would have taken to physically construct.

  17. 17

    RE: Ross @ 10

    Speaking of MSFT and Potential Real Estate Draw

    Sounds like a long deflated bubble balloon to me and to this stock advisor:

    “…I really don’t think so… Investing in Microsoft seems like suicide. I’d rather have my money in a piggy bank.

    I’ve owned Microsoft stock and watched it do virtually nothing. It’s not fun. For some reason I had this belief that they are going to make a come back. I highly doubt it now….”

    http://www.landofsheep.com/is-microsoft-a-good-buy-going-into-2012

    Now, if you already work at MSFT and you have the cash to bulldoze this mold mansion down for the land to rebuild, how much would that cost BTW?

  18. 18
    mukoh says:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 17 – Not sure if MS is that bad, I did good from recent low of $25 to $31 when I was out. :) Puts a smile on my face. ;) Not as good as RIMM Apr Puts for a week, but still great.

  19. 19
    Peter Witting says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 8 – thank you for answering my question, Kary. I mixed up short sale with bank-owned. Now I see where the Mortgage Forgiveness act comes into play.

  20. 20
    Peter Witting says:

    “Now, if you already work at MSFT and you have the cash to bulldoze this mold mansion down for the land to rebuild, how much would that cost BTW?”

    I was wondering that same question. Strip the house of everything valuable, buldoze to the footprint, and then rebuild. Or possibly less drastic, like a gut renovation…?

    thoughts?

  21. 21

    Question:Did this turn into a bank-owned REO before it finally sold or was it a short sale? Thanks, guys.

  22. 22
    The Tim says:

    RE: Jill Schlicke @ 21 – Not from what I can tell. King County records show it being privately owned for the entire time between the 2005 and 2012 sales.

  23. 23
    redmondjp says:

    Hmmm, lessee, total property tax for 2011 divided by 12, carry the 1, holy carp Fishman! That’s $1445 PER MONTH just for the property taxes! That’s more than my entire monthly PITI! So even with the extremely discounted price, massive sweat-equity DIY to resolve the mold and other unknown issues, I still couldn’t afford it. The commute would be a bear as well . . .

    And as far as the 14 acres goes, I’m pretty sure that this is outside of the urban growth boundary, so there are limitations on how much it can be carved up . . .

    And . . . I happen to know somebody who lives just down that road, and with the overhead power lines and copius mature trees in that area, you had better have a portable generator due to the winter storm-related power outages. My friends were out for an entire week back in 2007.

  24. 24
    Redneck Nerd says:

    I’ve been watching this house for years since I drive past it every time I visit a friend who lives a block away from this property. I had wanted to develop the lot myself when it was vacant, but the lot price was too inflated for anything more then an average house. The 14 acre lot the houses are on is mostly hill and swamp. The hill has a view of the traffic on Woodinville Duvall road which isn’t exactly a minor arterial. The developer really went overboard building such a large set of houses (house and MIL) on this lot. The MIL is bigger than a lot of houses in other parts of town, and is close to the size I was thinking of building, not the McMansion that is the main house. Go look at http://www.kingcounty.gov/operations/GIS/Maps/iMAP.aspx and check out the lot using the iMAP – Sensitive Areas overlay. The lot has sensitive area notices on the title, and a large part is marked for a mix of erosion (top) and wetland (bottom). As the previous poster mentions, the power goes out quite a bit in the area because of the trees, and the road has been closed on a couple of occasions as well. Access to the property is much less then ideal, especially in bad conditions.

    This is a “poster child” for bubble risk/greed, and what not to do. I’m really curious to see what happens to it over the next decade.

  25. 25

    Tim…WOW. Which bank/lender(s) took the haircut? Just curious.

  26. 26
    The Tim says:

    RE: Jill Schlicke @ 25 – The primary 2007 loan was with Countrywide, so who knows which bank ended up buying the loan. Probably they didn’t pay full price for it anyway. I’d bet most of the loss for the bank came when Countrywide went under. Similar to the home I bought, where the original 2006 loan was with Weyerhaeuser Mortgage Company, but by the time I bought it in a short sale for nearly 40% off the original loan amount, we were dealing with Ocwen Financial Corporation.

  27. 27

    Right so maybe some other entity held the paper but Ocwen was the servicer on your home.
    RE the Woodinville home…a lot of those C-wide loans were sold to Fannie.

