Weekly Open Thread (2014-06-23)

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Here is your open thread for the week of June 23rd, 2014. You may post random links and off-topic discussions here. Also, if you have an idea or a topic you’d like to see covered in an article, please make it known.

Note: The comment limit in open threads is 25 comments per person.

Be sure to also check out the forums, and get your word in the user-driven discussions there!

NOTICE: If you have comments to make about politics or economics that do not somehow directly relate to Seattle-area real estate, they may be posted in the current Politics & Economics Open Thread.  If you post such comments here, they will be moved there.

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About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market. Tim also hosts the weekly improv comedy sci-fi podcast Dispatches from the Multiverse.

82 comments:

  1. 1

    By Blurtman @ 48:

    Surreal Mclaughlin Group show today. (More so than usual). The pundits are no longer disguising the reason for meddling in Iraq – we need the freaking oil. Increasing gas prices will blunt the recovery.

    That would be a really good argument if dictators and terrorists didn’t sell oil. And if Afghanistan had oil.

    As it is, it’s just an anti-war argument that doesn’t hold water. Somewhat surprising that they feel the need to make up additional reasons why war is not a good thing.

  2. 2
    Blurtman says:

    If they sell oil and if it is not off line. Google the oil market’s reaction in 2002 when Saddam took production off line as a means to demand better treatment of the Palestinians. Would ISIS do something similar? And would there be an attempt to embargo their oil?

  3. 3
    Blake says:

    CNFAI’s Personal Consumption and Housing Index measure came < 0 again… that's 89 consecutive months below 0… "Whose recovery anyways?"
    http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/CANDH

  4. 4

    Its All Good for Seattle Real Estate?

    We’ve heard how good it was when supply was down causing prices to go up; now its real estate is doing better with more supply listings….

    LOL, our MSM is more entertaining than Daffy Duck cartoons…

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/u-housing-regaining-footing-supply-145352230.html

  5. 5
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 1 – Sure, assuming the oil is on the market. But history has shown that when a significant supplier of oil takes it off line, prices go up.

    Iraq halts oil shipments
    Oil spikes as Iraqi exports halted to protest West’s support for Israel.

    http://money.cnn.com/2002/04/08/news/international/iraq/

    And so the pundits were fretting about what a spike in oil prices would mean to the tepid recovery, And also thereby justifying intervention by the USA in Iraq, yet again.

    Oink! Oink! That Tahoe burns a lot of gas, dammit, how dare those ingrates attempt to interfere with driving the gas guzzler to soccer matches!

    And where is that Saddam fellow now? Oh the rape rooms, or was it bayonetted babies wrested from incubators? Oink! Oink!

  6. 6

    RE: Blurtman @ 4

    Is Iraq Just a Lame Excuse to Gouge Us for Gasoline in the Summer Months?

    Maybe its all orchestrated ahead of time….LOL…

  7. 7

    RE: Blurtman @ 4 – I agree there can be short term hits. Longer term there can be inefficiencies caused by ineptitude in pumping and transporting the oil. But it’s not all that significant in the scheme of things.

    But why use a Tahoe as an example? Why not go with a Hummer? Remember how many of those there used to be? I wonder where they all went? I did see one the other day–apparently his Spinnerz (sp?) broke, but he was still using the wheels designed for them. Brought back memories of two stupid fads.

  8. 8
    Blake says:

    I’ve long suspected that major oil producers would have an interest in keeping oil off the market to drive up prices – – via war etc. There’s just too much money at stake and if the price goes up $10/brrl it means billions in pure profits (above and beyond all fixed cost expenses). So watching Iraq, Iran, and Libya get pounded with war, sanctions and chaos the last few years I know that Putin, the Saudis and many Texan billionaires are quite pleased. Then I saw this report from Stratfor this past week that mentioned a meeting June 3rd in Sochi with Putin, Saudi Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov…
    http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/intrigue-lying-behind-iraqs-jihadist-uprising#ixzz350jTEH66
    -snip- Our attempt to obtain information about the gathering from Russian and Saudi contacts resulted in scripted and strangely identical responses that claimed that Saudi Arabia and Russia were discussing a power-sharing resolution for Syria. The state-owned Saudi Press Agency then reported June 10 that Lavrov and al-Faisal had a follow-up phone conversation to discuss a Syrian settlement. Syria may well have been on the agenda, and Russia has an interest in protecting its influence in Damascus through a deal that keeps Syrian President Bashar al Assad in power, but we suspect there was more to these engagements.

    Both Saudi Arabia and Russia share two key interests: undermining the U.S.-Iranian negotiating track and ensuring oil prices remain at a comfortable level, i.e., above $100 a barrel. There is little either can do to keep Iran and the United States from negotiating a settlement. In fact, the jihadist threat in Iraq creates another layer of cooperation between Iran and the United States. That said, Washington is now facing another major Middle Eastern maelstrom at the same time it has been anxiously trying to prove to itself and everyone else that the United States has bigger issues to deal with in other parts of the world, namely, in Russia’s backyard. Moreover, the United States and Turkey are not of one mind on how to manage Iraq at a time when Washington needs Ankara’s cooperation against Russia. If an Iraq-sized distraction buys Moscow time to manage its own periphery with limited U.S. interference, all the better for Putin. Meanwhile, if Saudi Arabia can weaken Iran and test U.S.-Iranian cooperation, it might well be worth the risk for Riyadh to try — at least for the time being.
    (end quote)

    Also: A lot of the “new” oil and gas being exploited (fracking etc) is very costly to produce and only profitable at $90/brrl or more… so at $120/brrl the profits triple vs. only $100/brrl. Just sayin’…

  9. 9

    By Blake @ 7:

    I’ve long suspected that major oil producers would have an interest in keeping oil off the market to drive up prices – – via war etc. There’s just too much money at stake and if the price goes up $10/brrl it means billions in pure profits (above and beyond all fixed cost expenses).

    That’s actually another counter-argument to the war for oil argument. Probably big oil was making more money off of the conditions in pre-2002 Iraq than what they were ever likely to make getting into Iraq.

