Poll: Ideally, what season of the year would you prefer to buy a home?

Ideally, what season of the year would you prefer to buy a home?

  • spring (23%, 11 Votes)
  • summer (15%, 7 Votes)
  • fall (4%, 2 Votes)
  • winter (23%, 11 Votes)
  • Time of year doesn't matter to me when buying. (35%, 17 Votes)

Total Voters: 48

This poll was active 08.31.2014 through 09.06.2014

0.00 avg. rating (0% score) - 0 votes

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market.

15 comments:

  1. 1

    Summer Works Well With Kids in School

    But is not the best price time to buy.

  2. 2
    ongsomwang says:

    Somewhat on, or off topic, but would any of you recommend selling your home through redfin vs. one of the more traditional means? Lots of traditional agents I have spoken too have given me negative reviews regarding it.

    I really need to sell my home this spring!! I would love to get some thoughts.

    Thanks.

  3. 3
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: ongsomwang @ 2 – Did you catch the series on alternate brokers on this blog?

    https://seattlebubble.com/blog/2014/04/28/alternative-brokerages-flourishing-around-seattle/

    You might find some insight there, although you will need to wade through the usual shite in the comments.

  4. 4

    RE: ongsomwang @ 2 – It really depends on the individual agent no matter what company you go through. I’ve seen some good Redfin agents and some bad ones. I could say the same thing about just about every other major company.

    The one issue I would raise is I don’t know whether Redfin does open houses yet. For some areas that can be very beneficial.

  5. 5
    The Tim says:

    By ongsomwang @ 2:

    Would any of you recommend selling your home through redfin vs. one of the more traditional means? Lots of traditional agents I have spoken too have given me negative reviews regarding it.

    Well I mean what do you expect the competition to say? “Yeah, Redfin is great! You get a full service agent, professional listing photos, sweet online seller tools, and an immersive 3D walkthrough of your home integrated on Redfin, all for half of the three percent that I’m charging!”

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 4 – Yes, Redfin does open houses if the seller wants it. Although, I would argue that in the Seattle market, open houses don’t help sell your home.

  6. 6
    Oahu Realty says:

    Back on topic, I would try and submit a contract in November or December as those seem to be the slowest months here on Oahu. It might not make a huge difference but I believe a buyer might get a better deal during those months.

  7. 7
    ongsomwang says:

    By The Tim @ 5:

    By ongsomwang @ 2:

    Would any of you recommend selling your home through redfin vs. one of the more traditional means? Lots of traditional agents I have spoken too have given me negative reviews regarding it.

    Well I mean what do you expect the competition to say? “Yeah, Redfin is great! You get a full service agent, professional listing photos, sweet online seller tools, and an immersive 3D walkthrough of your home integrated on Redfin, all for half of the three percent that I’m charging!”

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 4 – Yes, Redfin does open houses if the seller wants it. Although, I would argue that in the Seattle market, open houses don’t help sell your home.

    Tim (or anyone else) what is your take on SE King County? (specifically Auburn, and Covington area). I would imagine that areas away from the core of Seattle would probably benefit from an open house more.

    I have noticed the value of my home down there has not been rising as steadily as Seattle. Ever since late August zillow has shown my home to be dropping again (argh). Anyone who owns property along the I-90 corridor is lucky.

    Thanks everyone.

  8. 8

    RE: <a href='#comment-244586' –

    Yes, Redfin does open houses if the seller wants it. Although, I would argue that in the Seattle market, open houses don’t help sell your home.

    Well you’d be wrong. An individual seller doesn’t give a squat about stats of open houses selling. They only care about whether a buyer shows up at their open house and makes a decent offer. Open houses mean more people seeing the house, and that is good for sellers.

    Also, for an occupied house, vacating once at a time planned in advance is much better than vacating ten times.

  9. 9
    wreckingbull says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 8:

    RE: <a href='#comment-244586' –

    Yes, Redfin does open houses if the seller wants it. Although, I would argue that in the Seattle market, open houses don’t help sell your home.

    Open houses mean more people seeing the house, and that is good for sellers.

    .

    Qualified people looking to buy a home similar to the listing, or just people?

  10. 10

    RE: ongsomwang @ 7

    You have a significant amount of competition from new construction there, and it is hard to beat brand new. I pulled the data on Spring sales this year in Auburn and Covington on a combined basis March 15 through June 30, and of the 143 homes sold between $300,000 and $450,000 a full half of them were built in or after 2011 and most of those brand new.

    Who your agent is, what company they are with and whether or not you have an open house is fairly insignificant. Showing condition and online presentation as to fabulous photos is what is going to sell the home, along with appropriate pricing. Very little room for messy, smelly conditions or poor photos when your competition is new or relatively new homes.

    Too much new construction in an area also impedes appreciation in the older/resale homes, as the resale homes have to undercut the new construction competition as to price, in most cases.