  28. 28
    Pegasus says:

    RE: The Tim @ 26 – Ah….Countrywide never went under….Bank of America bought them in 2008. Who knows whether Countrywide still held the paper when the buyout closed.

  29. 29
    John Bailo says:

    Yikes.

    If a gigantic 4-bedroom home on 14 acres (!) is worth $500,000, then proportionally a typical regular home on a standard plot is worth like $50,000 !!

  30. 30
    wreckingbull says:

    In theory, this is a screaming deal. No arguments there.

    In reality, it is a very expensive and noisy home in which to live. It has a very large attack surface in terms of property taxes. $1500 a month just for the right to live in your own home is pretty darn expensive. The energy needed to heat a 7K square foot is going to cost you. It’s location is 30 yards from a busy road.

    Just a reminder to everyone in Ray’s Gem Camp. You still have to live in the home you buy, so act accordingly.

  31. 31
    whee says:

    It is 14 acres of wet ravine, which is not worth anywhere near what people charge for it. There are a lot of ‘acreage’ parcels with homes on them that consist mainly of ravine/cliff and/or wetlands. It’s more common up in Snohomish County, though.

  32. 32

    By John Bailo @ 29:

    Yikes.

    If a gigantic 4-bedroom home on 14 acres (!) is worth $500,000, then proportionally a typical regular home on a standard plot is worth like $50,000 !!

    Throw in mold, and that’s probably about right.

  33. 33

    RE: mukoh @ 18

    YOY You’re Absolutely Right

    Do a 3YR History Longterm Look:

    http://investing.money.msn.com/investments/equity-charts?CA=0&CB=0&CC=0&CD=0&D4=1&DD=1&D5=0&DCS=2&MA0=0&MA1=0&C5=0&C5D=0&C6=0&C7=0&C7D=0&C8=0&C9=0&CF=0&D8=0&DB=0&DC=0&D9=0&DA=0&D1=0&symbol=MSFT&SZ=0&PT=8

    Now its flat as a pancake on a linear regression analysis.

    You may want to sell NOW. Good investing BTW, cash in your chips.

  34. 34
    joe dirt says:

    Doesn’t look like all the money that was borrowed went into the construction.

    Could it be like “The Producers” – you borrow a bunch of money, say the project flopped and you are bankrupt, without having actually spent what was borrowed?

  35. 35

    By joe dirt @ 34:

    Doesn’t look like all the money that was borrowed went into the construction.

    Could it be like “The Producers” – you borrow a bunch of money, say the project flopped and you are bankrupt, without having actually spent what was borrowed?

    It could have gone into some other business. People with businesses often have to guarantee their loans and/or encumber their homes.

  36. 36
    deejayoh says:

    By The Tim @ 26:

    RE: Jill Schlicke @ 25 – The primary 2007 loan was with Countrywide, so who knows which bank ended up buying the loan. Probably they didn’t pay full price for it anyway. I’d bet most of the loss for the bank came when Countrywide went under. Similar to the home I bought, where the original 2006 loan was with Weyerhaeuser Mortgage Company, but by the time I bought it in a short sale for nearly 40% off the original loan amount, we were dealing with Ocwen Financial Corporation.

    By Jill Schlicke @ 27:

    Right so maybe some other entity held the paper but Ocwen was the servicer on your home.
    RE the Woodinville home…a lot of those C-wide loans were sold to Fannie.

    Was this a mortgage or a construction loan? Spec house, under construction, I would not think would qualify for a mortgage but stranger things happened in the boom

    But in either case, it was most certainly not a loan that could have been turned back to Fannie/Freddie. It was not a conforming loan

  37. 37
    deejayoh says:

    By wreckingbull @ 30:

    In theory, this is a screaming deal. No arguments there.

    In reality, it is a very expensive and noisy home in which to live. It has a very large attack surface in terms of property taxes. $1500 a month just for the right to live in your own home is pretty darn expensive. The energy needed to heat a 7K square foot is going to cost you. It’s location is 30 yards from a busy road.

    Just a reminder to everyone in Ray’s Gem Camp. You still have to live in the home you buy, so act accordingly.

    I’m sure the new owners are not crying. New construction for $75/sq foot, and it’s more like 75 yards from the road if one is to believe the map. I bet they can get their taxes reduced based on the purchase price.