  10. 10

    Anyone else appreciate the irony of the Obama administration sending Kerry to Iraq to tell al Maliki to be more inclusive and receptive to his political opposition? He’s right, but it really is a pot meet kettle situation.

    On the bright side, this probably means that Obama won’t order airstrikes in the US until the political climate improves. ;-)

  11. 11
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 6 – Sure, and why can’t I get a Humvee with a 50 caliber machine gun option in the states?

    There is actively taking oil off line (see Saddam), there is the perceived threat of oil going off line, and then there is an attempted oil embargo for a regime who the USA would rather not see the oil revenue going to, like, perhaps ISIL. It would be interesting to see the USA attempt an oil embargo today (e.g., China, Roosia).

    My only point was the extremely cavalier attitude that the pundits were describing the right of the USA to intervene in Iraq, so as not to derail the fragile recovery. It isn’t even being debated anymore, apparently. Oink.

  12. 12
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 9:

    Anyone else appreciate the irony of the Obama administration sending Kerry to Iraq to tell al Maliki to be more inclusive and receptive to his political opposition?

    Obama has bent over backwards to appease Republicans so much that at times it’s gotten Democrats mad. Republicans just don’t like Obama and will oppose him on anything- even the release of a POW! the Democrats are the same as always while the Republican party is the most radical it’s been in decades.

  13. 13
    Blake says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 9:

    Anyone else appreciate the irony of the Obama administration sending Kerry to Iraq to tell al Maliki to be more inclusive and receptive to his political opposition? He’s right, but it really is a pot meet kettle situation.

    On the bright side, this probably means that Obama won’t order airstrikes in the US until the political climate improves. ;-)

    Like Cabot-Lodge meeting with Diem in Vietnam in ’63… followed by a few select phrases and wink-wink towards the Generals and Diem has a bullet in the head and Vietnam is on the path to peace! (…or permanent war – whatever!)

    We may see prime Minister Chalabi by the end of the year! (Yes… THAT Chalabi!)

    This is a great piece by a long time MidEast expert on the US’s “ready, shoot, aim” military blunderbuss strategy that has worked so well for the Middle East for the last 50 years!
    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/06/william-r-polk-on-grand-strategy-iraq-and-syria/373221/

    btw: For Americans 23 years old or younger, the US has been bombing Iraq their whole lives!

  14. 14
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Blake @ 12 – Now Chalabi is our kind of guy! A psychopathic liar who thinks nothing of advancing his career and personal wealth upon the blown apart corpses of Iraqi women and children (100,000 during the invasion alone, according to epidemiologists at Johns Hopkins). I think we can work with him.

  15. 15

    By pfft @ 11:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 9:

    Anyone else appreciate the irony of the Obama administration sending Kerry to Iraq to tell al Maliki to be more inclusive and receptive to his political opposition?

    Obama has bent over backwards to appease Republicans so much that at times it’s gotten Democrats mad.

    Yes, we know you are an Obamabot. No need to prove it.

    Although you are right about one thing. Obama is such a bad negotiator that he did completely cave a few times, and that did make some Democrats mad. But that’s what happens when you start the negotiations with a position that you know is completely unacceptable to the opposition.

  16. 16

    RE: Blake @ 12 – Iran is probably the best example of failed government policy.

  17. 17
    Blake says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 15:

    RE: Blake @ 12 – Iran is probably the best example of failed government policy.

    ??? Iran? why? …no war? Looks like the sanctions took hold an the Iranian people voted for a moderate who has reached out to the west and they have been converting their uranium to metal plates that can never be used for weapons.
    Ohhh… you mean all the scary propaganda!!!
    http://harpers.org/blog/2014/05/manufactured-crisis-the-untold-story-of-the-iran-nuclear-scare/

    btw: The last of Syria’s chemicals weapons were shipped out of the country this week!!! If we had bombed and invaded last summer the central government might have collapsed and those weapons could be in the hands of ISIS by now! As much as I despise Obama, he deserves a TON of credit for not attacking Syria last August… That was bullshit.

  18. 18

    RE: Blake @ 16 – I was referring to supporting the Shah of Iran. And there was a war, between Iran and Iraq, where we supported both sides so that they would kill as many of each other as possible, without either side actually winning.

  19. 19
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 15:

    By pfft @ 11:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 9:

    Anyone else appreciate the irony of the Obama administration sending Kerry to Iraq to tell al Maliki to be more inclusive and receptive to his political opposition?

    Obama has bent over backwards to appease Republicans so much that at times it’s gotten Democrats mad.

    Yes, we know you are an Obamabot. No need to prove it.

    Although you are right about one thing. Obama is such a bad negotiator that he did completely cave a few times, and that did make some Democrats mad. But that’s what happens when you start the negotiations with a position that you know is completely unacceptable to the opposition.

    “Yes, we know you are an Obamabot.”

    no in the slightest. you’re projecting kary. I’ve voiced plenty of criticism of Obama. I have better criticisms of him than the stuff you make up like the Las Vegas thing and the healthcare hyperinflation scenario you concocted.

    “But that’s what happens when you start the negotiations with a position that you know is completely unacceptable to the opposition.”

    and the reason it’s unacceptable is because Obama embraced it. in almost every major bill obama has added “sweeteners.”

    did you forget kary that republicans met the first not of Obama’s presidency and vowed to block everything he did. remember how their goal was to make an obama a one-term president? not the economy or jobs.

  20. 20

    By pfft @ 19:

    did you forget kary that republicans met the first not of Obama’s presidency and vowed to block everything he did. remember how their goal was to make an obama a one-term president? not the economy or jobs.

    Did you forget that Obama and Pelosi basically said they could do whatever they wanted because they won the election? They completely shut the Republicans out of the process from day one.

    But before you keep saying that you’ve been critical of Obama, give an example! And quit using the Vegas example which even Obama would agree with me on since he apologized (or did your forget that in less than a week?) And quit using the hyperinflation example since Obamacare has only been fully implemented (subject to non-statutory exemptions by our new Emperor) for less than 6 months. You know damn well I wasn’t saying it would be instantaneous.

