Top 10 Most-Viewed Posts of 2011

Next up in the “Top 10 of 2011” series: the most-viewed individual posts. Note of course that this only counts how many times people clicked through to each post’s individual link, excluding all the views they may have received on the front page.

  1. 2,851 pageviews, 02/14: New York Times: Seattle Sellers Simply Surrendering
  2. 3,255 pageviews, 03/23: REO Buyers: Beware of Multiple Offer Sudden Death
  3. 3,390 pageviews, 05/31: Case-Shiller: Seattle Gets a Teeny Tiny Spring Bounce
  4. 3,676 pageviews, 04/29: Claim: Seattle Real Estate Market Suddenly Heating Up
  5. 3,683 pageviews, 03/22: How Are High Condo HOA Fees Justified?
  6. 3,736 pageviews, 03/16: Are Seattle-Area Rents Poised to Shoot Up Again?
  7. 3,859 pageviews, 12/21: Real Actual Listing Photos: BEHOLD THE HYPERCLOUDS
  8. 4,924 pageviews, 03/29: Case-Shiller: Seattle Home Prices Nearly 30% Off Peak
  9. 5,366 pageviews, 05/27: Guess What
  10. 5,763 pageviews, 08/28: The Return of the Pink Pony!

No doubt we have the Bronies to thank for #1.

Not represented in this list is 2011’s far and away most popular content, the video I shot of a Real Actual Home Improvement. My video made the rounds across a bunch of sites (Reddit, Gawker, White Trash Repairs, Sports Illustrated, and a bunch more), racking up over a million views between YouTube & Break.com.* Whoa.

*[Some jerk ripped my video off YouTube, uploaded it to Break.com, & took credit for it as their own. Thankfully the Break.com staff were friendly and responsive, and promptly transferred it to an account I created.]

0.00 avg. rating (0% score) - 0 votes

About The Tim

Tim Ellis is the founder of Seattle Bubble. His background in engineering and computer / internet technology, a fondness of data-based analysis of problems, and an addiction to spreadsheets all influence his perspective on the Seattle-area real estate market. Tim also hosts the weekly improv comedy sci-fi podcast Dispatches from the Multiverse.

20 comments:

  1. 1

    The Price Destroying Bull in the Pink Pony China Cabinet

    For 2011, was in general, IMO, the demise of the upper income tax credit welfare to buy a house and the subsequent demise of QE2 instruments…..we’re broke, no more welfare handouts to America’s top 10% household incomes buying Seattle homes. The stock market was probably negative for 2011 as a result of no more QE2s and the home prices keep spiraling down in a ball of foreclosed fire like a crashing airplane….

  2. 2
    ARDELL says:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 1

    Sometimes I wonder what World you live in. Mine sees the 52 week range of the Dow from 10,404 to it’s current 12,249. How do you see a 2% to 4% drop in home prices as “spiraling down” and an 18% increase in the DOW as “negative”.

    If an 18% gain looks negative to you, you might need some Prozac.

  3. 3
    Brad says:

    the market is not negative and not up 18%!

    “The stock market is set to end a tumultuous year more or less where it started.

    The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 26 points, or 0.2 percent, at 12,262 at noon Friday. The S&P 500 fell 1 point at 1,262. It’s up just 0.3 percent for 2011. The Nasdaq rose 1 point to 2,615.”

    from Seatttle Times 12-30-11
    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2017123210_apuswallstreet.html

  4. 4
    ARDELL says:

    Using the “52 week range” from The Dow site:

    http://www.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=INDEXDJX:DJI

    Clearly not “negative” territory, anyway you slice it.

    Even using pure start to finish, it’s up 6%. So I ask again, why do I often see comments on 1% to 2% or even up to 4% down in Home Prices called “Spiraling DOWN” and yet a 6% increase in the Dow is “negative”???

    Seems like a bias toward seeing everything as worse than it really is to me. Being the opposite of a “Pink Pony” is no better, or worse, than being a “Pink Pony”.

  5. 5
    Lurker says:

    RE: ARDELL @ 4

    52 week range shows the highs and lows of the 52 week year, not where it began and where it ended.

    http://www.investopedia.com/terms/1/52-week-range.asp#axzz1i3Dwby4E

    Dow ended a little up, nasdaq a little down and S&P about the same. General consensus is that it was a nothing year.