  38. 38
    domo says:

    2531551 20120227001838 2/22/2012 $500,000.00 WILLIS ANTHONY MAH FOUNDATION LLC Statutory Warranty Deed None

    So who is MAH FOUNDATION LLC? Who are they? Quick search shows them as a non-profit org in Florida – maybe a different MAH…

    Doesn’t look like a private buyer

  39. 39
    The Tim says:

    By domo @ 38:

    So who is MAH FOUNDATION LLC? Who are they? Quick search shows them as a non-profit org in Florida – maybe a different MAH…

    Wrong one: http://www.sos.wa.gov/corps/search_detail.aspx?ubi=603069333

    MAH FOUNDATION, LLC
    UBI Number 603069333
    Category LLC
    Active/Inactive Active
    State Of Incorporation WA
    WA Filing Date 12/10/2010
    Expiration Date 12/31/2012
    Duration Perpetual
    Registered Agent Information
    Agent Name ALI HERAVI
    Address 17221 NE 131ST ST
    Suite 1730
    City REDMOND
    State WA
    ZIP 98052

    I guess you’d have to ask Mr. Heravi if you wanted to know what they intend to do with the property now.

  40. 40
    domo says:

    There is a remodeling business owned by a person of the same name as the manager of Mah Foundation LLC in Tumwater.

    So, maybe a flipper?

  41. 41
    domo says:

    regardless, it needs guts. Don’t know how bad the mold problem is but it can’t be that bad. I would how much would be cost to fix that issue.

  42. 42
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: deejayoh @ 37 – The fact that they got it for such a good price does not protect them in the long run from high property taxes. Yes, they may get a little respite, but I would not pin much hope on that lasting.

    The road noise issue is of course a personal opinion. One thing I have noticed is that those who move here from California seem to care much less about road noise. We all have our different values, and my post was obviously showing mine. You are right, no one is crying, (unless the mold spores are getting in their eyes) :) Sorry, could not resist.

  43. 43
    ray pepper says:

    Lot purchased for 315K? Bargain compared to Millionnaire Mike who paid 1.3 mill and then had to BULL DOZE the home prior to starting up again with construction….Ahhh yess…Millionnaire Mike doesn’t know what his home is worth and is NOT interested in selling…………thats the caveat……………..until……………………………..he must sell…………….. and then his numbers will resemble the above..

    Then all of you will be singing a different tune in/re to his WONDERFUL home……..and for that matter his Condo which sits, and sits, and sits on the market waiting for a miracle..or at least an offer.

  44. 44
    The Tim says:

    RE: ray pepper @ 43 – Holy crap Ray, drop it with the rage against Mike D. Seriously, you’re just making yourself look ultra-petty.

  45. 45
    redmondjp says:

    And what’s also interesting is that Mr. Heravi has listed a single-family home address in Redmond with a (bogus?) suite number on the LLC paperwork. Is this supposed to fool anybody?

  46. 46
    The Tim says:

    RE: redmondjp @ 45 – Hah, I hadn’t noticed that. Also interesting… said house is for sale (pending)… as a short sale. Despite having been purchased in 1991: http://www.redfin.com/WA/Redmond/17221-NE-131st-St-98052/home/450516

    Redfin Agent Insight:

    Home in the middle of a major renovation, floorplan flows, but every room is in need of attention, its hard to put a dollar amount on the product. Enter at own risk.

    Hmm… Time for the next big project, I guess?

  47. 47
    redmondjp says:

    By The Tim @ 46:

    RE: redmondjp @ 45 – Hah, I hadn’t noticed that. Also interesting… said house is for sale (pending)… as a short sale. Despite having been purchased in 1991: http://www.redfin.com/WA/Redmond/17221-NE-131st-St-98052/home/450516

    Redfin Agent Insight:

    Home in the middle of a major renovation, floorplan flows, but every room is in need of attention, its hard to put a dollar amount on the product. Enter at own risk.

    Hmm…

    Ahhh, that explains the hanging tarps on the front of the house that can be seen in the street view from Google maps. I wonder how long ago the street view images were taken.

  48. 48
    ray pepper says:

    RE: The Tim @ 44

    The buffoon/liar insulted my Avatar that was constructed with many hours of R&D. For that he will suffer my wrath until his house hits the MLS. When this occurs I will politely remind Mike that real estate is ALWAYS an investment. Some very much worse then others!