  21. 21
    Blurtman says:

    Kary,

    I’d put the below on the Healthcare thread, but I don’t think anyone goes there anymore. The comments in the link below are also interesting.

    “Who Will Have Health Insurance in the Future? An Updated Projection

    The passage of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) in the United States put the issues of health care reform and health care costs back in the national spotlight. DeVoe and colleagues previously estimated that the cost of a family health insurance premium would equal the median household income by the year 2025. A slowdown in health care spending tied to the recent economic downturn and the passage of the PPACA occurred after this model was published. In this updated model, we estimate that this threshold will be crossed in 2033, and under favorable assumptions the PPACA may extend this date only to 2037. Continuing to make incremental changes in US health policy will likely not bend the cost curve, which has eluded policy makers for the past 50 years. Private health insurance will become increasingly unaffordable to low-to-middle–income Americans unless major changes are made in the US health care system.”

    http://www.annfammed.org/content/10/2/156.abstract?ijkey=865a05195ab9b98312a35f8dbd5d4380849010e6&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

  22. 22

    RE: Blurtman @ 21 – Not a problem. They can just increase the minimum wage to $50. /sarc

    I don’t really think much of long term price predictions, but since the Affordable Care Act did nothing to control costs, that wouldn’t be surprising.

    But I wonder whether there study gets to median income equaling the cost of insurance by having the cost of insurance rise or the median income collapse? It could be either (or both).

  23. 23
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 22 – At a cost of more than $300,000 a year, the new cystic fibrosis drug, ivacaftor (Kalydeco), is one of the most expensive pills in American medicine.

    This week three doctors who treat cystic fibrosis patients said that kind of extremely high pricing for new drugs that treat rare conditions threatens the U.S. health care system and can’t be sustained.

    http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pulmonology/CysticFibrosis/42018

  24. 24
    Blurtman says:

    Insurers Worry That $84,000 Hepatitis C Drug Sovaldi Could Break the Bank
    By Reuters

    NEW YORK/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Shocked by the rapid adoption of a new $84,000 hepatitis C treatment, U.S. health insurers are trying to make sure they aren’t blindsided by other drugs being developed and are looking for ways to limit their use from the day they are launched.

    Manufacturer Gilead Sciences Inc says 30,000 people have received hepatitis drug Sovaldi so far, and that sales hit a record-breaking $2.3 billion within a few months. The treatment, typically 84 pills taken over 12 weeks, completely cures the disease in more than 90 percent of patients.

    As many as 3.2 million Americans are infected by hepatitis C, and the cost of giving most of them Sovaldi would surpass $200 billion. Some insurers have already put conditions on who can get the drug, and states including California and Texas have slowed or put treatment on hold while they study what to do.

    http://www.newsweek.com/insurers-worry-84000-hepatitis-c-drug-sovaldi-could-break-bank-252539

  25. 25
    ChrisM says:

    RE: pfft @ 19 – “I’ve voiced plenty of criticism of Obama.”

    Link please.

  26. 26
    ChrisM says:

    RE: Blurtman @ 24 – One wonders what that drug costs in Canada and Mexico. One then wonders why Americans cannot purchase medicine from our dear NAFTA partners.

  27. 27

    RE: Blake @ 8
    The Down-side to High Oil Prices

    Stock dividends can shoot up through the roof like oil profits, but there is a limit to what the American consumer can buy. Oil prices reached $4/gal during last year’s spring bounce too, then quickly plummetted to the lower $3/gal….when we stopped buying higher levels of gas and food. We ran out of money.

    That’s the one equation the brainless overpopulation pundits forget, when you sour wages with too many job seekers and wages/hours/benefits plummet [they have]….who’s gonna buy the gas and food? The Tooth Fairy?

  28. 28

    RE: Blurtman @ 23 – I think I brought that up several months ago, linking a Technology Review article. The only reason they can charge those sums for drugs is insurance, and Obamacare’s no lifetime limits makes it even more possible for them to charge those sums. Obamacare is the most poorly thought out piece of legislation in history.

    For every one insured with a condition that needs this drug an insurance company needs 1,000 healthy clients who pay $300 a month and don’t have any claims.

  29. 29

    By ChrisM @ 26:

    RE: Blurtman @ 24 – One wonders what that drug costs in Canada and Mexico. One then wonders why Americans cannot purchase medicine from our dear NAFTA partners.

    Those other countries probably don’t want us to be able to buy drugs there. That would cause their prices to rise. If that occurred, then both legal and illegal US drug policies would be ruining Mexico.

  30. 30

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 29
    Protectionism is World Business as Usual

    Unless it occurs in America, then we hear lame Statue of Liberty comparisons from our past history with no relationship to today’s scarce/overpopulated job market and open border pundit Dem/Reps suddenly holding hands singing “Kumbihah” over an unrelated to our economy’s fix Civil Rights Bill passed 70 years ago….we’ve simply lost our backbone, focus and brains to be a great country again. Japan and Europe protectionists are laughing at us too, as they restrict immigration to zero and steal all our automotive engineering and Boeing commercial jet part production jobs too.

  31. 31

    The first quarter GNP figures were reduced downward. The first quarter under Obamacare was a growth rate of a negative 2.9%. But hey, it was only the weather. /sarc

  32. 32

    RE: Blurtman @ 24

    Irrespective, It Sounds Far Cheaper Than a Liver Transplant

  33. 33
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 31

    You may be skeptical about how much weather contributed, but today’s downward revision to Q1 GDP was largely due to reduced health care spending wasn’t it? One quarter’s data is pretty irrelevant IMO but if you want to draw conclusions based upon one quarters data, maybe the ACA really is decreasing the percentage of GDP that America spends on health care. Aren’t increasing health care costs the biggest issue for government spending and the national debt, and a huge issue if we want to compete in the global market place? I dislike the Affordable Care Act (and just about any synthetic or artificial market solution, like carbon credits, because IMO markets aren’t that easily predictable and newly created artificial markets likely have unforeseen consequences) but if you want to draw conclusions about the AFA based upon Q1 GDP, the AFA is arguably helping to fix the biggest piece of the health care crisis and the federal deficit. Either that or it was too cold and snowy back east to go to the doctor.

