Poll: How do you commute to work?

How do you commute to work?

  • walk (10%, 22 Votes)
  • bicycle (14%, 31 Votes)
  • motorcycle (1%, 3 Votes)
  • carpool (6%, 13 Votes)
  • bus / train (29%, 62 Votes)
  • drive solo (32%, 69 Votes)
  • I'm unemployed, you insensitive clod. (7%, 15 Votes)

Total Voters: 215

This poll was active 10.07.2012 through 10.13.2012

0.00 avg. rating (0% score) - 0 votes

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market. Tim also hosts the weekly improv comedy sci-fi podcast Dispatches from the Multiverse.

39 comments:

  1. 1
    Vicki says:

    Not actually unemployed – but that seemed the closest to “I don’t.” How about a work from home option?

  2. 2
    Greg says:

    I telecommute. I guess I walk to work…

  3. 3

    RE: Vicki @ 1 – Maybe that would be walk, as in “I walk from the bedroom across the hall to my office.”

  4. 4
    Fulano says:

    Bus and train should be separate.

  5. 5
    Pegasus says:

    If your nanny drives you to work, what category would that fall under?

  6. 6
    HappyRenter says:

    By Pegasus @ 4:

    If your nanny drives you to work, what category would that fall under?

    Carpooling ;)

  7. 7
    Scotsman says:

    Work from home?

  8. 8
    Howard says:

    I am surprised by the number of mass transit users… I have just completed my first month of bus commuting from Redmond to downtown Seattle. Overall it has been a good experience, great money saver (7$ tolls, $5-6 in gas + wear/tear x 20 days = $250+, employer pays for pass)

    I can be at work as early as 430 am using the bus and leave Seattle as late as midnight.

    It has reshaped our house search. I have been looking for walking distance to a good bus route now.

  9. 9
    ChrisM says:

    As mentioned by others, telecommute. Interesting that you wouldn’t consider telecommute as an option. Can one extrapolate from that fact?

  10. 10

    RE: Howard @ 8 – I’m always surprised the bus isn’t more popular. It won’t work for you if you sometimes need your car in the middle of the day (e.g. sales person or attorney), but for many it’s a great option. With tablets and e-books you’d think it would become even more popular.

  11. 11

    By ChrisM @ 9:

    As mentioned by others, telecommute. Interesting that you wouldn’t consider telecommute as an option. Can one extrapolate from that fact?

    Redfin is not a high-tech company. ;-)

  12. 12
    Peter Witting says:

    My commute is 50 miles each way. I had a wonderful carpool arrangement going, until my buddy got laid off. Efforts to find a replacement resulted in one complete psycho and another raging alcoholic. I abandoned the carpooling idea and now I drive alone with my thoughts.

  13. 13
    apartment boy says:

    I think a more interesting question for the folks who work from home: at what time do you transition from sleepwear to actual clothing?

  14. 14
    The Tim says:

    RE: ChrisM @ 9 – Walking across the house is still walking. Why does “telecommute” need its own separate option?

  15. 15
    Blurtman says:

    RE: The Tim @ 14 – Cause you can do it in your PJ’s, or even commando.

  16. 16
    Howard says:

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 10:

    RE: Howard @ 8 – I’m always surprised the bus isn’t more popular. It won’t work for you if you sometimes need your car in the middle of the day (e.g. sales person or attorney), but for many it’s a great option. With tablets and e-books you’d think it would become even more popular.

    Additionally, my employer will pay for your Zipcar membership…. I would need to pick up the hourly rental/gas, but another option for those who only need an occasional car.

    It would certainly be easier to get in the car and rive, the actual cash outlay saved is decent, but the reduction of wear/tear on the car is the biggest benefit to me. It will double the life of the car (hopefully)

  17. 17
    kfhoz says:

    RE: The Tim @ 14
    Walking and Telecommuting may be the same in terms of road-use impact, they are quite different in other things might imply from them.

    Walking to work is pretty difficult to arrange. I know because I got an apartment near enough to my work to do that occasionally for a few years. Then I changed jobs, did not want to move, so had to drive. I have a friend who actually bought his house close to his work to walk. Then he got let go in a downswing. His next job was about an hour commute away, longer by bus which he usually took.

    Telecommuting is quite a different thing to set up.