    (unless you were gaining/losing some dough in those crazy swings!)

  6. 6
    Pegasus says:

    RE: ARDELL @ 4 – How is your prediction from mid August that local real estate prices would drop 6 to 10 percent in about 4 and 1/2 months working out? Historically that was an extremely large drop predicted. I would call that plunging in real estate pricing since it is rarely seen especially in a decline. The DOW on the other hand has gyrated much more historically and a 6 percent move seems insignificant due to the inherent volatility. It seems you are comparing apples to oranges.

  7. 7
    Cheap South says:

    Oh, those 2011 headlines brought up some memories. You need to play Auld Lang Syne everytime someone opens this story.

  8. 8
    Sweet Pea says:

    By ARDELL @ 4:

    Using the “52 week range” from The Dow site:

    http://www.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=INDEXDJX:DJI

    Clearly not “negative” territory, anyway you slice it.

    Even using pure start to finish, it’s up 6%. So I ask again, why do I often see comments on 1% to 2% or even up to 4% down in Home Prices called “Spiraling DOWN” and yet a 6% increase in the Dow is “negative”???

    Seems like a bias toward seeing everything as worse than it really is to me. Being the opposite of a “Pink Pony” is no better, or worse, than being a “Pink Pony”.

    The movement in the Dow and S&P this year has been based on speculation on the action of governments, not fundamentals of the equities. Down on bad news, up on “good” (kicking the can) news. Investing in the U.S. equities market on the whole this year was gambling and speculation, not a signal for how well the economy is doing. Any use of these figures otherwise is just selection of spin on whatever story one wants to tell.

    The can has been kicked by the U.S. and EU gov’ts. The ECB is lending to banks so banks will buy EU gov’ts debt. Nothing fundamental has been solved. The U.S. budget super committee has failed. The payroll tax cut was extended sufficiently to kick the can, as well. Nothing has been solved.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/marketbeat/2011/12/28/wonk-alert-stocks-closing-the-year-not-so-tightly-correlated/?mod=WSJBlog

  9. 9
    Scotsman says:

    RE: Sweet Pea @ 8

    And there you have it. Nothing has really changed for the positive, and the potential negatives have increased.

    The only truly significant news was the failure of the Super Committee to come up with an agreement on even the smallest of cuts. That speaks volumes, suggesting there won’t be a timely political solution to the crunch that will/must eventually hit. Full speed ahead, over the cliff.

  10. 10

    If You Get Good Ratings on Seattle Bubble

    You’re most likely working for the real estate industry and your blogs won’t be hidden?

  11. 11

    RE: ARDELL @ 2

    Since I Obviously Don’t Work For the Real Estate Industry

    I don’t wear Pink Eye Glasses, I don’t Work in the Real Estate Field Like You.

    The American stocks were down to 1.06% YTD as of November [Dec may eat that up likely] without QE2, hey with gas and food up 30-50% don’t spend the 1% all in one place, especially after you pay your income taxes….I’m so glad my savings account supplements over priced real estate by lowerring interest rates :-)

    And if you find constant degradation in real estate a good time to buy, I’ll stick with my putrid 1% or 0% or -1% stock market, it doesn’t lose me so much equity.

    Now make sure to rate me negative…..BTW, that’s good, it will attract other bloggers to read my blog when its faded out [and they’ll skip over your’s]….LOL

  12. 12
    tomtom says:

    By ARDELL @ 4:

    Using the “52 week range” from The Dow site:

    http://www.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=INDEXDJX:DJI

    Clearly not “negative” territory, anyway you slice it.

    Even using pure start to finish, it’s up 6%. So I ask again, why do I often see comments on 1% to 2% or even up to 4% down in Home Prices called “Spiraling DOWN” and yet a 6% increase in the Dow is “negative”???

    Seems like a bias toward seeing everything as worse than it really is to me. Being the opposite of a “Pink Pony” is no better, or worse, than being a “Pink Pony”.

    The Wilshire 5000 represents the stock market. The Dow is only a small subset.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilshire_5000

    http://www.google.com/finance?q=INDEXNASDAQ:W5000

    For the year the ‘US stock market’ was down 1.38% beginning to end.