    In the areas I work (not that far South) I can still list a house with “will look at offers on” and get offers by Monday. I don’t do an Open House during that time as I find with low inventory a lot of people show up who are not even in that price range, just because there are no houses to see. If they are going to buy in a higher price range they have a lot of negative things to say in front of people who are making offers…not good. I wouldn’t think about Open Houses until after the home is on market with no offers for at least a week to ten days for that reason.

    Required Disclosure: Stats in this post are not compiled, verified or published by The Northwest Multiple Listing Service

  11. 11
    ChrisM says:

    Isn’t this a dupe poll?

    https://seattlebubble.com/blog/2010/12/12/poll-when-is-the-best-season-to-buy-a-home-weather-wise/

    Seems like the obvious answer is winter, to see what the flooding issues are.

  12. 12
    Blurtman says:

    RE: Ardell DellaLoggia @ 10 – In an environment of rising home prices, doesn’t one obtain less when buying new? At least where I live, it seems that the economics result in less value for the buyer, and possibly more for the developer. Just look at the tiny lot sizes of the newer homes, resulting higher density, and less privacy, possibly a reflection of the rising cost of land?

  13. 13

    By wreckingbull @ 9:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 8:

    RE: <a href='#comment-244586' –

    Yes, Redfin does open houses if the seller wants it. Although, I would argue that in the Seattle market, open houses don’t help sell your home.

    Open houses mean more people seeing the house, and that is good for sellers.

    .

    Qualified people looking to buy a home similar to the listing, or just people?

    It doesn’t matter as long as it’s both. I’ve had more than one open house generate multiple offers. Once two of the buyers came back a second time during the open house at the same time. That house was listed previously and didn’t sell. Was that open house a waste of time to hold the open house?

    BTW, any statistics you see on open houses are likely BS.

  14. 14

    RE: Blurtman @ 12 – RE: Ardell DellaLoggia @ 10 – In an environment of rising home prices, doesn’t one obtain less when buying new? At least where I live, it seems that the economics result in less value for the buyer, and possibly more for the developer. Just look at the tiny lot sizes of the newer homes, resulting higher density, and less privacy, possibly a reflection of the rising cost of land?

    Using data vs opinion the data says a full half of the people buying homes in ongsomwang’s stated area are buying new homes. Whether or not they should be doing that doesn’t change his reality. This is more true of further out vs close in neighborhoods, as often the primary reason people will go further out is to get new. The same person who will buy a new house there may instead opt for closer in if the choice becomes older house with more land.

    One of the oddities of the areas where I work, which I think are closer to where you live, is that the majority of people who are “from” here agree with you…but they do not form the majority of people who are actually buying homes vs merely having an opinion as to what others “should” buy. The people buying homes are the new breed who do not want too much quiet nor do they want to spend their reduced “free time” maintaining a large lot or spend too much of their disposable income on major improvements to old houses.

    Now that there are fewer new houses to buy closer in, as opposed to 2004 to 2008, you see the older homes appreciating a lot more than they did in the bubble when new homes were more readily available. This is very true of Kirkland, Bellevue, Redmond. But in areas where there is still a lot of available land like Auburn and Covington where the questioner lives, used home has to cost less than new. Half of the buyer pool is otherwise occupied over at the New Construction Model home and it is difficult to sway them or expect them to pay the same or more for used vs new.

    PLUS new construction is more amenable to a contingent offer for the move up buyer. Timing closings is not easy. Selling before buying is easier said than done for a family with children and pets. Buying new is often the “right” decision because the builder will take a contingent offer more often than a resale seller. This because the builder has 20 more to sell after tying up one in a contingency. The resale seller with only one to sell, can’t afford to lose that time on market waiting to see if the buyer of their home is pricing their home to sell accurately for a quick sale and being realistic as to other efforts needed to sell their home quickly.

    For some odd reason it has always been true that the contingent buyer is also and often the least realistic about pricing their home for a quick sale and less able to keep it in the condition it needs to be in to sell. Too much risk for a seller who has only one to sell vs a full inventory of homes to sell. Builders with little available product will act the same way and be more amenable to a contingency on a future lot than a fully completed spec house, unless he has more than three fully completed spec houses.

    More specific to your question…they usually get more house and less land. A house that needs less money in repairs over the first 10 years…and less land. Less land is the trend. Numero Uno preference is a new home that backs to a greenbelt. Privacy…but not increased maintenance. Enough land for a swing set, but not a football field.

  15. 15
    redmondjp says:

    By ChrisM @ 11:

    Isn’t this a dupe poll?

    https://seattlebubble.com/blog/2010/12/12/poll-when-is-the-best-season-to-buy-a-home-weather-wise/

    Seems like the obvious answer is winter, to see what the flooding issues are.

    From personal experience with my own home and those owned by several friends, there is great wisdom in this statement.

    Amongst my home-owning friends I’m known as “the pump guy.” I go the extra mile in my installs, using cast-iron pumps sitting on rubber isolation blocks so there is no noise or vibration transmitted into the house (first done for a friend with the pump right underneath their bedroom). I also installed a red high-level alarm light in another friend’s garage, so they know when the water level in their outdoor sump goes too high (their crawlspace will flood if the pump isn’t functioning).

    Got water?

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