    I telecommute about twice per month. I could do more, but I get so much out of going to the office and interacting with my co-workers. Also, I do not have great home office space and my office at work is very nice, with a full wall of south facing windows that are gently shaded by deciduous trees.

  18. 18
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: The Tim @ 14 – Tim, the main reason it is interesting in the context of this blog is that it allows you to live very far from the office, and thus drastically changes the type of real estate you can buy.

  19. 19
    jeanette says:

    bicycle + ride the ferry. maybe “boat” should be an option…?

  20. 20

    I had a job when I was in high school where I regularly hitchhiked to work. In the small town I lived in, it was considered a normal thing to do. Would that fall under carpool?

  21. 21
    The Tim says:

    RE: jeanette @ 19 – Doh. Ferry totally should have been an option. I recently had a coworker who ferried to downtown Seattle from Bremerton. Oh well.

  22. 22
    Steve says:

    How about “combination”? I drive and/or bike to the nearest park and ride, then take the bus. Based on the number of cars, the former seems like a pretty popular option.

  23. 23

    By wreckingbull @ 18:

    RE: The Tim @ 14 – Tim, the main reason it is interesting in the context of this blog is that it allows you to live very far from the office, and thus drastically changes the type of real estate you can buy.

    Yes, it would make living in Medina and working in Seattle a realistic option! ;-)

  24. 24

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 20:

    I had a job when I was in high school where I regularly hitchhiked to work. In the small town I lived in, it was considered a normal thing to do. Would that fall under carpool?

    If no one picks you up it would be the same as walking.

  25. 25

    By Kary L. Krismer @ 24:

    By Ira Sacharoff @ 20:

    I had a job when I was in high school where I regularly hitchhiked to work. In the small town I lived in, it was considered a normal thing to do. Would that fall under carpool?

    If no one picks you up it would be the same as walking.

    I never had to walk. Work was about six miles away. I always got picked up. Surprising, since I looked even more like a terrorist than I do today.

  26. 26

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 25

    Surprising, since I looked even more like a terrorist than I do today.

    When I was 15 I walked about 10 miles to a party because no one would pick me up. Surprising since back then I looked like Jesus!

    (Side note: When I got there the party was already over because someone started a fight with a broken beer bottle. Not getting there earlier was good. And fortunately I knew someone there with a car so I didn’t have to walk back.)

  27. 27
    David S says:

    So how does everyone pick up or drop off their children with any of the above options other than drive solo? You all taking your kids on the bus? Putting them in a child bike seat? Walking them to school and then continuing your walk to work? Put them on the back of a motorcycle this winter? Convince your carpool it’ll be really quick to drop them off or pick them up?

    Never mind, Seattle’s mostly child-less.

  28. 28
    Howard says:

    By David S @ 27:

    So how does everyone pick up or drop off their children with any of the above options other than drive solo? You all taking your kids on the bus? Putting them in a child bike seat? Walking them to school and then continuing your walk to work? Put them on the back of a motorcycle this winter? Convince your carpool it’ll be really quick to drop them off or pick them up?

    Never mind, Seattle’s mostly child-less.

    Easy… I leave the kids at home with the nanny and the car. By me taking the bus, she has a car to take them to parks, beach, etc. Having a live in nanny has been much less expensive and I feel better for the kids.

    If I didn’t take the bus, I would probably have to buy another car or put the kids in daycare. I have two more years of needing childcare.

  29. 29
    JB says:

    If we consider how much time we spend on the computer or in the car, it is almost obligatory for us to walk or cycle. Whoever becomes lazy and starts using his car for everything soon becomes addicted to it. It is necessary to remember walking is the most native movement. I personally love to go hiking on the weekends, especially to the BC´s hiking trails I have the luck that I live at walking distance from my work. I really don´t get how people survive travelling long distances to work. My uncle, for example, had to wake up at 4 a.m. just to be able to arrive at 7 a.m. to his work.

  30. 30
    Matt the Engineer says:

    My answer: Yes.

    I drive, drop my wife off at work, kid off at school, then walk 2 miles to work.

    Or I bike, drop my son off at school, then bike to work.

    Or I take the bus to my son’s school, then take the bus to work.

    Or I drive, drop my wife off at work, kid off at school, then ride the bus to work.

    Or, on sunny weekends when I have to go into the office, I ride a scooter.

    Or, if I’m in a real hurry or need the car, I drop my wife off at work, son at school, and drive alone to work.

