About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

16 comments:

  1. 1
    Blurtman says:

    Grow room with hidden door.

  2. 2

    Garage. Preferably one that holds the furnace and water heater. I don’t understand why architects are now sometimes moving those things back inside the house.

  3. 3
    Erik says:

    RE: Blurtman @ 1
    You are on fire lately. Another great comment.

  4. 4
    Eleua says:

    Walk-in gun vault

  5. 5
    mmmarvel says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 2:

    Garage. Preferably one that holds the furnace and water heater. I don’t understand why architects are now sometimes moving those things back inside the house.

    Kary, I lived in Portland for a LONG time and was use to water heaters and furances being in the garage. Then I moved to Texas and found that they routinely put both in the attic. Eventually I hope to move them to where I think they belong. Also down here, most of the electrical boxes (the ones with all your breakers) are located on the outside of the house, usually on the back wall in the back yard. Strange things people do in different locations.

  6. 6

    RE: mmmarvel @ 7 – You see a few outside breaker boxes in this area. Slightly more common is having a main shut off outside, but that’s mainly newer places. It’s apparently supposed to be for fire department use.

    I would imagine moving a furnace would be rather expensive due to the duct work. You’d probably need to have a large duct run from the garage up to where the existing system starts. The return venting could be somewhat easier because you wouldn’t necessarily need to use the same vent points.

    On the topic of breaker boxes, I’ve noticed some newer houses now have them only about two feet off the ground in the garage. The electricians must have sat on a stool when wiring them. I’m not sure what the reason for this change is, but it seems like a rather stupid change. Do they want the owner to be grounded at the feet and knees when touching the breaker box? ;-)

  7. 7
    David B. says:

    Something else: a kitchen.

    In other words, a house with a real, separate, kitchen (a room with proper walls), not an idiotic “open floor plan” that means cooking smells and kitchen messes are part of your living room.

  8. 8
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 8 – Wheelchair accessibility.

  9. 9
    Mike2 says:

    Rec room/bonus room – gives you some place to put the kids toys during the day and if you need it to it can double as an office/den/guest room when you need to kick the kids out. The best use for a finished basement in most older Seattle houses.

  10. 10

    By wreckingbull @ 10:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 8 – Wheelchair accessibility.

    Seriously? There is apparently a code that the main shut off cannot be over a certain height, but it’s well above where these units are placed. If they were concerned about that you would think they would lower that limit.

    And if that were the concern, you’d think that they would have a ramp from the house to the garage (although I guess that can be added much easier than lowering a panel).

    One realistic concern is that too low you might have an ignition source for gases.

  11. 11

    By David B. @ 9:

    Something else: a kitchen.

    In other words, a house with a real, separate, kitchen (a room with proper walls), not an idiotic “open floor plan” that means cooking smells and kitchen messes are part of your living room.

    What you want is the kitchen off the kitchen I mentioned a few weeks ago. I think the design is more intended for those with servants, but the core cooking area is well closed off from the rest of the house, but there is also a more open area that looks like a traditional kitchen.

  12. 12
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 10 – So people in wheelchairs should not be able to reset a tripped breaker by themselves? I don’t understand your point. The builder is trying to build a home which is accessible to both. Just because a home is not ADA compliant does not mean it can’t have wheelchair friendly features. I lived in a condo once which had 42 inch interior doors. They did not bother me, and I imagine this would be attractive to someone who goes about daily tasks in a wheelchair.

  13. 13

    RE: wreckingbull @ 12 – Although your explanation seems logical, I’m just a bit skeptical for that is the reason for the following reasons:

    1. If it is for wheelchair accessibility, seemingly they would lower the maximum height allowed by the electrical code for the main shutoff breaker, and I’m fairly sure they haven’t changed the code in that manner.

    2. If the electrical code doesn’t mandate the change, I have a bit of a hard time believing contractors would make that change for that reason. It would be about the only change made to houses to make them more wheelchair accessible. (Stated differently, I have a hard time believing that the contractors care.)

    3. I’m not sure that the typical wheelchair user couldn’t reach a more standard height breaker box. Obviously though that would depend on their disability, their size and the height of their wheelchair. For some combinations even the lower panel wouldn’t help.

  14. 14
    whatsmyname says:

    Butler’s Pantry. Also a big fan of kitchen stairs to the maid’s room. It is de riguer that these spaces are finished in noticeably lesser quality than the other household areas.

  15. 15
    David B. says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 11 – No, I just want a traditional single kitchen in a separate room with walls.

  16. 16
    Peter Witting says:

    Sex dungeon.

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