  49. 49
  50. 50

    RE: ray pepper @ 48 – How about accepting the fact that he thinks as little of your choice of avatar as you do of his choice of property?

  51. 51
  52. 52
    Blurtman says:

    Ocwen is a scumbag organization, in part composed of criminal enterprise Litton Loan Servicing, a Goldman Sachs discard. Fuck Ocwen!

    “Ocwen Financial Corporation (NYSE: OCN) is a provider of residential and commercial mortgage loan servicing, special servicing and asset management services. Ocwen is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, with additional offices in West Palm Beach and Orlando, Florida, and Washington, D.C. It also has operations in Uruguay and India.[1]

    Following its acquisition of Litton Loan Servicing from Goldman Sachs in September 2011, Ocwen became the largest subprime mortgage servicer in the U.S.[2] On October 24, 2011, Morgan Stanley announced the sale of Saxon Mortgage Services, Inc. to Ocwen.[3] (The transaction is targeted to close in the first quarter of 2012.)”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocwen

  53. 53
    The Tim says:

    RE: Blurtman @ 52 – All I know about Ocwen is from my personal experience buying a short sale for which they held the loans. We got short sale approval in writing from them just 20 days after sending them the offer, plus they threw in $3k to the seller in moving assistance. It was a shockingly pleasant experience, given all of the short sale horror stories I’ve heard.

  54. 54
    WannaBuy2012 says:

    On a side note, even if that house was in perfect condition, someone would have to PAY me at least $100k per year to live there. I simply do not understand how and why people with a decent incomd live right on busy roads. I can’t stand it personally. And for the kids and family, what could be worse during those summer BBQ’s and lawn picnics?

  55. 55
    Scotsman says:

    RE: WannaBuy2012 @ 54

    Agreed. I wonder if it has vanity. as a root dource. Look everybody- see my huge jome! I’m so smart and so rich.

    No class or sense though.

  56. 56
    David Losh says:

    It would be interesting to know if payments were being made on the Note. Essentially all the money was taken out before the property was listed for sale.

    The only people who would be making money were the Real Estate agents.

  57. 57
    Pegasus says:

    RE: The Tim @ 53 – Hey…the crooks are very quick to recognize when they have a fish on the line and they will reel them in quickly trying not to ripple the waters and attract attention. Normally the rube… err….the fish never even knows it was caught until much later. If someone knocked on your door tomorrow and offered to buy your place for a million bucks how long would it take for you to vacate the place?

  58. 58

    RE: Scotsman @ 55 – Can you even see that house from the road?

  59. 59
    Jaysparky says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 12:

    RE: David Losh @ 11 – “Only you would think that a bank made money loaning over $2,000,000 and recovering less than $500,000.”

    @ Kary L. Krismer – You should really research exactly what happens in foreclosures and shortsales before responding foolishly. And for that matter the entire loan process. The banks have been making out like bandits on all of our loans before and after default.

    http://www.mygnhi.com/blog/banks-profit-6-figures-on-foreclosures-short-sales-heres-how/

    http://www.foreclosuresinmass.com/mortgage_securitization.aspx

  60. 60

    RE: Jaysparky @ 59 – I think the better response would be I misunderstood what Losh was saying. He was talking about builders, loan officers and agents making money.

    As to your post, that’s not what I was saying. I was talking about the bank that made the loan, and even with mortgage insurance they would have a loss of some sort.

    Of course there are ways to make money off of loans in default. I just commented this week about how at the height of the crisis mortgages were practically of no value, so obviously if they were transferred, they would be at a huge discount. Also, I’ve commented in the past how with excessive reserves for bad debt the banks were turning a profit on refinances. Technically though, that wouldn’t be a profit from inception, just a profit added to the quarterly figures.

  61. 61
    Jan says:

    I live across from this house. It was brand new, never lived in, beautiful! As it sat empty, thieves/vandals got in there and removed appliances, destroyed wood work, stripped the wiring, pulled the AC and otherwise partied in the place destroying it. Pipes froze and broke leaving the flooring warped, walls/drywall were flooded, warped and crumbled. Redoing the house was going to be a MAJOR effort. It was a spec house for a player with the Sonics who bailed when they moved.

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