    One time, during the snopocylipse, I snowshoed to work (ok, down QA hill).

    (what, no ferry option?)

  31. 31
    David B. says:

    All I have to say is the those who answer polls here sure seem to be not as into driving alone to work as the average commuter:

    Mode shares other than driving alone:
    http://daily.sightline.org/2010/10/07/how-your-city-gets-to-work/

    Driving alone:
    http://daily.sightline.org/2010/10/04/who-are-the-northwests-commute-leaders/

    Myself, I live close to work and bicycle there (or, if the weather or my health is crappy, take the bus). I’m hoping to eventually switch to telecommuting pretty much full time, at which point (and only at that point) I will seriously consider moving out of the big city.

    A long, long time ago when I was a kid we once got trapped in the afternoon rush hour returning from a weekday family visit to Chicago. I was shocked when my parents said that this sort of traffic happened daily, and most of the people on the road drove in it twice a day. I couldn’t fathom doing so on a daily basis, and promised myself then and there I would make every effort to avoid that fate.

  32. 32
    Doug says:

    I live 14 miles away on the 405 corridor, and drive alone.

    I used to bus, but I was constantly getting sick from the press of people. Last year, the buses started to fill up to the point that there wasn’t any room on some of them, and the average wait at the bus stop was 40 minutes or so.

    So I switched to carpooling. But then I got a promotion at work, and I no longer can commit to a regular work day. I’m often working 9+ hour days. So now I drive alone.

    My commute to and from work, about 14 miles as I said, can often take 70 minutes. It’s terrible. The only thing I resent about my company is that theire HQ is in Bellevue, and they don’t pay nearly enough to live in Bellevue, Kirkland, or Redmond.

  33. 33
    Howard says:

    By Doug @ 32:

    I live 14 miles away on the 405 corridor, and drive alone.

    I used to bus, but I was constantly getting sick from the press of people. Last year, the buses started to fill up to the point that there wasn’t any room on some of them, and the average wait at the bus stop was 40 minutes or so.

    So I switched to carpooling. But then I got a promotion at work, and I no longer can commit to a regular work day. I’m often working 9+ hour days. So now I drive alone.

    My commute to and from work, about 14 miles as I said, can often take 70 minutes. It’s terrible. The only thing I resent about my company is that theire HQ is in Bellevue, and they don’t pay nearly enough to live in Bellevue, Kirkland, or Redmond.

    I wish the State would release traffic count numbers from the 520 bridge. In the two months I have been commuting to Seattle from Redmond it seems like a ghost town (leave Redmond at 630 am and leave Seattle at 430pm)

    I have left Seattle at 405pm and walked in my door in Redmond at 430pm (driving)

  34. 34
    wreckingbull says:

    RE: Doug @ 32 – This happened to me when I started taking Metro in the 90’s. I was sick on and off for two years. Then, not unlike Peter Parker, I gained super powers. Perhaps you could have called me Immunoman. I went over a decade without ever getting sick once, even though I was surrounded by people hacking and sneezing all day long on the bus and in the office. It was quite remarkable.

    Now that I have been telecommuting for five years, I am probably a wussy again, although I may never know, as I really don’t get exposed to sick people that often.

  35. 35
    Blurtman says:

    RE: wreckingbull @ 34 – Well said. There is an emerging body of evidence that describes one possible cause of autoimmune disease being a too aseptic environment. As the thinking goes, your T cells require stimulation, and if not from an exogenous challenge, such as day to day microbes, than yourself. So, put your kids out in the yard, and instruct them to eat dirt.

  36. 36

    RE: Blurtman @ 35 – There was a news story on the NBC evening news last night about how using too much anti-bacterial product isn’t a good thing. One theory is it leads to more allergic conditions in children.

  37. 37

    My dog drank out of the Duwamish and lived til 17.

  38. 38
    Hugh Dominic says:

    I took the bus until RapidRide launched with a massive blast of suck. Now I drive.

  39. 39
    David B. says:

    RE: Kary L. Krismer @ 36 – My guess is that overusing antibacterials is also doing an excellent job of breeding super-bacteria that can resist such chemicals, much like antibiotic overuse in humans and particularly in farm animals has done.

Leave a Reply

Use your email address to sign up with Gravatar for a custom avatar.
Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Please read the rules before posting a comment.