  34. 34
    Blurtman says:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 32 – Sovaldi is a very effective drug with less side effects than many alternatives. And is is a more convenient oral medication. But I doubt very much there is data showing that it prevents liver transplant. Let’s hope it does. Keep in mind that “cure” does not at all mean permanent disease eradication. It may mean disease eradication observed during a defined time period, like 24 weeks, for example.

  35. 35
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Blurtman @ 24

    So you’re in the bio-tech business aren’t you Blurt? Are you saying Gilead is still a good buy? Merck’s drug is still a long way from approval isn’t it? What’s it cost to treat a Hep C patient over their life expectancy vs the 82K cost for a course of Gilead’s drug. My guess is that 82K is the present value winner unless Merck or someone else has a comparable product that’s significantly less expensive with a high probability of approval and coming to market in the next few years.

  36. 36
    Blake says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 18:

    RE: Blake @ 16 – I was referring to supporting the Shah of Iran. And there was a war, between Iran and Iraq, where we supported both sides so that they would kill as many of each other as possible, without either side actually winning.

    OK… sorry!

  37. 37

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 33 – I’ve said I’m being slightly factious pointing to the first quarter as a sign of what Obamacare is doing. I agree one quarter doesn’t mean much, but that’s a huge drop.

    And you’re right a drop in health care spending contributed to some of that (and much of the latest revision). I haven’t read much of what that’s about. Maybe the high Obamacare deductibles are keeping people away from the doctor. ;-)

  38. 38
    Blake says:

    This is from CAARE run by my old friend (and business partner) Doug Miller in Minnesota:
    http://www.inman.com/2014/06/24/consumer-advocacy-group-weighs-in-against-zillows-coming-soon-feature/
    CAARE: Sellers should pay no more than 1 percent if an offer is generated during prelisting period

    … what say you?

  39. 39
    pfft says:

    By ChrisM @ 25:

    RE: pfft @ 19 – “I’ve voiced plenty of criticism of Obama.”

    Link please.

    Syria and not prosecuting wall street for starters.

  40. 40
    pfft says:

    By ChrisM @ 26:

    RE: Blurtman @ 24 – One wonders what that drug costs in Canada and Mexico. One then wonders why Americans cannot purchase medicine from our dear NAFTA partners.

    that actually is Obama’s fault! no really. obamacare didn’t allow the importation of drugs because he needed(or thought he needed) the support of the pharma industry

  41. 41

    RE: Blake @ 37 – Zillow’s “Coming Soon” violates NWMLS rules against pocket listings, so it’s unlikely it will be an issue here.

  42. 42
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 28:

    RE: Blurtman @ 23 – I think I brought that up several months ago, linking a Technology Review article. The only reason they can charge those sums for drugs is insurance, and Obamacare’s no lifetime limits makes it even more possible for them to charge those sums. Obamacare is the most poorly thought out piece of legislation in history.

    For every one insured with a condition that needs this drug an insurance company needs 1,000 healthy clients who pay $300 a month and don’t have any claims.

    links please.

    “Obamacare is the most poorly thought out piece of legislation in history.”

    it’s more than 20 years old. LOL

    you are a blame obamabot!

  43. 43
    pfft says:

    Boehner Announces Lawsuit Against Obama ‘In The Coming Weeks’
    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/boehner-will-sue-obama

    LOL.

  44. 44
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 31:

    The first quarter GNP figures were reduced downward. The first quarter under Obamacare was a growth rate of a negative 2.9%. But hey, it was only the weather. /sarc

    it’s not obamacare. obamacare did little to detract from GDP. GDP is expected to rebound in the 2nd quarter. it was mostly due to weather.

  45. 45

    By pfft @ 42:

    Boehner Announces Lawsuit Against Obama ‘In The Coming Weeks’
    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/boehner-will-sue-obama

    LOL.

    Not sure why you think that’s funny. Pretty clearly Obama has been abusing power. You should know that just from what he’s done on Obamacare. But then there’s that pesky little issue of killing Americans. Really Boehner should be opening impeachment proceedings, but he might be waiting on that until after the elections.

    I do though have my doubts the courts will want to get involved in a fight between two other branches of government. They will do whatever they can to wiggle out of that, and there is good authority for that.

  46. 46
    Blurtman says:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 32 – Sure, let’s hope it does replace a liver transplant, whose total costs are north of $500,000. But I would be surprised if there was data to demonstrate that. Keep in mind that “cure” does not mean disease free forever. It could mean disease free for a defined period of time only, like perhaps 12 or 24 weeks. A drug can be described as a cure for cancer, for example, even if the cancer recurs after time.

  47. 47
    Blurtman says:

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 34 – Well, Sovaldi is quite effective, is taken orally (big plus), and has fewer side effects than conventional therapeutics. Patients like it, docs, like it, Blurt says “Buy! Buy! Buy!”* Idelalisib‎ going to be a massive blockbuster for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. Even bigger than the ground shaking and game changing ibrutinib. GILD seems to be doing it right, and have been for a while. A leader in small molecule drugs.

    Agree about Merck, Abbvie and others. Sovaldi is the new gold standard. Lots of saber rattling from payers, maybe some thoughts about aligning with an emerging alternative when on the market, but lots of unknowns yet.

    Remember, trade with your head, and not over it. And may all of your buys be good buys!

    * Blurtman is not an investment advisor. Caveat emptor. Always void where prohibited.

  48. 48
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Blurtman @ 46

    Thanks Blurt.

  49. 49

    Any interest in this local appraisal fraud/identity theft story:

    http://mynorthwest.com/980/2547673/Eastside-couple-arrested-in-massive-home-appraisal-fraud

    The lead investigator was a guest speaker in my class today.

    King County Superior Court
    State of WA
    v.
    Douglas Ross White
    Diana Joline Merritt

  50. 50

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 48 – I’m going to take the Mack McCoy approach on that one, and suggest that to the extent these are appraisals for sales, and not refinances, that it’s probably much to do about nothing. At least from a property value or loan risk perspective–there are seemingly clear identity theft and licensing violations.