  13. 13

    RE: softwarengineer @ 10 – On the bright side, they are no longer as hidden. I could actually read what you wrote.

  14. 14

    By softwarengineer @ 10:

    If You Get Good Ratings on Seattle Bubble

    You’re most likely working for the real estate industry and your blogs won’t be hidden?

    That’s really a ridiculous assertion. Most of the people reading and commenting on Seattle Bubble don’t have a high opinion of people who work in the real estate industry, and for good reason. And look at comments that have been greyed out for too many thumbs down. They include Ardell and Kary. I’m sure I’ll be there before too long, and I’ll put money on Ray being there before too long.
    I’m going to give thumbs down to comments that are insulting or name calling. I’m going to give thumbs up to comments that are funny, thought provoking, or make me laugh, even if I disagree with their viewpoints. I disagree with a lot of people here, but without them this place would be far less interesting.

  15. 15
    Scotsman says:

    RE: Ira Sacharoff @ 14

    Going for a thumbs up here:

    I was in the restaurant yesterday when I suddenly realized I desperately
    needed to pass gas. The music was really, really loud, so I timed my
    gas with the beat of the music.

    After a while I started to feel better. I finished my coffee,
    and noticed that everybody was staring at me….

    Then I remembered that I was listening to my iPod.

  16. 16
    ARDELL says:

    RE: softwarengineer @ 11

    For the Record, I’m not one of those 6 thumbs down. I really don’t understand you. But I admit that might be because I sometimes mix you up with Scotsman. :)

    My clients are largely people who are buying a home to live in, not people expecting their home to outperform a stock market. While the truth of the matter is that someone could have bought a DOW Indexed fund at some point during 2011 and gained 18% as of right now, as I said earlier, that has nothing to do with whether they should have bought that OR a home.

    When people are buying a home, they do not think in terms of whether or not it will or won’t outperform “investing” their money in something else. A real estate blog talking about what’s happening in Japan? Honestly…I really don’t see any of my clients caring about what is happening in Japan.

    But like I said…I really don’t understand you or most anyone who is comparing buying a home for their family to alternative investment vehicles.

    When I invested people’s stock and bond portfolios…I didn’t look at their homes either. Two completely different topics to me.

  17. 17
    ARDELL says:

    RE: Pegasus @ 6

    I don’t disagree with any of that, Pegasus. There were some scary times this summer…and I think there will be some scary times next year due to the Presidential Election. It’s hard to discern if the bad news is real or political at times. I do think it was wise to be overly cautious at that point in time. Not that it is not always wise to be cautious, but sometimes the news is so bad you have to stand outside of the fray for a bit until the dust settles.

    I am still very bearish about buying a home that in the best of circumstances has a limited buyer pool due to location or style. I am also bearish about buying brand new homes, as you need some appreciation to counteract the wear and tear from new to the time you sell, just to keep it even.

    There will clearly be some areas, and some homes in any area, that will see the drop I predicted. It is not a good time to buy for someone who is iffy about buying a home. For those who really want to buy a home, they need to be overly cautious about the where and the what they buy.

    As I said in another thread…we have to move from two camps of “Just Say No” abstinence and “It’s a great time to buy”. That is getting so OLD after 7 years or so. It’s time to get down to brass tacks and have good advice for those who are buying…besides “Just Don’t Do It”.

    Waiting 7 years or forever is really not in most people’s overall plan for their families.

  18. 18
    Dweezil says:

    So the thumbs up/down ratio is making comments hard to read? That is just annoying to have grey text on white background. Lame.
    I still want to read the comments I disagree with, even for pure entertainment.

    Adding significance to the high rated posts are ok though.

  19. 19
    Pegasus says:

    RE: ARDELL @ 17 – Sounds like you are now hedging on your prediction of 6-10 percent down by year end when you say “There will clearly be some areas, and some homes in any area, that will see the drop I predicted.” The key word being “some”. “Some” was not in your prediction back in August. How is your original prediction faring since today is the end of the year?

  20. 20
    Peter witting says:

    Back on topic (it’s like herding cats sometimes)…

    The garage-door electric-wire treasure-hunt will never get old!

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