    But I don’t think anywhere near even 10% of transactions get blown out of the water on appraisals, and so if you let 400 transactions pass without a proper appraisal that means only less than 40 would be suspect. The idea that this would impact entire neighborhoods is ludicrous.

    I also have to laugh a bit about the article and questioning the motivation. $400 is a lot of money to some people, where for others it’s their hourly rate. The motivation is clear–to “earn” a living.

  51. 51

    I thought CNBC was in Obama’s camp. Have they abandoned him too?

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101791342#. (Obamacare Will Suck The Life Out of the Economy).

    Oh, and this starts out addressing the moronic position that “the weather” caused the decline in GNP.

  52. 52

    RE: Blurtman @ 45

    Have You Noticed a Cycle With the Pharma Industry?

    1. They devlop the new wonderful drug and advertise it on media.
    2. We buy it up like hotcakes.
    3. Then it gets linked with disease, illness and death of the patient.
    4. Then its a class action lawsuit suing the Pharma Companies on the media.

    I wouldn’t touch new prescription drugs until years later, if they get generic competition for lower prices and a track record of not killing us off. Same with riding in a plastic composition 787 LOL.

  53. 53

    The Emperor gets his wrist slapped by the US Supreme Court:

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2014/06/26/supreme-court-obama-senate-appointments/8528059/

    (Illegal recess appointments invalidated.) Hey, I thought Obama never exceeds his power? Didn’t pfft tell us that?

  54. 54

    RE: pfft @ 39

    Obama’s Fault

    I especially agreed with Obama on his disagreement with the Supreme Court 5-4 ruling allowing foreign/corporate lobbyists’ bribes of our elections [they even voted for unlimited anarchist lobbyist money recently too now] and picking out our candidate choices too [I’d add, then later blaming the voters for what they didn’t want]. This single HORRIFYING issue is destroying America today in my book. I also agreed with Obama trying to get real Bachelors of Science teachers [paid more of course] in our public highschools to really teach math and science again.

    Obama’s done a lot of HORRIFYING Bush type mistakes on the economy though, which places a doubt in my mind on the good things he’s said and done, is it all hype to get our votes then be an evil lobbyist puppet anyway?

  55. 55

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 48

    Earth Shatterring Jillayne

    My step mother was an appraiser and she saw my Bellevue home before I gutted the whole house and re-did it myself [with skilled sub-contractors under me] in 1994 for about $26K then….she told me my two months labor netted me $40K, or $16K profit.

    This shyster is going to jail and imagine how much that one criminal impacted Seattle Real Estate Prices? It answers many questions on why reduced listing supplies would ever raise prices from those bad investers that bought in this negative scenarionand paid too much anyway. He sold his snake oil all over the Seattle area, none of us were immune evidently….

  56. 56

    RE: softwarengineer @ 53 – Not sure why you hate the First Amendment, but the Citizen’s United case has not had any impact on any elections. Any claim otherwise is just total nonsense. Or did I somehow forget the Republican landslide in 2012?

    Politicians want to control spending on elections to help incumbents get re-elected. They have a huge advantage as an incumbent and preventing entities like the NRA from advertising against them helps them even further.

  57. 57
  58. 58
    Blake says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 50:

    I thought CNBC was in Obama’s camp. Have they abandoned him too?

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101791342#. (Obamacare Will Suck The Life Out of the Economy).

    Oh, and this starts out addressing the moronic position that “the weather” caused the decline in GNP.

    Kary, I think you mean MSNBC – who have tried to become a sort of liberal version of Fox. CNBC is the business network… and they are failing:
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-06-24/cnbc-viewership-drops-lowest-1997-cramer-has-worst-month-ever

  59. 59

    RE comment #49 Kary, the lead investigator said the appraisals noted in the public records document and in the MyNorthwest.com story were a drop in the bucket compared to all the other appraisals that they did not name in the indictment. They include refinances, purchases, reverse mortgages. I’ll be keeping an eye on this one. Not all the loans are performing.

    He was working as a real estate agent/ appraiser up until his arrest a few weeks ago.

  60. 60
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 58 – This fellow has a fine career awaiting him at Moody’s and S&P.

  61. 61
    DrRick says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 44

    My personal opinion (YMMV) is that Pres. Obama is portrayed as a populist, who actually is a business as usual Wall St/Chicago functionary. He started with some idealism, got into Chicago politics, was placed on the fast track to national office, and has less influence or control than he ever imagined a President would have. His brand worked for awhile but is now dated and needs updating.

    I’m unclear from the article what the essential legal points of Boehner’s suit will be, but it probably will not be based on Executive Order abuse. Our Dear Leader ranks on the low end, modernly speaking.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_order

    I think the lawsuit is a play for media coverage by an increasingly irrelevant Boehner, in an attempt to shift the imminent 2016 election.

    In terms of Seattle Real Estate (Tim, are you reading?), Not much should change. The Fed wants to preserve as low rates as possible, and is dealing with mixed information as to which direction the economy is going, The Democrat faction of the One Party want stability, and the Republican faction of the One Party want to introduce uncertainty.

    I think the market will be sideways to down, based on uncertainty factors.

    Fel Temp Reparatio

  62. 62
    DrRick says:

    By Blurtman @ 45:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 32 – Sure, let’s hope it does replace a liver transplant, whose total costs are north of $500,000. But I would be surprised if there was data to demonstrate that. Keep in mind that “cure” does not mean disease free forever. It could mean disease free for a defined period of time only, like perhaps 12 or 24 weeks. A drug can be described as a cure for cancer, for example, even if the cancer recurs after time.

    I hear what you are saying, Blurtie. But the specialists in the field use the “cure” word. Your post points towards unanticipated costs being an issue, if I read it right.

    Right now, fatty liver disease progressing to cirrhosis, is the new #1 driver of liver transplant.

    Fel Temp Baby, living the dream.

  63. 63
    DrRick says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 55:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 53 – Not sure why you hate the First Amendment, but the Citizen’s United case has not had any impact on any elections. Any claim otherwise is just total nonsense. Or did I somehow forget the Republican landslide in 2012?

    Politicians want to control spending on elections to help incumbents get re-elected. They have a huge advantage as an incumbent and preventing entities like the NRA from advertising against them helps them even further.

    I can’t argue on your points, I have no decent research to present, so my comments are on an opinion basis. The problem I have with the Citizens’ United decision is that it puts large moneyed interests in a position with more rights than an actual real person citizen. Corporations composed of non people have more legal rights that real people. This edge cuts both ways wrt advocacy groups whether it’s the NRA or Koch Bros, Inc. I think this process is inherently pernicious and corrosive to any version of a Democratic Republic.

    Fel Temp Reparatio

  64. 64
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Jillayne Schlicke @ 58

    Jillayne, did the investigator point to any evidence saying that the values in the appraisals appeared to be distorted, either due to incompetence or fraud?

    I think a big part of Kary’s point was whether the guy was doing competent appraisals without a license (which probably wouldn’t affect pricing) or was doing incompetent appraisals (or selling incorrect appraisals) that had market prices out of wack. By way of analogy, I don’t want to hire an unlicensed contractor, but if they pull the permits and competently build a structure, the lack of a license doesn’t make the building structurally unsound.

    Some of the comments in the article (perhaps by Chris Spence who as an attorney perhaps representing interested parties may have an ulterior motive) imply that this guy was mainly looking for work and his only fraud was using an old employer’s license but that he wasn’t selling excessively valued appraisals. Despite the lack of a license, those comments imply that the appraised values may well have been the same as would have been obtained from a licensed appraiser and that the fraud didn’t involve distortion of real estate market pricing.

  65. 65

    By DrRick @ 60:

    I’m unclear from the article what the essential legal points of Boehner’s suit will be, but it probably will not be based on Executive Order abuse. Our Dear Leader ranks on the low end, modernly speaking.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_order

    The number of executive orders is just a nonsense argument raised by partisan Democrats (not you). For one thing, most EOs tend to be issued when a president leaves office–at least if the new president will be from another party. It’s sort of a parting FU, like when the Clinton people removed all the W’s from the computer keyboards.

    But it’s not the number, it’s what they do! Obama has used his powers to order the killing of American citizens. That’s worth at least 1,000,000 other executive orders, IMHO, if you just want to count executive orders. But beyond that, he extends deadlines in legislation, such as Obamacare. While the executive does have some powers when it comes to enforcement (e.g. not enforcing Marijuana laws), the executive does not have the power to amend statutes, or to issue orders which conflict with statutes.

  66. 66

    By DrRick @ 62:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 55:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 53 – Not sure why you hate the First Amendment, but the Citizen’s United case has not had any impact on any elections. Any claim otherwise is just total nonsense. Or did I somehow forget the Republican landslide in 2012?

    Politicians want to control spending on elections to help incumbents get re-elected. They have a huge advantage as an incumbent and preventing entities like the NRA from advertising against them helps them even further.

    I can’t argue on your points, I have no decent research to present, so my comments are on an opinion basis. The problem I have with the Citizens’ United decision is that it puts large moneyed interests in a position with more rights than an actual real person citizen. Corporations composed of non people have more legal rights that real people. This edge cuts both ways wrt advocacy groups whether it’s the NRA or Koch Bros, Inc. I think this process is inherently pernicious and corrosive to any version of a Democratic Republic.

    Fel Temp Reparatio

    Rich people live in better houses and have younger better looking spouses (or mistresses). Life is not fair. But in the case of the NRA, a lot, if not most of its money comes from individuals, $35 at a pop. Unions $20 a month in dues. In the case of Koch Bros, Inc. (assuming their is such an entity), it is seemingly controlled by two brothers. Why should they somehow be restricted in what they do to get their message out?

    As to pfft’s Krugman piece, I don’t want to waste a post on that, but it’s total BS. Just because Krugman says something doesn’t mean it’s true. Just about every self insured person in Washington state had their insurance cancelled. The number of new insured did not exceed that. And rates did skyrocket. That’s been well covered by the press.

  67. 67
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 64

    Now now, are they reeeealy citizens, or do they forfeit that status when they become enemy combatants in the Psycho-Babble Films production “WAR ON TERRORRRRRRR!”

    Executive Producer, Dick Cheney. Line Producer, who’s ever in the white house now.

  68. 68
    Blurtman says:

    {\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1252
    {\fonttbl\f0\fnil\fcharset0 ArialMT;}
    {\colortbl;\red255\green255\blue255;\red0\green0\blue0;\red255\green255\blue255;}
    \deftab720
    \pard\pardeftab720\sl400\partightenfactor0

    \f0\fs28 \cf2 \cb3 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
    \outl0\strokewidth0 \strokec2 RE: DrRick @ 61 – I hope I am open minded on Sovaldi. I am merely stating a belief that GILD has no data to back up a claim that the drug is a less costly alternative to a liver transplant. Hope it does keep folks from needing one, just don’t believe they have the data to show it.\

    GILD went for the gold, and broke an unwritten covenant in that they charged a relatively high price for a large market indication. It used to be OK to do that for orphan drugs, but now pharma is subdividing everything into an orphan disease, in true opportunistic Wall Street fashion, so that may also need to be addressed. Physicians do not believe this is sustainable. ASCO is already sounding the alarm.

    Will the industry self-police? Does a CEO’s bonus poop in the woods?

  69. 69
    Blurtman says:

    {\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1252
    {\fonttbl\f0\fnil\fcharset0 ArialMT;}
    {\colortbl;\red255\green255\blue255;\red0\green0\blue0;\red255\green255\blue255;}
    \deftab720
    \pard\pardeftab720\sl400\partightenfactor0

    \f0\fs28 \cf2 \cb3 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
    \outl0\strokewidth0 \strokec2 RE: DrRick @ 61 – I hope I am open minded on Sovaldi. I am merely stating a belief that GILD has no data to back up a claim that the drug is a less costly alternative to a liver transplant. Hope it does keep folks from needing one, just don’t believe they have the data to show it.

    GILD went for the gold, and broke an unwritten covenant in that they charged a relatively high price for a large market indication. It used to be OK to do that for orphan drugs, but now pharma is subdividing everything into an orphan disease, in true opportunistic Wall Street fashion, so that may also need to be addressed. Physicians do not believe this is sustainable. ASCO is already sounding the alarm.

    Will the industry self-police? Does a CEO’s bonus poop in the woods?

  70. 70
    Blake says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 65
    Just pause for a second and take a look at what American elections have become… THEY are spending more money than ever (by far… $10 billion for the 2012 campaign!) and does anyone think that WE are getting good information…? … better information to help us decide who to vote for? Seriously… American democracy is joke! LEAST democratic system in the western world and getting worse… (And how pitiful is it that we try to spread our corporatocracy to other countries! FREEDOM!)
    http://www.townhallseattle.org/robert-mcchesney-john-nicholsdollarocracy/
    http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-how-dollarocracy-is-destroying-america/

    We have leaglized corruption… that is it.
    And I love talking with tea partiers or conservatives like Kary…. I find common ground with them talking about how corrupt Congress is (“yup yup… just terrible”) then I ask, “so who do you think is corrupting Congress?” Blank stares then “unions” (!!)… “special interests” (I think they mean monorities and women’s groups?) When I say Finance Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE), NRA, military industrial, I$rael lobby I get more blank stares…
    Idiotic… they love complaining about the government and how corrupt it is, but if you discuss the details there is no there there… hello?? They don’t want a representative democracy… they just want to complain…
    The system is broken and getting worse.

  71. 71

    RE: Blake @ 69 – Do you think the quality of our politicians has somehow gone downhill because of the spending by third party groups? That was the topic of Citizen’s United (assuming you consider a documentary producer to be a third party group).

    I agree our representation is bad, but that’s more due to the political parties (Democrats and Republicans) and the power of incumbency than it is due to third party groups that the political parties try to control via legislation they call “campaign spending reform.” Or again, did I somehow miss the massive change in election results in 2012 after Citizen’s United?

    But if you think there is a solution, what is it that doesn’t involve gutting the First Amendment? And BTW, I consider myself more an independent or a libertarian. If I were a conservative there would probably be a politician I liked somewhere in the country. I did want Romney to win, but that was because Obama had already been proven a failure and I didn’t like the character assassination that was being done on him by political hacks like pfft. (And he was more acceptable than most the other Republican candidates.)

  72. 72
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 65:

    By DrRick @ 62:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 55:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 53 – Not sure why you hate the First Amendment, but the Citizen’s United case has not had any impact on any elections. Any claim otherwise is just total nonsense. Or did I somehow forget the Republican landslide in 2012?

    Politicians want to control spending on elections to help incumbents get re-elected. They have a huge advantage as an incumbent and preventing entities like the NRA from advertising against them helps them even further.

    I can’t argue on your points, I have no decent research to present, so my comments are on an opinion basis. The problem I have with the Citizens’ United decision is that it puts large moneyed interests in a position with more rights than an actual real person citizen. Corporations composed of non people have more legal rights that real people. This edge cuts both ways wrt advocacy groups whether it’s the NRA or Koch Bros, Inc. I think this process is inherently pernicious and corrosive to any version of a Democratic Republic.

    Fel Temp Reparatio

    Rich people live in better houses and have younger better looking spouses (or mistresses). Life is not fair. But in the case of the NRA, a lot, if not most of its money comes from individuals, $35 at a pop. Unions $20 a month in dues. In the case of Koch Bros, Inc. (assuming their is such an entity), it is seemingly controlled by two brothers. Why should they somehow be restricted in what they do to get their message out?

    As to pfft’s Krugman piece, I don’t want to waste a post on that, but it’s total BS. Just because Krugman says something doesn’t mean it’s true. Just about every self insured person in Washington state had their insurance cancelled. The number of new insured did not exceed that. And rates did skyrocket. That’s been well covered by the press.

    links for all claims please. I shouldn’t have to ask.

  73. 73
    pfft says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 64:

    By DrRick @ 60:

    I’m unclear from the article what the essential legal points of Boehner’s suit will be, but it probably will not be based on Executive Order abuse. Our Dear Leader ranks on the low end, modernly speaking.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_order

    The number of executive orders is just a nonsense argument raised by partisan Democrats (not you). For one thing, most EOs tend to be issued when a president leaves office–at least if the new president will be from another party. It’s sort of a parting FU, like when the Clinton people removed all the W’s from the computer keyboards.

    But it’s not the number, it’s what they do! Obama has used his powers to order the killing of American citizens. That’s worth at least 1,000,000 other executive orders, IMHO, if you just want to count executive orders. But beyond that, he extends deadlines in legislation, such as Obamacare. While the executive does have some powers when it comes to enforcement (e.g. not enforcing Marijuana laws), the executive does not have the power to amend statutes, or to issue orders which conflict with statutes.

    links please.

    “But beyond that, he extends deadlines in legislation, such as Obamacare.”

    you think that Obamacare will destroy the american health system AND at the same time mad he is delaying parts of the law? The delays are most likely legal. Bush’s medicare part D had delays but a big deal wasn’t made about that…

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/gop-medicare-part-d-obamacare

    Boehner Will Sue Obama For Stuff He Thought Was Totally Fine Under George W. Bush
    http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/06/25/3453244/boehner-executive-order-suit/

  74. 74
    Blake says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 70
    Citizen’s United just continued a longer trend that started in 1976 with Buckley v. Valeo. Latest rulings just reinforce the trend…

    The big money doesn’t just mean the Republicans get extra… The Damn Dems become more n more beholden to big money… no candidates can run without big $. It’s too expensive.

    Obama and the Dems are a disaster, but teh Repugs cannot capitalize because they have too many kooks who liek to talk about rape and such… and then the Kochs and Adelson are so extreme they cannot have the sense to finance reasonable people.

  75. 75
    Blake says:

    btw: This ponzi scheme is gonna bust real soon… it’s like 2007 or 2008 all over again…
    http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/13509/

  76. 76

    RE: Blurtman @ 59
    Perhaps he can work on his resume while awaiting trial.

  77. 77

    RE: One Eyed Man @ 63
    OEM-
    Lead investigator indicates that more will become public record (regarding the quality of the appraisals) during the trial.

  78. 78
    One Eyed Man says:

    RE: Blake @ 72

    Sorry for the long rant Blake, but I’d prefer to hear a few more proposed solutions than the pundits seem willing to set forth.

    With all due respect to Stockman, his article seems to sensationalize the current economic situation for effect while failing to propose any better solutions to our continuing problems. Do you really see the economy in 2014 as even remotely similar to 2007? Sure, real estate and securities markets might be modestly overvalued at this point (based upon “fundementals”), but IMO the economic environment isn’t all that similar to 2007.

    In 2008, a Republican president nearly had to nationalize the entire US financial sector to avoid financial collapse and a freeze up of the entire US economy. They avoided that potential humiliation to the right wing market capitalists by passing TARP to stop the quickly approaching bank runs and instituting ZIRP and QE (and perhaps issuing get out of jail free card to the financial sector corner office occupants) to allow the crony capitalist bankers (like there’s ever been any other kind) to work their way out of the red (no pun intended).

    Sure, the S&P could back up 10% easily, but that happens every couple of years, unlike the collapse of 2008 which historically happens about once in a lifetime. I seriously doubt that the S&P will retrace to the low of 666 or whatever the bottom was. And sure the CSI could drop 5% this winter or perhaps even 10%, but probably not the much higher percentage we’d need to see in order to return to the CSI lows either Nationally or in Seattle.

    I could probably list a dozen material statistical differences between 2007 and 2014 ranging from better capitalized banks to housing being a much smaller part of the economy, that point to a limited correction rather than a 2008 type deflation fueled liquidation sale of the American asset pool. And I will probably always see deflation as a far more dangerous threat to the economy than any probable level of inflation that QE might cause.

    So what’s the point of people like Stockman bitching about current Fed policy given the circumstances. Does he have some better way to move forward? Would he prefer that the FED put 3 Trillion in Treasuries on the market next month and push the Fed Funds rate to its historic norm at the next Fed meeting? I don’t think so. He’s pissing on everybody’s feet but he doesn’t have anything significantly different or better to propose than a moderate tapering of QE followed by a very slow move out of ZIRP and a very slow liquidation of the Fed balance sheet. Any dramatic move would risk potentially violent sentiment swings and increase the level of uncertainty perhaps to intolerable levels.

    Just about everybody would like to see some sort of tax reform that puts US companies on an equal footing with other countries but no one seem to have a fix that’s tax revenue neutral and economic class neutral. And everybody would like to see the US financial deficit disappear although I’ve never heard a middle class senior citizen tea party member say “I want you to cut my social security and Medicare coverage so we can balance the budget.”

    No matter what we do, the entrance of several billion people from emerging markets into the labor pool with which we compete will hold down US employment and GDP for the rest of my life, maybe longer. We had 4% economic growth during some years in the Reagan era because of the voodoo tax policy and the bubble of the S&L scandal. Reagan and Bush also pumped the economy by doubling (or was it tripling?) the national debt with tax cuts and military spending.

    We had 4% economic growth during some years of the Clinton era but probably in large part because of the building of the tech bubble. I don’t think we ever had 4% annual GDP during the W era and probably averaged about 2.0% economic growth during his term. And it would have been significantly less but for the building of the financial and housing bubbles, not to mention the pumping of the economy by increasing national debt thru tax cuts and increased military spending.

    The average GDP growth since 1948 has been 3.2%. But I don’t see a current or future global economic environment for the US to compete in during the next 10 years that will easily allow for that average rate. Even after QE and ZIRP end, 2% to 2.5% GDP growth and 5% to 6% U-3 are probably about all your going to get out of an economy that has to compete with the non-living wage rates of emerging markets while hopefully decreasing some of our current federal deficit.

    Many if not most of the working people of the 3rd world can’t afford to buy the products they produce so they won’t be buying all the TV’s they build. They’re destined for our retail consumption. Each dollar spent on imports detracts from US GDP. The American work force can only afford imported goods as long as price is held down by low foreign wages, fracking brings on US energy independence and decreased US manufacturing costs, and we continue to produce intellectual property that provides a productivity advantage that the emerging markets don’t have the skills to immediately duplicate.

    Neither Stockman, nor any other pundit or political party has a proposal to fix the cost of labor competition from emerging markets. But emerging market competition even coupled with a federal deficit equal to 100% of GDP and major entitlement liability issues probably doesn’t take the S&P to 666 either. At least not in the short term.

    I yearn to hear potential solutions as opposed to complaints about the incompetence of past decision makers. Unfortunately, I think the best solution from the stand point of global competition is to replace the corporate tax with a form of regressive sales tax, designed and applied so that all goods and services, both foreign and domestic are equally affected. I despise regressive tax systems, but I don’t know of a more effective solution.

    I’m not a gambling man, but I do believe in probability analysis and am not opposed to wagering a lunch or just bragging rights against any proposition I believe to be improbable, like say the S&P finishing the year end below 1850, or CSI falling more than 5% in the next 12 months. I’d even wager we’re not currently in recession and that Q2 GDP will be above 1% on initial and final print.

    Feel free to educate me if you believe I’m wrong. At the price of a lunch and my potential humiliation the lesson is still a bargain compared to college tuition and probably better spent.

  79. 79

    Redfin needs to explain how labeling certain listings as “Hot Buys” will help anyone not miss out on their dream home. Will being labeled a “Hot Home” make intelligent buyers stay away from that home?

    I don’t see how this would be any more accurate than Zillow, because valuation relative to list price is a big part of how quickly a listing sells. Not to mention I doubt they have a way to automate reviewing the pictures to get any idea at all what the house looks like inside. Would they do that manually?????

    http://realtormag.realtor.org/daily-news/2014/06/27/sparking-buyer-urgency-redfin-debuts-hot-home-tool#sf3469722

  80. 80
  81. 81

    RE: Blurtman @ 80

    Tomorrow is Ira’s birthday. :)

  82. 82
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Ardell DellaLoggia @ 81 – Happy Birthday, Ira!

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